31 Bond Street: A Novel

31 Bond Street: A Novel

by Ellen Horan

Paperback

$13.49 $14.99 Save 10% Current price is $13.49, Original price is $14.99. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Wednesday, February 26
MARKETPLACE
25 New & Used Starting at $1.99

Overview

“The skill with which Ellen Horan has braided true crime with thoughtful novelizing is pure pleasure.… Caleb Carr meets Scott Turow. What could possibly be better?”
— Beverly Swerling, author of City of God

“An impressive blend of imagination and history as it vividly brings to life one of New York’s City’s most notorious crimes. Ellen Horan has written a novel that, once begun, will be difficult for any reader to put down.” — Ron Rash, New York Times bestselling author of Serena

31 Bond Street, an unforgettable literary debut from Ellen Horan, is based on the true story of a brutal murder, a desperate mother and mistress, and the vicious constraints of 19th century society. Fans of Caleb Carr’s The Alienist, Edith Wharton’s The House of Myrth, and John Berendt’s Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil will love the stunning prose and beautiful imagery of 31 Bond Street.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061773976
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 03/01/2011
Series: P.S. Series
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 380,556
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Ellen Horan has worked as a studio artist and as a photo editor for magazines and books in New York City. She lives in downtown Manhattan, the setting of her first novel.

What People are Saying About This

Ron Rash

“31 BOND STREET is an impressive blend of imagination and history as it vividly brings to life one of New York’s City’s most notorious crimes. Ellen Horan has written a novel that, once begun, will be difficult for any reader to put down.”

