Chomp (B&N Exclusive Edition)

( 232 )

Overview

Wahoo Cray lives in a zoo. His father is an animal wrangler, so he's grown up with all manner of gators, snakes, parrots, rats, monkeys, snappers, and more in his backyard. The critters he can handle.  His father is the unpredictable one.

When his dad takes a job with a reality TV show called "Expedition Survival!", Wahoo figures he'll have to do a bit of wrangling himself?to keep his dad from killing Derek Badger, the show's boneheaded star, before the shoot is over. But ...

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Chomp

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Overview

Wahoo Cray lives in a zoo. His father is an animal wrangler, so he's grown up with all manner of gators, snakes, parrots, rats, monkeys, snappers, and more in his backyard. The critters he can handle.  His father is the unpredictable one.

When his dad takes a job with a reality TV show called "Expedition Survival!", Wahoo figures he'll have to do a bit of wrangling himself—to keep his dad from killing Derek Badger, the show's boneheaded star, before the shoot is over. But the job keeps getting more complicated. Derek Badger seems to actually believe his PR and insists on using wild animals for his stunts. And Wahoo's acquired a shadow named Tuna—a girl who's sporting a shiner courtesy of her old man and needs a place to hide out.

They've only been on location in the Everglades for a day before Derek gets bitten by a bat and goes missing in a storm. Search parties head out and promptly get lost themselves. And then Tuna's dad shows up with a gun . . .

It's anyone's guess who will actually survive "Expedition Survival". . . .

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  • May11_3/Chomp_Promo_53_NO_URL_h264100_BB_dc3e587cc825059b0f884fc826c4f30f1fde75f6
    May11_3/Chomp_Promo_53_NO_URL_h264100_BB_dc3e587cc825059b0f884fc826c4f30f1fde75f6  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Bestselling author Carl Hiaasen's novelistic take on reality shows displays his talents to create fast-breaking action without sacrificing character portrayals. This Barnes & Noble Exclusive edition includes an author's “interview” with one of the main characters of the book.

Publishers Weekly
Hiaasen extends his brand of Florida eco-adventures with this loopy foray into reality TV. Derek Badger, star of Expedition Survival!, arrives to film an Everglades episode, enlisting the services of animal wrangler Mickey Cray, a sort of Dr. Doolittle who specializes in snakes and keeps a 12-foot-long gator named Alice as a pet. Mickey holds his nose but takes the job, assisted by his son, Wahoo, a goodhearted teenager who’s able to handle his father as well as his father handles pythons. Badger, naturally, is a complete fraud, who choppers off to a hotel each evening while mosquitoes dine on his crew. After filming starts, Badger gets lost in the swamp with only his (dim) wits to help him survive. There are no cute owls or endangered panthers to save—tension derives from wondering whether Badger will get himself killed before Mickey does it for him, and a subplot about Wahoo’s friend Tuna, who’s on the run from her abusive father. Not as tightly constructed as Hoot and tamer than Flush, but still pretty hilarious. Ages 10–up. Agent: Esther Newberg, ICM. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
Starred Review, School Library Journal, March 1, 2012:
“Mystery, action, humor, and exotic animals and settings, all tied together by a writer with an exceptional grasp of language, makes this a sure hit with any mystery-loving readers.”

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2011:
“Hiaasen’s best for a young audience since Newbery Honor Hoot (2002) features a shy, deep-feeling protagonist who’s also a pragmatist and plenty of nature info and age-appropriate cultural commentary…. Humorous adventure tales just don’t get any more wacked…or fun to read than this.”

Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
Shy, sensitive Wahoo Cray (named for the wrestler, not the fish) and his parents live in the Everglades, where his dad is an animal wrangler. His father's recent concussion—a dead iguana fell on his head—has led to the family's being behind on their bills, so his mother accepts a long-term job overseas. Wahoo's father is then approached by the staff of the TV show Expedition Survival to help with the filming of an Everglades-based production; he and Wahoo agree to the job in spite of his continuing vision problems. Much of this "reality" adventure show is staged and it quickly becomes obvious that its star, Derek Badger, is also a phony. Wahoo, his dad, and Wahoo's friend Tuna find themselves deep in the Everglades with a motley cast of characters, fighting for their very survival. Hiaasen's latest eco-thriller is filled with unusual animals and plenty of high jinks, along with his usual message of conservation and protecting natural resources. Jabs are made toward today's rash of reality and vampire shows, in humorous fashion of course. Hiassen also takes on family abuse, but even that is handled with some humor. While there is some pretty obvious stereotyping, overall dialogue rings true. Readers will most likely feel great satisfaction as the bad guys meet their comeuppance by the book's conclusion. Wild animals, wild characters, wild airboats and more abound in this most enjoyable romp, with some nature information and cultural awareness thrown in for good measure. Reviewer: Peg Glisson
Kirkus Reviews
Lots of kids think they live in a zoo; Wahoo Cray actually does. Wahoo's dad, Mickey, was the best wild-animal wrangler in south Florida until an iguana, frozen solid in a flash freeze, fell from a tree and conked him on the head. Now, Mickey has migraines and double vision, and the family's in such dire financial straits that Wahoo's mother has taken a temporary job teaching Mandarin to American businessmen in China. When offered good money for the use of Mickey's tame animals, there's no saying no to the production company of Expedition Survival!, a "reality" show starring Derek Badger (actually a former stepdancer named Lee Bluepenny with a fake Steve Irwin Australian accent). The Crays, however, draw the line at harming any animal; and Derek doesn't think the scenes are "real" enough. The production company hires Mickey and Wahoo as guides on an Everglades location shoot, which is complicated in true Hiaasen fashion by an abused, runaway girl from Wahoo's class, a toothy encounter with a jazzed-out snake, a disastrously unsuccessful live-bat brunch…and a vanishing star. Hiaasen's best for a young audience since Newbery Honor Hoot (2002) features a shy, deep-feeling protagonist who's also a pragmatist and plenty of nature info and age-appropriate cultural commentary. Humorous adventure tales just don't get any more wacked…or fun to read than this. (Fiction. 10-15)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375868429
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/27/2012
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 54,227
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 800L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Carl Hiaasen

CARL HIAASEN has been writing about Florida since his father gave him a typewriter at age six. Then it was hunt-and-peck stories about neighborhood kickball and softball games. Now Hiaasen writes a column for the Miami Herald and is the author of many bestselling novels, including Nature Girl and Star Island.

Hoot, Hiaasen's first novel for young readers, was the recipient of numerous awards, including the prestigious Newbery Honor. And Flush, his second book for kids, spent more than a year on the New York Times bestseller list.

Biography

When one thinks of the classics of pulp fiction, certain things -- gruff, amoral antiheroes, unflinching nihilism, and a certain melodramatic self-seriousness -- inevitably come to mind. However, the novels of Carl Hiaasen completely challenge these pulpy conventions. While the pulp of yesteryear seems forever chiseled in an almost quaint black and white world, Hiaasen's books vibrate with vivid color. They are veritable playgrounds for wild characters that flout clichés: a roadkill-eating ex-governor, a bouncer/assassin who takes care of business with a Weed Wacker, a failed alligator wrestler named Sammy Tigertail. Furthermore, Hiaasen infuses his absurdist stories with a powerful dose of social and political awareness, focusing on his home turf of South Florida with an unflinching keenness.

Hiaasen was born and raised in South Florida. During the 1970s, he got his start as a writer working for Cocoa Today as a public interest columnist. However, it was his gig as an investigative reporter for The Miami Herald that provided him with the fundamentals necessary for a career in fiction. "I'd always wanted to write books ever since I was a kid," Hiaasen told Barnes & Noble.com. "To me, the newspaper business was a way to learn about life and how things worked in the real world and how people spoke. You learn all the skills -- you learn to listen, you learn to take notes -- everything you use later as a novelist was valuable training in the newspaper world. But I always wanted to write novels."

