Weekend Knitting: 50 Unique Projects and Ideas

Weekend Knitting: 50 Unique Projects and Ideas

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by Melanie Falick
     
 

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When Weekend Knitting was first published in hardcover in 2003, a modern generation of knitters was just starting to discover this "hot new hobby." Since then, knitting has grown wildly popular and Melanie Falick’s book has gone on to become a knitting classic and a huge bestseller.

Weekend Knitting brings togetherSee more details below

Overview


When Weekend Knitting was first published in hardcover in 2003, a modern generation of knitters was just starting to discover this "hot new hobby." Since then, knitting has grown wildly popular and Melanie Falick’s book has gone on to become a knitting classic and a huge bestseller.

Weekend Knitting brings together unique, innovative, and still-fresh projects for beginning and more-experienced knitters, many of which can be completed in a weekend or less. Every project is presented with clear instructions and in beautiful photographs that celebrate idyllic weekend settings.

Quotes from diverse sources about knitting, creativity, and balanced living—along with favorite recipes, lists of books and movies with knitting scenes, and other extras—complete the weekend knitting experience.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453220832
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/13/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
437,532
File size:
28 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

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Weekend knitting

50 unique projects and ideas


By Melanie Falick, Ericka McConnell

Harry N. Abrams, Inc.

Copyright © 2003 Melanie Falick
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4532-2083-2



CHAPTER 1

home and hearth


reverse-bloom flower washcloths

CINDY TAYLOR


I knitted my first washcloth when a pattern for a round one sparked my interest. I didn't really think about using the washcloth. I just wanted to make something round, a shape I'd never tried to knit. Since then I have become a knitted-washcloth convert. At the end of a hectic day, I lather it up with soap, wash my face, and feel, at least for a moment, that I am doing something special for myself. It's amazing how something so seemingly inconsequential can actually have a profound effect (it nearly always compels me to take a deep, relaxing breath).

The flower shape of the cushy cotton chenille washcloths shown here is achieved in what you could call a reverse-bloom style: First you knit the five petals (blooms) in garter stitch, then you attach them to each other by knitting them together in the round; to finish, you work in Stockinette stitch, with gradual decreases, to the center.

This project can be worked entirely on double-pointed needles, but you can see the flower come to life nicely, and you can leave the petals on the circular needle as you complete them, if you begin with the circular needle and change to double-pointed needles when necessary.


Finished Measurements

10½" diameter, measured at widest point.


Yarn

Crystal Palace Cotton Chenille (100% cotton; 98 yards / 50 grams): 1 skein for each cloth.

Shown in #6320 green, #2054 pink, and #2230 orange.


Needles

16" circular (circ) needle size US 6 (4 mm).

One set double-pointed needles (dpn) size US 6 (4 mm), longer than 8" recommended.

Change needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.


Notions

Stitch marker, yarn needle, stitch holders or waste yarn (optional).


Gauge

16 sts and 26 rounds = 4" in Stockinette stitch (St st).


PETALS (make 5)

Using either circ or dpn, CO 11 sts.

ROW 1: Knit across all sts. For Rows 2–20, slip the last st of every row as if to purl with yarn in front, to create a smooth edge for the petal.

ROW 2: Insert the tip of the right-hand needle between the first 2 sts on the left-hand needle, draw up a loop, and place it on the left-hand needle—1st increased. Knit across all sts, slipping the last st of the row as given above.

ROWS 3, 4, AND 5: Repeat Row 2—15 sts after completing Row 5.

ROWS 6 AND 7: Knit across all sts, slipping last st as before.

ROWS 8 AND 9: Repeat Row 2—17 sts after completing Row 9.

ROWS 10 AND 11: Knit across all sts, slipping last st as before.

ROWS 12 AND 13: Repeat Row 2—19 sts after completing Row 13.

ROWS 14 AND 15: Knit across all sts, slipping last st as before.

ROWS 16 AND 17: Repeat Row 2—21 sts after completing Row 17.

ROWS 18, 19, AND 20: Knit across all sts, slipping last st as before.

ROW 21: Knit across all sts.


Break yarn, leaving an 8" tail. Make 4 more petals for a total of 5 petals. If using a circ needle, you can leave the petals on the cable part of the needle as you work the others. If using dpns, place petals on stitch holders or waste yarn.