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

31 Bond Street 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 55 reviews.
TWTaz More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this story and found myself drawn in page by page. With an interesting cast of characters, this book really kept me guessing until the end. I was a little let down by the resolution of the story, but the reading journey getting there was well worth the time to invest in this book. Great depiction of the times, which certainly made me happy that I didn't live in that time period! Anyone who enjoys historical mysteries should like this book.
Ronrose More than 1 year ago
I know you've heard it before, but this is a real page turner. It is a fictionalized account of a truly brutal murder that made headlines for more than three months in New York during 1857. In this pre-Civil War era, there was already plenty of intrigue concerning the gross treatment of women, the working class, and free blacks and runaway slaves. All of which made up a substantial part of the population of New York. To say that corruption in the local government was running rampant would be an understatement. Drop into this simmering pot a savage murder of a seemingly respectable dentist in his locked house; swindled business partners; alienated relatives; a sexy widow, who was his housekeeper and possible lover; politicians with their own agendas; a missing black man who was the victim's coachman, and you have a great story. The author skillfully leads the reader through a did she or didn't she kill her lover scenario. The preparations for the trial of the mistress and its subsequent revelations are counter played against glimpses of the events that lead up to the murder which took place at 31 Bond Street. Although Mrs Cunningham is the prosecution's focus for the crime, there is certainly no lack of alternate suspects. A very skillfully executed historical murder mystery.
TheCrowdedLeaf on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In 1857 a man named Harvey Burdell, a seemingly upstanding New York dentist, was brutally murdered in the middle of the night. His throat was sliced, nearly severing his head, and he was fiercely stabbed several times through his back and chest. The crime scene was bloody, but no evidence of the murder weapon or culprit was ever found. Living on the upper floors of Burdell¿s wealthy 31 Bond Street townhouse are the widow Emma Cunningham and her children. As the only household member with motive present at the time of Burdell¿s death, Emma became the prime suspect and the victim of a witch-hunt-like prosecution.Over 150 years later Ellen Horan, wandering through scrap bins in a print shop, comes across an old newspaper article with an etching of the avenue of Bond Street, showing a crowd of people milling around number 31. Intrigued, Horan researches the story regarding the murder, and skillfully puts down on paper a tale of intrigue, suspense, betrayal, and murder. All set in the bustling town of New York amid slave-trade scandals and the high-class expectations of the wealthy.Well crafted, with experienced execution, 31 Bond Street is a delicious debut novel that exhibits the author¿s talent with an intriguing narrative. Told in a non-linear fashion, we begin on February 1, 1857, the day after the murder, and then go back in time seven months to follow Emma Cunningham, her two daughters, and the path they took to wind up on Bond Street under the roof of Harvey Burdell. Horan switches back and forth, tantalizingly leading us up to the actual murder, but leaving us frothing with questions as she nimbly skips forward to the trial at hand.The way Horan chose to portray the characters is realistic and believable. Harvey Burdell is painted as a charming bachelor at first, but a seedy background and double-handed schemes soon darken his portrait. Henry Clinton, Emma¿s lawyer, is compassionate and dedicated, seceding from his prestigious law firm to defend Emma. Additional characters such as Samuel, the near-slave coachman, and John, the poor scrap of a house boy, add to the legitimacy of the time period and elicit our emotional connection with the novel. Emma herself is a mystery, at times I sympathized for her plight, at others I questioned her bad decisions and naiveté.In all, I was swept away in a believable interpretation of what could actually have happened back in 1857. Horan displays a fine skill at weaving historical fiction, as well as a murder mystery with believable scenarios. I am definitely interested to see what genre she should choose to write next.4 stars(I received this book from the author for review)
Soniamarie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I am writing this even tho I have 50 pages left in order to be sure I don't reveal anything I shouldn't. This is by far one of the best books of 2010 and I can honestly state that just a mere two months into the year. I have not been able to put the book down. It's like an episode of Law and Order in 1857. The book goes back and forth between the trial in 1857 following the lawyer, Mr. Clinton and the the summer and fall of 1856 following the suspect, Emma and her dealings with the murder victim, Dr. Burdell. Was she mistress or wife? Was she a gold digger? Who was really supposed to die? Who killed Dr. Burdell? Enter the early days of Manhatten and shady business deals and the risky world of real estate and scam artists to find out... Fabulous look at the way the law was played out back then. Wow. Thank goodness there have been changes to our constitution since then. It didn't look as tho Emma was going to get a fair trial there for a while as the coroner took over the case and placed her under house arrest and did not permit her to see a lawyer, nor her daughters. I encourage readers to read the author's excerpt regarding how she came across the idea for this book. That page is just as intriguing as the story itself. Highly recommended for mystery and historical fiction lovers alike.
jo-jo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