Hiaasen made the transition from journalism to fiction in 1981 with the help of fellow reporter Bill Montalbano. Hiaasen and Montalbano drew upon all they had learned while covering the Miami beat in their debut novel Powder Burn, a sharp thriller about the legendary Miami cocaine trade, which the New York Times declared an "expertly plotted novel." The team followed up their debut with two more collaborative works before Hiaasen ventured out on his own with Tourist Season, an offbeat murder mystery that showcased the author's idiosyncratic sense of humor.

From then on, Hiaasen's sensibility has grown only more comically absurd and more socially pointed, with a particular emphasis on the environmental exploitation of his beloved home state. In addition to his irreverent and howlingly funny thrillers (Double Whammy, Sick Puppy, Nature Girl, etc), he has released collections of his newspaper columns (Kick Ass, Paradise Screwed) and penned children's books (Hoot, Flush). With his unique blend of comedy and righteousness ("I can't be funny without being angry."), the writer continues to view hallowed Florida institutions -- from tourism to real estate development -- with a decidedly jaundiced eye. As Kirkus Reviews has wryly observed, Hiassen depicts "...the Sunshine State as the weirdest place this side of Oz."

Good To Know

Perhaps in keeping with his South Floridian mindset, Hiaasen keeps snakes as housepets. He says on his web site, "They're clean and quiet. You give them rodents and they give you pure, unconditional indifference."

Hiaasen is also a songwriter: He's co-written two songs, "Seminole Bingo" and "Rottweiler Blues", with Warren Zevon for the album Mutineer. In turn, Zevon recorded a song based on the lyrics Hiaasen had written for a dead rock star character in Basket Case.

In Hiaasen's novel Nature Girl, he gets the opportunity to deal with a long-held fantasy. "I'd always fantasized about tracking down one of these telemarketing creeps and turning the tables -- phoning his house every night at dinner, the way they hassle everybody else," he explains on his web site. "In the novel, my heroine takes it a whole step farther. She actually tricks the guy into signing up for a bogus ‘ecotour' in Florida, and then proceeds to teach him some manners. Or tries."

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    1. Hometown:
      Tavernier, Florida
    1. Education:
      Emory University; B.A., University of Florida, 1974

Read an Excerpt

ONE

Mickey Cray had been out of work ever since a dead iguana fell from a palm tree and hit him on the head.

The iguana, which had died during a hard freeze, was stiff as a board and weighed seven and a half pounds. Mickey's son had measured the lifeless lizard on a fishing scale, then packed it on ice with the turtle veggies, in the cooler behind the garage.

This was after the ambulance had hauled Mickey off to the hospital, where the doctors said he had a serious concussion and ordered him to take it easy.

And to everyone's surprise, Mickey did take it easy. That's because the injury left him with double vision and terrible headaches. He lost his appetite and dropped nineteen pounds and lay around on the couch all day, watching nature programs on television.

"I'll never be the same," he told his son.

"Knock it off, Pop," said Wahoo, Mickey's boy.

Mickey had named him after Wahoo McDaniel, a professional wrestler who'd once played linebacker for the Dolphins. Mickey's son often wished he'd been called Mickey Jr. or Joe or even Rupert—anything but Wahoo, which was also a species of saltwater fish.

It was a name that was hard to live up to. People naturally expected somebody called Wahoo to act loud and crazy, but that wasn't Wahoo's style. Apparently nothing could be done about the name until he was all grown up, at which point he intended to go to the Cutler Ridge courthouse and tell a judge he wanted to be called something normal.

"Pop, you're gonna be okay," Wahoo would tell his father every morning. "Just hang in there."

Looking up with hound-dog eyes from the couch, Mickey Cray would say, "Whatever happens, I'm glad we ate that bleeping lizard."

On the day his dad had come home from the hospital, Wahoo had defrosted the dead iguana and made a peppercorn stew, which his mom had wisely refused to touch. Mickey had insisted that eating the critter that had dented his skull would be a spiritual remedy. "Big medicine," he'd predicted.

But the iguana had tasted awful, and Mickey Cray's headaches only got worse. Wahoo's mother was so concerned that she wanted Mickey to see a brain specialist in Miami, but Mickey refused to go.

Meanwhile, people kept calling up with new jobs, and Wahoo was forced to send them to other wranglers. His father was in no condition to work.