FLOWER CENTER

Place all petals on circ needle or dpns with the yarn tail hanging at the same side of each petal. Join for working in the rnd (round), and place marker to indicate the beginning of rnd—105 sts. If beginning on circ needle, change to dpns when there are too few sts to continue using the circ.

RNDS 1, 2, AND 3: Knit all sts.

RND 4: *K2, k2tog; repeat from * around to last st, end k1—79 sts.

RNDS 5 AND 6: Knit all sts.

RND 7: *K2, k2tog; repeat from * to last 3 sts, end k3—60 sts.

RND 8 AND 9: Knit all sts.

RND 10: *K2, k2tog; repeat from * to end—45 sts.

RNDS 11 AND 12: Knit all sts.

RND 13: *K2, k2tog; repeat from * to last st, end k1—34 sts.

RNDS 14 AND 15: Knit all sts.

RND 16: *K1, k2tog; repeat from * to last st, end k1—23 sts.

RND 17: Knit all sts.

RND 18: *K1, k2tog; repeat from * to last 2 sts, end k2tog—15 sts.

RND 19: Knit all sts.

RND 20: K2tog around to last st, end k1—8 sts.

RND 21: BO all sts.

Weave in ends securely, weaving each end back on itself to ensure that it does not work loose. To block, saturate with water, pat gently into shape, and allow to air-dry.


Let me warn you that a genuine interest in knitting can keep you fascinated, eagerly pursuing it, and never satisfied, through a lifetime.

From Woman's Day Book of American Needlework, ROSE Wilder Lane, 1963


Taking a Bath

A nice way to complete a relaxing weekend of knitting—or to begin one if it has been a stressful week—is to take a peaceful soak in the tub. With a little forethought and minimal effort, the bath can be made especially comforting. From the following list or your own imagination, pick and choose a few special touches that will help you make the experience serene.

• Clean the bathroom, especially the tub.

• If necessary, turn up the heat in the bathroom a few minutes before you start running the water.

• Light some candles and place them in areas of the bathroom where they are steady and will not fall.

• Place fresh flowers in a vase in a safe spot where you will be able to see them while you are in the tub.

• Choose a large, very soft bath towel to wrap yourself in after the bath, plus a smaller, equally soft towel for drying yourself off. Place the towels within arm's reach of the tub. If you are not planning a long bath, before you enter the bath, place the towels in the dryer to warm up for a few minutes.

• Place your most comfortable bathrobe and slippers or cozy socks in the bathroom.

• Turn off the ringer on the telephone.

• Play music that suits your mood. Choose music that will last at least as long as the bath.

Check that the volume is at the level you like (without the noisy water running) before you get in the tub.

• Arrange a bath pillow in a comfortable spot in the tub.

• Place a sturdy chair or small bench within arm's reach of the tub. Place any small items you will need during the bath on the chair or bench. Consider a book, a journal and pen, a small knitting project, a beverage, and any special bath products you want to use.

• If desired, add bubble bath, bath salts, bath oils, flower petals, or other favorite bath products to the water.

• If other people are at home, ask not to be disturbed.

• Once you get in the tub, close your eyes and take some deep breaths to relax and clear your mind.


turtleneck egg cozies

KRISTIN NICHOLAS


Kristin Nicholas became interested in designing knitted soft-boiled egg sweaters—or cozies—after seeing one in World of Interiors, a toney British home-decorating magazine. Opposite is a Stockinette-stitch cozy. On page 17 are three other styles: garter stitch, seed stitch, and ribbed. If you find the idea of a sweater for your eggs too far-fetched, then make these as Christmas tree decorations or doll clothes, but before you nix the egg sweater idea completely, imagine sitting around the breakfast table with weekend guests and serving these up. They're sure to elicit, at the very least, a bit of interesting conversation or a lot of hearty laughter.


Finished Measurements

Approximately 7" chest circumference and 3½" from bottom edge to shoulder.


Yarn

Harrisville Designs Highland 2-ply Worsted (100% wool; 200 yards / 100 grams): 1 skein will make approximately 6 solid-color cozies. Shown in #66 melon (orange), #38 teak (brown), #35 chianti (magenta), #8 hemlock (dark green), #7 tundra (light green), #14 woodsmoke (light teal)


Needles

One set straight needles size US 5 (3.75 mm).

One set double-pointed needles (dpn) size US 5 (3.75 mm) for neckband.

Change needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge, although exact gauge is not essential for this project.


Notions

Stitch markers, stitch holders, yarn needle.