31 Bond Street is an intriguing mystery that opens after a murder has taken place. Harvey Burdell is a New York dentist that is found by his young servant boy John, after he is brutally murdered. We are given the events from the last year throughout this novel that give us clues as to how Harvey could have met his demise.When the police and coroner arrive at the scene of the crime we are introduced to Emma Cunningham. At first glance Emma appears to be the woman in charge of the Burdell household, making sure that daily operations run smoothly. But after further investigation it appears that there may have been an intimate relationship between Burdell and Cunningham, possibly even a marriage? Although I really did not like the character of Emma, by the end of the book I found her to be a strong woman that needed to do what was necessary to protect the interests of herself and her daughters.I found the legal process and the investigation from this period of time to be the most interesting part of the book for me. When the coroner arrived at the Burdell residence he basically took control of the crime scene and held Emma Cunningham prisoner in the home for weeks as he conducted his investigation. Emma somehow was able to get a message out to a lawyer, and that is how we are introduced to Henry Clinton, who happens to be a lawyer working for a high-profile law firm in New York. Henry finds himself putting everything on the line in order to represent Emma, in hopes that it will pay off for him in the future.Besides being a dentist, we learn that Burdell had many other financial transactions in the works. He purchased and sold land that wasn't necessarily on the up and up, which put him in the midst of transactions that turned out to be managed by politicians that are trying to put a hault to the progress being made by the underground railroads. As the coroner is focusing on Emma Cunningham as a suspect, it seems that Burdell's illegal transactions may be overlooked.This was an interesting story that was full of history about the law, politics, and the underground railroad. It was also a good mystery as bits and pieces are revealed in a way that kept me from putting this book down. I felt that I really didn't get a chance to know the characters well, so that was really the only downfall for me with this book, as I really enjoyed the writing. So if you are looking for a good mystery with a glimpse of what the legal system was like during this time period I think you would really enjoy this book.
bookappeal on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When Dr. Harvey Burdell is found violently murdered in his fine New York home at 31 Bond Street in 1857, the lady of the house, Emma Cunningham, becomes the main suspect. Recently widowed, nearly broke, and desperate to secure her financial future, Emma cunningly caught Burdell's attention several months ago and accepted the best deal he was inclined to offer. For her services as housemistress (and with the potential for marriage at a later date), Emma received free room and board and a respectable address at which to present two teenage daughters to potential suitors. Now sequestered in their home during the highly-publicized Coroner's inquest, Emma delivers a plea for legal representation to Mr. Henry Clinton, champion of the underdog. Over the objections of his loving wife, Henry takes the case, relishing the chance to argue against the arrogant and politically ambitious DA, Oakey Hall. Unfortunately, Burdell's Negro coach driver, who likely has information proving Emma's innocence, has disappeared. Flashbacks to the evolution of Emma and Burdell's relationship, their questionable land investments, and the events immediately preceding his murder build and maintain suspense throughout the novel. Based loosely on newspaper accounts of a real murder, Horan tangibly re-creates the sights, sounds, and dirty dealings of pre-Civil War New York. For fans of The Alienist by Caleb Carr and those who liked the murderous plot more than the architectural achievements of The Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen.
booksandbutter on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I did not like this book. I found it boring, unorganized, and not even worth finishing. I read 1/3 of the book, and just couldn't finish it. I did not even care to see what happened to the characters. I really wanted to like this book, unfortunately I did not.
Ronrose1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I know you've heard it before, but this is a real page turner. It is a fictionalized account of a truly brutal murder that made headlines for more than three months in New York during 1857. In this pre-Civil War era, there was already plenty of intrigue concerning the gross treatment of women, the working class, and free blacks and runaway slaves. All of which made up a substantial part of the population of New York. To say that corruption in the local government was running rampant would be an understatement. Drop into this simmering pot a savage murder of a seemingly respectable dentist in his locked house;swindled business partners; alienated relatives; a sexy widow, who was his housekeeper and possible lover; politicians with their own agendas; a missing black man who was the victim's coachman, and you have a great story. The author skillfully leads the reader through a did she or didn't she kill her lover scenario. The preparations for the trial of the mistress and its subsequent revelations are counter played against glimpses of the events that lead up to the murder which took place at 31 Bond Street. Although Mrs Cunningham is the prosecution's focus for the crime, there is certainly no lack of alternate suspects. A very skillfully executed historical murder mystery.
Kasthu on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
31 Bond Street is the fictional story of a real murder. Dr. Harvey Burdell is a respected dental surgeon in New York, who meets Emma Cunningham, a widow, in Saratoga, in the summer of 1856. After beginning a relationship with her, he invited her and her daughters to live with him at his home on Bond Street. When things soured between them, and Dr. Burdell was brutally murdered in his office, Emma was the first suspect. Henry Clinton, one of the foremost lawyers in the United States, was hired to defend her, in one of the most sensational murder trials of the mid-19th century.The book is told in two different ways: first there¿s the ¿present day¿ stand, which covers the events after the body of Dr. Burdell was discovered by his servants; and the second, which takes the reader from Dr. Burdell and Emma¿s first meeting. The description on the back of this book describes it as being like Caleb Carr¿s work; while I think this book is good, I don¿t think it¿s quite at the level of The Alienist, or its sequel, Angel of Darkness (there¿s a lot more psychological stuff in those two books, which I highly recommend if you¿re interested in the period). But, like in Caleb Carr's books, here mid-19th century New York is described in vivid detail. Lots of research and in-depth descriptions of the sights, sounds, and smells of the time make this an enjoyable read. The murder and trial are of course the focal points of the book, but I do love books that make New York City a living, breathing