Nothing but Blue Skies

Nothing but Blue Skies

4.5 2
by Thomas McGuane
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Thomas McGuane's high-spirited and fiercely lyrical new novel chronicles the fall and rise of Frank Copenhaver, a man so unhinged by his wife's departure that he finds himself ruining his business, falling in love with the wrong women, and wandering the lawns of his neighborhood, desperate for the merest glimpse of normalcy.

The result is a ruefully funny novel

…  See more details below

Overview

Thomas McGuane's high-spirited and fiercely lyrical new novel chronicles the fall and rise of Frank Copenhaver, a man so unhinged by his wife's departure that he finds himself ruining his business, falling in love with the wrong women, and wandering the lawns of his neighborhood, desperate for the merest glimpse of normalcy.

The result is a ruefully funny novel of embattled manhood, set in the country that McGuane has made his own: a Montana where cowboys slug it out with speculators, a cattleman's best friend may be his insurance broker, and love and fishing are the only consolations that last.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Vibrant with the pleasures of ironic language, play and chase, and quick with broken-hearted humor...I've never been so moved to admire [McGuane's] work as in this story."

— William Kittredge,

Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Nothing but Blue Skies is nothing but enjoyable." — San Francisco Chronicle

"McGuane's prose is so dazzlingly acute and seemingly effortless that it infuses Nothing but Blue Skies with exuberance and wit." — Chicago Tribune.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
McGuane's uproarious novel about the misfortunes that befall a Montana real estate speculator when he is abandoned by his wife is American vernacular fiction at its best. (Feb.)
Beverly Lowry
I don't know of another writer who can walk Thomas McGuane's literary highwire. His vaunted dialogue has not been overpraised....He can describe the sky, a bird, a rock, the dawn, with such grace that you want to go out and see for yourself; and he can zip through things so funny it makes you laugh out loud. -- The New York Times
William Kittredge
Vibrant with the pleasure of ironic logic, play and faith, and equiped with broken-hearted humor...I've never been so moved to admire [McGuane's] work as in this story. -- Los Angeles Times Book Review
Kirkus Reviews
Ex-hippie and ex-druggie Montana businessman and cattle- rancher Frank Copenhaver is winding down: "the man who had always been just ahead of events was now slightly behind them." He's going broke, he's lost his wife, and his daughter is keeping company with a Montana-Firster fascist-type who is Frank's own age or thereabouts. Frank—as the good McGuane character he is—is given to outsized and far-fetched screw-ups and high-jinks, but error isn't saving him now. Nothing is. This errant yet debonair loser—McGuane's perpetual protagonist—gains something with age, though—as does McGuane. A lovely stylist always, McGuane has been handicapped by having to jab at a hip counterculture as silly as his own dandy-ish characters were. But now, with the passing of that counterculture, with only its relics like Frank Copenhaver left, it—like Frank—takes on poignancy, and McGuane is free to become a kind of American Kingsley Amis. Unloved and unwanted by the Zeitgeist (which prefers the Perot-like doings of the Montana-Firster), Frank is an unchained eye in a novel that shares the tang of liberation and is all over the map as he thinks, for example, now about McDonald's ("Americans had overtaken their product line, if he was any judge, waiting for McThis and McThat. If there were only a few departures or insights—McShit on the toilets, anything—it would be so much easier to take one's seat in this American meeting place and not feel such despair that the world was going on without you"), now about the disappeared drug-culture ("And what fun those darn drugs were. Marvelous worlds aslant, a personal speed wobble in the middle of a civilization equallyout of control. And it was wonderful, however short, to have such didactic views on everything, everyone coming down from the mountain with the tablets of stone. Hard to say what it all came to now. Skulls in the desert"). Funny, sad, deliciously written (albeit with dumb plot curlicues): McGuane's most amiable novel, perhaps his best.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679747789
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/1994
Series:
Vintage Contemporaries Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Nothing but Blue Skies 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I connected with the main character although we don't have much in common. McGuane did a good job of pulling me in, and I read it in one sitting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gtgtb good night!))