After school, Wahoo would feed the animals and clean out the pens and cages. The backyard was literally a zoo—gators, snakes, parrots, mynah birds, rats, mice, monkeys, raccoons, tortoises and even a bald eagle, which Mickey had raised from a fledgling after its mother was killed.

"Treat 'em like royalty," Mickey would instruct Wahoo, because the animals were quite valuable. Without them, Mickey would be unemployed.

It disturbed Wahoo to see his father so ill because Mickey was the toughest guy he'd ever known.

One morning, with summer approaching, Wahoo's mother took him aside and told him that the family's savings account was almost drained. "I'm going to China," she said.

Wahoo nodded, like it was no big deal.

"For two months," she said.

"That's a long time," said Wahoo.

"Sorry, big guy, but we really need the money."

Wahoo's mother taught Mandarin Chinese, an extremely difficult language. Big American companies that had offices in China would hire Mrs. Cray to tutor their top executives, but usually these companies flew their employees to South Florida for Mrs. Cray's lessons.

"This time they want me to go to Shanghai," she explained to her son. "They have, like, fifty people over there who learned Mandarin from some cheap audiotape. The other day, one of the big shots was trying to say 'Nice shoes!' and he accidentally told a government minister that his face looked like a butt wart. Not good."

"Did you tell Pop you're going?"

"That's next."

Wahoo slipped outside to clean Alice's pond. Alice the alligator was one of Mickey Cray's stars. She was twelve feet long and as tame as a guppy, but she looked truly ferocious. Over the years Alice had appeared often in front of a camera. Her credits included nine feature films, two National Geographic documentaries, a three-part Disney special about the Everglades and a TV commercial for a fancy French skin lotion.

She lay sunning on the mudbank while Wahoo skimmed the dead leaves and sticks from the water. Her eyes were closed, but Wahoo knew she was listening.

"Hungry, girl?" he asked.

The gator's mouth opened wide, the inside as white as spun cotton. Some of her teeth were snaggled and chipped. The tips were green from pond algae.

"You forgot to floss," Wahoo said.

Alice hissed. He went to get her some food. When she heard the squeaking of the wheelbarrow, she cracked her eyelids and turned her huge armored head.

Wahoo tossed a whole plucked chicken into the alligator's gaping jaws. The sound of her crunching on the thawed bird obscured the voices coming from the house—Wahoo's mother and father "discussing" the China trip.

Wahoo fed Alice two more dead chickens, locked the gate to the pond and took a walk. When he returned, his father was upright on the sofa and his mother was in the kitchen fixing bologna sandwiches for lunch.

"You believe this?" Mickey said to Wahoo. "She's bugging out on us!"

"Pop, we're broke."

Mickey's shoulders slumped. "Not that broke."

"You want the animals to starve?" Wahoo asked.

They ate their sandwiches barely speaking a word. When they were done, Mrs. Cray stood up and said: "I'm going to miss you guys. I wish I didn't have to go."

Then she went into the bedroom and shut the door.

Mickey seemed dazed. "I used to like iguanas."

"We'll be okay."

"My head hurts."

"Take your medicine," said Wahoo.

"I threw it away."

"What?"

"Those yellow pills, they made me constipated."

Wahoo shook his head. "Unbelievable."

"Seriously. I haven't had a satisfactory bowel movement since Easter."

"Thanks for sharing," said Wahoo. He started loading the dishwasher, trying to keep his mind off the fact that his mom was about to fly away to the far side of the world.

Mickey got up and apologized to his son.

"I'm just being selfish. I don't want her to go."

"Me neither."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 232 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(161)

4 Star

(42)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(13)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 232 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great read, a sure hit!

    Carl Hiaasen has done it again. Here is book that is still set in Florida, but the characters are universal. Meet Wahoo, the boy not the fish, son of Mickey Cray, animal wrangler. Together they join the cast of EXPEDITION SURVIVAL! to explore the wildlife of the Florida Everglades. Between the two of them, a dead alligator, a indignant bat, and a survivalist who can't - hilarity reigns. This is a great action filled book, especially a good read for those in late elementary school and middle school

    Highly recommended.