Gauge

16 sts and 27 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch (St st).


Basic Stockinette Cozy

Review notes on page 16 before beginning to knit. Shown in orange with light green and magenta flower, and light green with orange and magenta flower.


BACK AND FRONT

CO 15 sts and work in St st (see Notes) for 3½". On the next row, work neck opening as follows: Work 5 sts, sl (slip) next 5 sts to holder, using the backward loop method (see Notes) CO 5 sts for back of neck, work last 5 sts. Work even in St st until piece measures 7" from the beginning. BO all sts.


SLEEVES

Measure up 2" from bottom of sweater at both sides of front and back and place markers.

Join yarn, and with RS facing, pick up and knit 12 sts between a pair of markers for sleeve. Work in St st for 3 rows, ending with a WS row. Decrease 1 st at each side of next row—10 sts. Work 3 rows even. Decrease 1 st at each side of next row—8 sts. Work even until sleeve measures 3½" from pickup row. BO all sts. Repeat for other sleeve.


NECKBAND

Join yarn at side of neck opening, ready to work the sts on the front holder. Using dpn, knit across 5 sts from holder, pick up and knit 1 st at side of neck opening, pick up and knit 5 sts across back of neck, pick up and knit 1 st at side of neck opening—12 sts. Join for working in the rnd (round) and place marker to indicate the beginning of rnd. Work in either k1, p1 rib (as shown on orange sweater) or St st in Rounds (see Notes, as shown on light green sweater) for 7 rnds. Purl one rnd. BO all sts as if to purl on next rnd.


FINISHING

Sew sleeve and side seams, reversing seam at lower end of sleeve for 1" for cuff. Fold up lower end of each sleeve for cuffs. If desired, embroider the front of cozy with a lazy daisy flower with French knot center (see diagrams in Notes). Weave in ends.


Striped Garter-Stitch Cozy

Worked in light (L) and dark (D) stripes, with contrasting (C) neckband; shown in light teal and brown stripes with magenta.


BACK AND FRONT

With L, CO 13 sts. Knit 1 row. Change to D. *Knit 2 rows D, knit 2 rows L; repeat from * until seven 2-row stripes of D have been completed. On the next row, work neck opening as follows: With L, k4, sl (slip) next 5 sts to holder, using the backward loop method (see Notes) CO 5 sts for back of neck, k4. Next row: Knit with L. Continue stripe pattern and work even until seven 2-row stripes of D have been completed after the neck opening. Change to L and knit 1 row. With L, BO as if to knit on the next row.


SLEEVES

Measure up 8 stripes from bottom of sweater at both sides of front and back and place markers. Using L, with RS facing, pick up and knit 13 sts between a pair of markers for sleeve. Knit 1 row with L. Change to D and work even in 2-row garter st stripes for 4 rows, ending with a WS row. Continuing stripe pattern, decrease 1 st at each side of next row— 11 sts. Work even until four 2-row stripes of D have been completed. Change to L and knit 1 row. With L, BO as if to knit on the next row. Repeat for other sleeve.


NECKBAND

Join C at side of neck opening, ready to work the sts on the front holder. Using dpn, knit across 5 sts from holder, pick up and knit 1 st at side of neck opening, pick up and knit 5 sts across back of neck, pick up and knit 1 st at side of neck opening—12 sts. Join for working in the rnd (round) and place marker to indicate the beginning of rnd. Work in St st in Rounds (see Notes) for 7 rnds. Purl one rnd. BO all sts as if to purl on next rnd.


FINISHING

Sew sleeve and side seams. Weave in ends.


Ribbed Cozy

Shown in magenta and light teal.


BACK AND FRONT

CO 16 sts and work in k2, p2 rib (see Notes) for 3½". On the next row, work neck opening as follows: Work 5 sts, sl (slip) next 6 sts to holder, using the backward loop method (see Notes) CO 6 sts for back of neck, work last 5 sts. Work even in k2, p2 rib until piece measures 7" from the beginning. BO all sts in rib.


SLEEVES

Measure up 2" from bottom of sweater at both sides of front and back and place markers.

Join yarn, and with RS facing, pick up and knit 12 sts between a pair of markers for sleeve. Work in seed st (see Notes) for 3 rows, ending with a WS row. Decrease 1 st at each side of next row—10 sts. Work 3 rows even. Decrease 1 st at each side of next row—8 sts. Work even until sleeve measures 2½" from pickup row. BO all sts. Repeat for other sleeve.