character, too.And that leads me to another thing I really liked about this book: the trail scenes themselves. The author apparently learned about the subject matter of this book by reading about it the way that a nineteenth century person would have¿by reading newspaper articles, and then researching the story from there. Henry Clinton as a character gets lost a bit in the shuffle (but who wouldn¿t), but Emma Cunningham herself is the star of this book. I¿m not quite sure that I like how the mystery was wrapped up, but I can see why the author had things turn out the way they do. The story is told from Emma¿s point of view, but you never really know until the end what will happen, or what kind of person Emma really is. So what is she: innocent victim or a cold murderer?I really enjoyed the story, but there was a lot the author left out, or put in that didn¿t necessarily need to be there (Clinton¿s wife, for example; he didn¿t marry until long after the events of this book took place, but the author has him married here¿not for any reason I can see). Also, apparently, Emma pretended she was pregnant during the trial, and there was another boarder at 31 Bond Street who was involved in the case¿ interesting little details that I would have liked to have seen here. Still, as I¿ve said, I really enjoyed this wonderful novel about nineteenth century New York.
maryintexas39 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
31 Bond Street did not live up to it's hype. I so wanted to be blown away by this one, but, alas, I wasn't.
knittingmomof3 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
From My Blog...In 1857, Dr. Harvey Burdell of 31 Bond Street, New York, was murdered in his home and the case was never solved, becoming the basis for Ellen Horan¿s historical fiction book 31 Bond Street. In Horan¿s version she writes of the bumbling coroner Connelly, a fevered press leading to mobs of people out for vengeance, a slipshod investigation and Hall, the District Attorney who needs an expeditious conviction as he has higher political aspirations. The surest conviction would be to place the blame on Dr. Burdell¿s driver, Samuel, yet he has vanished, most likely in fear of the Fugitive Slave Act so the powers that be turned to their next best suspect, the housemistress, Mrs. Emma Cunningham, widower and mother to two daughters. While under house detention, Emma pens a letter to Henry Clinton, a defense attorney who, against his wife¿s advice, decides to take her case with the aid of young John, who worked for Dr. Burdell and can freely leave the house. John soon becomes Clinton¿s eyes and ears. Horan weaves together a fascinating tale of a city growing, unrest in the country over slavery, the abuse of power, greed, indiscretion, and infidelity. 31 Bond Street is filled with actual copies of the newspaper clipping and while some of the book is historical fact other parts are pure conjecture. Horan paints a vivid, if not depressing, image of the ever growing trade town, the division of the haves and have nots, and the lengths people will go to for their own personal gain. The narrative is split primarily between Emma and Clinton. Emma takes the reader back to when she first met Dr. Burdell to present day whereas Henry Clinton speaks of the present and the investigation. While 31 Bond Street is a fictionalised historical mystery, a good portion of the book is spent in the courtroom as well as showing the reader New York society in 1857. It is interesting to see how the laws and procedures have changed over the past two centuries. While the characters are described in detail, I felt little for any save Henry, Elizabeth, and John. 31 Bond Street is an engaging mystery, with a page turning courtroom drama and some extraordinary twists and turns along the way, culminating in an explosive ending. I recommend 31 Bond Street to anyone looking for an exciting historical fiction mystery with courtroom drama.
thetometraveller on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Amidst a horrendous winter storm in February, 1857, prominent New York dentist Harvey Burdell is violently murdered in his room at his home. The doors and windows were all locked and suspicion immediately falls on Emma Cunningham, a pretty widow with two teen aged daughters who had recently become Dr. Burdell's housekeeper. When she produces a marriage certificate dated two weeks prior to the murder which shows that she secretly became Dr. Burdell's wife, the suspicion is only heightened.As the coroner begins what seems to be a completely biased inquest, Emma finds an ally in defense attorney Henry Clinton. He is inspired to help Emma when he sees that the powerful district attorney is set upon prosecuting Mrs. Cunningham despite nothing but circumstantial evidence.However, nothing and no one is what they seem in this complicated case. Dr. Burdell is far from the upstanding citizen that he appeared to be and practically everyone involved has an ulterior motive of some kind. Unravelling the tangle reveals an exciting and absorbing tale.The detail of nineteenth century New York and the excellent trial depiction made this one of the most enjoyable crime novels that I have read. Ellen Horan does an superb job of capturing the flavor and turmoil of the years just before the beginning of the Civil War.
jmchshannon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
With 31 Bond Street, Ms. Horan presents the reader with historical fiction at its finest. It is a story that is quite literally "ripped from the headlines", with those headlines first printed in the 1850s. A real-life murder mystery, Ms. Horan does an excellent job of filling in the blanks, imagining the story behind the headlines and fleshing out characters that have long since been forgotten. Through her skill, the reader gets the pleasure of enjoying a well-written of literary fiction with enough fact interspersed to make the story truly compelling.The story unfolds methodically, switching narrators to allow new evidence to come to light. As a result, the reader never gets the chance to understand the full story until late in the novel, at which point in time the reader has become fully absorbed in the story. This switching of narrators, the back and forth battle for information, and the methodical "follow the evidence" approach to solving the mystery enhances the power of perception, which in turn leaves the reader waffling back and forth in one's sympathies for the various characters. Enhancing the overall story is the addition of photographs of the real headlines from the actual murder. This drives home the fact that this is one story in which the historical aspect of the story outweighs the fiction. Ms. Horan does