    51 out of 57 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 9, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Sink your teeth into this must read!

    This is sure to be another hit for Hiasen! Hiasen, who specializes in books that team his love of animals and Florida with high action and great writing, tells the tale of a boy named Wahoo (yes Wahoo) that you will not be able to put down. Wahoo's family, like many these days, is struggling financially. So when his father, an animal wrangler by trade, receives an offer to work on Expedition Survival! he can't turn it down. However due to a recent injury (due to an iguana falling from the sky) he needs help and that is where Wahoo comes in. The story of their escapades on a reality show that starts out with more humor than reality quickly takes you for a ride as the show's lead star insists on the show becoming more "real" in the Florida wetlands with all of its natural animals and dangers. Mix in the reality of Wahoo and his father trying to protect his friend Tuna (yes Tuna) from her abusive father and this books dynamic characters and capturing story will have you hoping that it does not end too soon and that they will all come out alive in the end. A must read for all fans of Hiasen's Hoot and Gordon Korman's Zoobreak series. Grades 4-8

    30 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2011

    Cant wait!!!

    I have read all of carl hiassens florida series and luv them all so much. My friends luv them too. So happy he's making another. Cant wait for it to come out!!! Will pre-order it. This is Nicole age 12 and in the 7th grade.

    18 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Psycho chicken

    Awesome book! Ive read all of the books and this one is the best books so far!!!!

    12 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Anonymous

    Love this book! I would recomend it. It is definetly not boring, i could never put it down. Great for middle school students like myself. If you like animals, wildlife, adventure, and action, then this is the book for you!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    CookoBird

    Not really feeling this book in the series. You can trust my reviews even though I am only THIRDTEEN, I read all Carls' books with this animal series but, this book changed subjects a bunch it seemed. Once you get to the third chapter it starts to stay on one topic. But, I guess it is a good book if you understand well like me....but if you have trouble focusing ad processing things quickly then please do NOT waste your money. Plus, I think this book for me was ten dollars and ninety-nine cents. So, its an okay book overall!

    7 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 24, 2012

    The book, Chomp, featured two main characters in the beginning.

    The book, Chomp, featured two main characters in the beginning. Mickey Cray is one of them and he has an interesting past. He has a major concussion because of an over population of iguanas and so when a big frost hit, it froze them in a tree but no one knew that and so when he sat under a tree one fell down and hit him over the head. He now suffers from a bad concussion and the vision of seeing double. The other character is his son Wahoo who helps and takes care of his father while his mother is in china earning money to take care of the hospital bill. But something that makes Wahoo and his father different than ordinary people is that they own a whole backyard full of funky critters that you would never dream to have in your backyard. As the story goes on, Mickey and his son, both animal wranglers, have an exciting event that could change their life forever. How about a big movie star named Derek Badger who is on a TV show called Expedition Survival, where he has to survive in the wilderness. His signature is to catch critters and eat them, but what makes this celebrity so important is that Mickey gets a job offer from them. Also in the story is a young girl named Tuna who ran away to the Everglades with Wahoo and his father for a video shoot for the show. Next, Derek Badgers true identity is exposed to many people. The true identity isn’t all that good and could cost Derek his job.
    I would recommend this book because it was very suspense filled like the photo shoot in the Everglades that always kept me in suspense. The book also told a brave story at the end and even a little lesson on child abuse that was truly and eye opener. Finally, I found the book to be filled with action like water boat high speed chases or just funny quotes.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2012

    Chomp

    Great author love his books

    6 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2013

    TY

    Awesom, I loved it, I read it every night for 1/2 an hour to an hour, a very funny yet mysterious book. GREAT JOB CARL! ( the book d0es include cursing kidz) :)

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2012

    Havent read it

    Wow ive read all the books i have a ton of friends in fl and can relate with the wild life i csnt wait to read it! But its soooo expensive but the cheapest then my schools catolog $15 and barnes and noble the store $25 So $10 is amaxing!

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Great

    I love carls books so intersting

    5 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent book

    Excellent book

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2012

    Chomp

    I think i'll like i because i liked his book Hoot

    5 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    Yes!!! Another one!!!

