Mantissa

Mantissa

1.5 2
by John Fowles
     
 

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In Mantissa (1982), a novelist awakes in the hospital with amnesia — and comes to believe that a beautiful female doctor is, in fact, his muse.

Overview

In Mantissa (1982), a novelist awakes in the hospital with amnesia — and comes to believe that a beautiful female doctor is, in fact, his muse.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Fowles launched his career with The Collector, which was welcomed with great critical enthusiasm, including that of LJ's reviewer, who found it "a distinguished first novel" (LJ 8/63). Mantissa, on the other hand, was a departure from the author's more popular material and received only a marginal response (LJ 9/1/82).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316290272
Publisher:
Hachette Book Group
Publication date:
08/01/1997
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
1,371,988
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.48(d)

Meet the Author

John Fowles (1926-2005) was educated at Oxford and subsequently lectured in English at universities in Greece and the UK. The success of his first novel, The Collector, published in 1963, allowed him to devote all his time to writing. His books include the internationally acclaimed and bestselling novels The Magus, The French Lieutenant's Woman, and Daniel Martin. Fowles spent the last decades of his life on the southern coast of England in the small harbor town of Lyme Regis.

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1.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is about a stormy relationship between a man and his muse, unfortunately for the reader the main theme ends up being a self-absorbed battle of the sexes. A noble theme this might be, I wish I had the time back that I spent reading it. While the arguments between the two main characters may have been cutting edge back in 1982, most of the arguments seem outdated by todays standards of sexual freedom.