NECKBAND

Join yarn at side of neck opening, ready to work the sts on the front holder. Using dpn, knit across 6 sts from holder, then pick up and knit 6 sts across back of neck—12 sts. Join for working in the rnd (round) and place marker to indicate the beginning of rnd. Work in seed st for 1". BO all sts in pattern on next rnd.


FINISHING

Sew sleeve and side seams, reversing seam at lower end of sleeves for 1" for cuffs. Fold up lower end of each sleeve for cuffs. Weave in ends.


Seed-Stitch Cozy

Shown in dark green.


BACK AND FRONT

CO 15 sts and work in seed st (see Notes) for 3½". On the next row, work neck opening as follows: Work 5 sts, sl (slip) next 5 sts to holder, using the backward loop method (see Notes)

CO 5 sts for back of neck, work last 5 sts. Work even in seed st until piece measures 7" from the beginning. BO all sts.


SLEEVES

Measure up 2" from bottom of sweater at both sides of front and back and place markers. Join yarn, and with RS facing, pick up and knit 13 sts between a pair of markers for sleeve. Work in seed st for 3 rows, ending with a WS row. Decrease 1 st at each side of next row—11 sts. Work 3 rows even. Decrease 1 st at each side of next row—9 sts. Work even until sleeve measures 2½" from pickup row. BO all sts. Repeat for other sleeve.


NECKBAND

Join yarn at side of neck opening, ready to work the sts on the front holder. Using dpn, knit across 5 sts from holder, pick up and knit 1 st at side of neck opening, pick up and knit 5 sts across back of neck, pick up and knit 1 st at side of neck opening—12 sts. Join for working in the rnd (round) and place marker to indicate the beginning of rnd. Work in St st in Rounds (see Notes) for 7 rnds. Purl one rnd. BO all sts as if to purl on next rnd.


FINISHING

Sew sleeve and side seams, reversing seam at lower end of sleeves for 1" for cuffs. Fold up lower end of each sleeve for cuffs. Weave in ends.


A SOFT-BOILED EGG

For the Cozy

Turtleneck Egg Cozy designer Kristin Nicholas knows a lot about eggs thanks to the exotic chickens she raises in her backyard. She starts nearly every day, rain or shine, by walking out to the coop and collecting the eggs from the hens' nests. When I asked her how she makes her soft-boiled eggs, she started by giving me this interesting explanation about gauging an egg's freshness: When submerged in water, the freshest eggs will sink to the bottom and lay on their sides horizontally; as the eggs age, they will begin to "stand up" vertically; and a very old egg will rise to the surface and float.

1 or more fresh eggs
Water


Bring enough water to cover the egg(s) to a gentle boil in a saucepan that is large enough to hold the egg(s) without crowding. Using a clean, sharp sewing needle or pin, poke a hole through the broad end of each egg (this will keep the shells from cracking due to the pressure of the white expanding inside); it takes only a small amount of force to make the hole.

Place the egg(s) on a large spoon or other cupped utensil and gently lower into the boiling water (the idea is to keep the eggs from knocking against each other or the saucepan to prevent them from cracking from the contact). Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, depending on how runny you like the yoke. With the spoon, transfer to an egg cup and cover with a cozy to keep warm.

When ready to eat, remove the cozy and crack the egg shell horizontally (still in the cup) with a knife about ½" down from the top of the egg. Lift the top shell and with a spoon eat the white that is inside of it. Eat the remainder of the egg out of the shell in the cup.

Note: If you want to make a medium- or hard-boiled egg (generally not served in a cozy), boil the egg between 5 and 15 minutes. After removing the egg from the water, run it under cold water, then peel away the shell.


notes

* The body of each cozy is worked from the lower front, up and over the shoulders, to the lower back. A neck opening is created at the shoulder line as you go.

* Stockinette Stitch in Rows (St st)

ROW 1 AND ALL ODD-NUMBERED ROWS: (RS) Knit all sts.

ROW 2 AND ALL EVEN-NUMBERED ROWS: (WS) Purl all sts.

Repeat these 2 rows for pattern.

* Stockinette Stitch in Rounds (St st)

ALL ROUNDS (RNDS): Knit all sts every rnd.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Weekend knitting by Melanie Falick, Ericka McConnell. Copyright © 2003 Melanie Falick. Excerpted by permission of Harry N. Abrams, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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