    I cant wait for this new book!!!! I love this sersies !!!!

    5 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2013

    Jan

    This book is awsome!!!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    One of his mericals

    The perfect book for book project. An amazing book that you can't put down!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 7, 2012

    This new realistic fiction novel by Carl Hiaasen continu

    This new realistic fiction novel by Carl Hiaasen continues his tradition of protecting the Floridian environment and strikes a tone with most young readers. I read this book because I have read all his other environmental novels, and I like how he finally writes a novel involving more alligators as they are the most recognizable Floridian species. Now even though it had some unoriginal jokes and some unbelievable scenes (such as the crew of the survival show actually paying attention to the main character even though he is 12 years old), it contains some material, like guns and alcoholism, aimed at higher audiences. This book would find its ground for middle schoolers as they are not too young or too old.
    The book starts off as the main character, Wahoo Cray, has to deal with his dad who sustained a concussion. This disrupts the family income as Mickey Cray is an animal wrangler. Things get worse for Wahoo as his mom, who teaches senior executives how to speak Mandarin, leaves to work in China over the summer. To get extra income Wahoo and Mickey sign a contract with the reality show Expedition Survival!, but soon start to dislike the show as its “Super Star”, Derek Badger, is a complete fake. As they are filming in the Everglades, Derek gets lost and they have to form a search party. Soon everyone gets lost and there is an interesting turn of events when they are about to get rescued.
    You will not put the book down as there are some cliffhangers that will keep you hooked. The book could use some improving, especially with the dialogue and some unbelievable scenes, but I would still recommend the novel if you’re in the mood to read something, but don’t plan on an in-depth read.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Teenager Wahoo Cray doesn¿t live the life of the average kid. H

    Teenager Wahoo Cray doesn’t live the life of the average kid. Having a
    dad who’s a wildlife wrangler with a private zoo, Wahoo has grown up
    with alligators, monkeys, birds of all sorts, giant tortoises, snakes,
    you name it. His dad, Mickey, hasn’t done much running of the business,
    though, since he got a concussion from being hit on the head by a
    falling iguana that died in a hard freeze. With money running low,
    Wahoo’s mom has gone to China on a two-month teaching job and she’s
    depending on Wahoo to keep an eye on his dad. Wahoo has always looked
    after all the animals, including a twelve-foot alligator named Alice
    with movie credits to her name, and he has—or actually doesn’t have—the
    missing thumb to prove it (he was showing off to a girl so he can hardly
    blame Alice). When he takes a call from Expedition Survival! looking for
    a place to shoot an episode of the reality TV show starring fake
    wrangler Derek Badger, Wahoo accepts the job on his dad’s behalf. After
    all, a thousand bucks a day plus animal rental fees is awfully hard to
    resist when you can’t pay the mortgage. Badger especially wants to
    shoot scenes with Alice and with Beulah, a fourteen-foot python with a
    penchant for biting (although she can be persuaded to let go with a slug
    of liquor). Who could predict that Derek would go missing in the
    Everglades after being bitten on the tongue by a bat that crashlanded
    into his cheesecake crumbs (of course, she wouldn’t have bitten him if
    he hadn’t tried to eat her for the camera) or that he would convince
    himself he was going to turn into a vampire? Misappropriated airboats, a
    drunk with a gun, and a kidnapped Mickey lead to more mayhem and there’s
    no one ready to come to the rescue except Wahoo and a girl named Tuna
    Gordon. Can they learn to drive an airboat to get there in time? Will
    Derek turn into a half-vampire because there’s a half-moon? Carl
    Hiaasen never fails to be entertaining and Chomp is no exception. It
    might be written for young middle-graders but adults will love all the
    action and craziness, too, and will sort of wish they could visit Wahoo
    and the family zoo.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2012

    Reading

    Im reading this currently so dont ruin anything for me! Kind of boring in the beggining but makes up for it in the end

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    Love it!!!!!!! I've read all of the his books! And my favorite is scat!!

    Carl Hiassin is a-w-e-s-o-m-e!!! He is an great author for children who love awesome stuff! He is very detailed and comes up with creative ideas with amazing gusto and grace!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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