Iggie's House

Iggie's House

4.0 25
by Judy Blume
     
 

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Iggie's house just wasn't the same. Iggie was gone, moved to Tokyo. And there was Winnie, cracking her gum on Grove Street, where she'd always lived, with no more best friend and two weeks left of summer.

Then the Garber family moved into Iggie's house — two boys, Glenn and Herbie, and Tina, their little sister. The Garbers were black and Grove Street was

Overview

Iggie's house just wasn't the same. Iggie was gone, moved to Tokyo. And there was Winnie, cracking her gum on Grove Street, where she'd always lived, with no more best friend and two weeks left of summer.

Then the Garber family moved into Iggie's house — two boys, Glenn and Herbie, and Tina, their little sister. The Garbers were black and Grove Street was white and always had been. Winnie, a welcoming committee of one, set out to make a good impression and be a good neighbor. That's why the trouble started.

Glenn and Herbie and Tina didn't want a "good neighbor." They wanted a friend.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Margaret Orto
Eleven year old Winnie Barringer is lonely. She has no one to play with for the rest of the summer. Her best friend Iggie has moved to Tokyo, far away from Grove Street in the New Jersey town where Winnie has always lived. When the Garber family moves into Iggie’s house, Winnie is thrilled that there are three kids. She is also surprised to learn that her new neighbors are black—the first in this previously all-white neighborhood. Winnie sets out to welcome them but soon realizes that she’s the only one. In fact, Mrs. Landon, a neighbor, circulates a petition to get rid of the new family. While her parents do not sign it, Winnie is confused by their ambivalent feelings about the Garbers. Meanwhile, she sticks her foot in her mouth with her new friends several times with some unintended racial slurs. She persists in her friendly relations, however, and is eventually accused by them of being a crusader. By the end, she and the Garber kids sort out the difference between friendships based on real connection rather than good race relations. While some of the terminology in the book is dated and the blatant racism portrayed has subsided, the issues of segregation raised are still relevant to today’s readers. Blume is at her strongest when she conveys Winnie’s confusion over adult behavior; especially effective is a letter to her friend Iggie that she writes as events unfold. This book, along with six other classic Blume titles for middle grade readers, is being reissued in 2014 with a newly illustrated and designed cover that is striking and sure to attract a new generation of readers. Reviewer: Margaret Orto; Ages 8 to 12.
Publishers Weekly
Judy Blume's body of work returns to her original editor, Richard Jackson, with the rerelease of four classics in hardcover. An African-American family moves to all-white Grove Street in Iggie's House, to be released in April. The author's breakthrough title, Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret, about 11-year old Margaret Simon's struggles with puberty and religion, is now available in hardcover as well as in a Spanish-language edition, Estas ahi Dios? Soy yo, Margaret. Two additional titles came out last season: Blubber takes on preteen teasing; and It's Not the End of the World explores the effects of divorce. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"The purpose is worthy, and the most perceptive aspect of the book is the interpretation of the reaction of the black family."--Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books.
School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—Winnie misses her best friend, Iggie, who moved with her family to Japan and mopes around the house in this novel by Judy Blume (Atheneum, 2002 rerelease). When she goes to see who moved into her friend's house, Winnie discovers a "Negro" family with three kids outside. She is excited to have her first "colored" neighbors, the Garbers. As Winnie befriends the family's children, the siblings are skeptical at first, and the eldest is perturbed that people always think they are from Africa, not Detroit. As Winnie gets to know the family, a busybody neighbor circulates a petition to households on Grove Street stating that "colored people" are not welcome in the neighborhood and that they must leave. As the tensions among neighbors mount, Winnie learns there is more to people than just the color of their skin as she discovers that, rather than focusing on being a good neighbor, she should just be a friend. Emily Janice Card provides superior narration, voicing the emotions of all the characters. Through the trials of one neighborhood, listeners learn about racial tension from a child's point of view.—Janet Weber, Tigard Public Library, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781481411042
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
04/29/2014
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
238,802
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
520L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Judy Blume’s books have won hundreds of awards. She is the recipient of the National Book Foundation’s Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She lives in Key West and New York City. You can visit her at www.judyblume.com.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New York's Upper East Side, Key West, and Martha's Vineyard
Date of Birth:
February 12, 1938
Place of Birth:
Elizabeth, New Jersey
Education:
B.S. in education, New York University, 1961
Website:
http://www.judyblume.com/

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3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Winnie is a smart, 11 year old girl with a tom boyish personality. When the African - American Garber family moves into Iggie's house, Winnie makes friends right away, but she's the only one. This is an amazing book. I loved it!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book that I am doing is Iggies House. I thought that it was a great book! The book was so great that I would like to read it again. The main charters were Winnie, Iggie, Glenn, Herbie, and Tina. Iggie had to move away so Winnie became sad. A Africam American family moved into Iggies old house. Winnie wanted to make friends with the new family. But how can the new family make good friends if they were the only African American family on the block. I would recamend this book to other kids because I thought it was easy and exciting to read. That was my book report on Iggies House.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Iggies House is a great book. For a book report we had to make a play of a scene in the book and I was Winnie. My group chose the scene when Ms.Landon tells the Barringers that Clarice and her are moving away because(in Ms. Landon's words)them. It was really hard to do ,but it was fun because we had a lot of out takes, but we had to practice a lot.I hope if you read it,you will like it as much as I did!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book because you can understand the feelings of all the characters in the book. It's a great book for all ages!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow this is a great book for 5th, 6th,& mabye7th graders The story line is very touching
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hate is all I can say.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thiis book was great it tells alot about freindships and it doesnt matter what you are
grannymikey More than 1 year ago
we have purchases several of your books with joy. However now that we know you openly support the genocide of babies by PPH we as a family of values can no longer support you. Sorry, it was good while it lasted, but you are now on the banned list.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good with very good messages!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was a very good book. It is a story about segregation, and hope, but by far most, it is a story about friendship and staying true to the people you care for, even when times are tough. Awesome book!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was ok but a littel weird. Because its talking about black peaple and there friend who is white. But the other way around! ;)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love it. It was a really good book and told me that everyone is the same. I hope you love it too.
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Why will thet talk about black ppl r they races cuz im black
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a boy and i read for school. The message was a great message, but, i wouldn't read it again
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am gonna read the whole thing a multiple times
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book It is wonderful