an excellent job of bringing to live long-dead characters - Henry vs. Harvey, Elisabeth vs. Emma. Her descriptions are breath-taking and exact, allowing the reader to clearly understand what it was like to live in 1850s New York. The political undertone behind the murder itself remind the reader the tension that existed before the Civil War erupted. These all combine to create characters that pull a reader's sympathies in various directions, rooting for one character versus another. Emotional involvement is always the hallmark of a well-written book, and 31 Bond Street meets that mark.One of the most appealing aspects of the story are the questions remaining at the end. Did Emma, and all of the characters, get their just rewards for their actions? Where did each character go wrong? Could this entire situation have been avoided under similar circumstances? Ms. Horan could easily have addressed some of these questions in her novel but rather leaves them for the reader to ponder. As with the emotional involvement, this is an added benefit that enhances the entire novel. Murder, mystery, intrigue, politics, a lush backdrop and rich setting combine to create an amazingly vivid, compelling novel. However, 31 Bond Street is not just for historical fiction lovers. Its study of criminal investigations and pre-Civil War detective work makes it a novel for fans of detective and suspense stories. Its mass appeal will make 31 Bond Street a story for the summer and beyond.
LiteraryFeline on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When Dr. Harvey Burdell, a New York dentist, is found brutally murdered in his own home, behind locked doors, suspicion immediately falls on those in the household, particularly Emma Cunningham whose sudden production of a secret marriage certificate between her and the doctor two weeks before the murder raises eyebrows and puts her innocence in doubt. Emma is a woman who is desperate to hang onto the last vestige of her social status, both for her daughters' sake as well as her own. She is near broke and facing eviction when she first meets Dr. Burdell. Dr. Burdell seems like a gentleman through and through. Only, he isn't nearly as perfect as he seems. As the investigation into his murder unfolds, it becomes clear that Dr. Burdell had many secrets and just as many enemies.With the media, public opinion, and the ambitious district attorney, Abraham Oakley Hall, already poised to hang Emma, Henry Clinton steps in to defend her. He puts his own career on the line to do so.Ellen Horan's novel, 31 Bond Street, is lush with detail. The mystery is tightly woven, at times intense, and always interesting. The story went in several unexpected directions. I had my theories, but nothing was quite as simple as it seemed. The narrative follows events as they unfold from the moment the body is discovered and is interspersed with flashbacks to the months before the murder, offering insight into the characters lives and motivations. New York was a character of its own: the bustling streets, the spreading out of a city, the back alleys and the upper class neighborhoods. I felt as if I was right there in the middle of the events as they transpired.I hadn't realized when I first began reading 31 Bond Street that it was based on a true crime that took place in 1875 New York. In a way, I'm glad I didn't know as I might have been tempted to run and look up the story before finishing the novel. While that isn't always a bad thing, I've found, this is one book I preferred to go into blind. I look forward to reading more by Ellen Horan in the future.
writestuff on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Back in early February 1857 a well-known dentist, Dr. Harvey Burdell, was discovered dead on the floor of his New York city office¿his throat cut ear to ear, nearly severing the head from the body. The murder immediately captured the imaginations of the press, making front page news and being declared the ¿crime of the century.¿ As lurid details emerged of Burdell¿s relationship with Emma Cunningham, a widow living with her two daughters on the top floor of Burdell¿s home, the focus of the prosecution was narrowed. Emma Cunningham was arrested and charged with the crime.It is these details which aroused the curiosity of writer Ellen Horan and formed the basis of her first novel 31 Bond Street. Horan opens the book with the murder, then takes the reader back and forth in time to flush out the characters and plot. The book is narrated from two points of view. Emma Cunningham¿s voice is mostly from the past, sketching out the details of how she meets Burdell and ends up moving into his home. It is through Emma that Horan creates the fictional components of the book ¿ imagining what must have occurred between her and Burdell and giving insight into the events leading up to the murder.Horan balances her novel with the voice of Henry Clinton ¿ the lawyer who Cunningham employed to defend her. Clinton¿s point of view allows the reader to peer into the mind of the defense attorney as he develops his case, and also takes us into the thrilling atmosphere of the courtroom.Throughout the book, Horan adds colorful and accurate detail of time and place, successfully capturing the streets of nineteenth-century New York. She intersperses real newspaper quotes about the murder and trial as well which lends authenticity to this fictional work. The recreated sounds of the press were wonderful.My favorite part of the novel was the trial itself. I purposefully did not read the true account because I did not want to know the outcome of the trial until I read it in the book. And I¿m glad I did that as it made the novel more suspenseful and captivating for me.Thematically, Horan explores the role of women in nineteenth century society, the racial undertones which reverberated in the pre-Civil war era, and the impact of the press in criminal cases. Her ability to intertwine all of these themes with the core plot of the book makes this not only a crime fiction novel, but an historical fiction book that brings this time in history to life.If you have not yet figured it out, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel from start to finish. Readers who love historical fiction and also enjoy a good mystery or crime novel, will want to pick up a copy of this book and read it. 31 Bond Street is impeccably researched and expertly written.Highly recommended.
Twink on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Oh, can I tell you how much I loved 31 Bond Street by Ellen Horan! Horan first got the story idea when she came across an actual newspaper page from 1857 in a print shop. It detailed the murder of Dr. Harvey Burdell, found dead at 31 Bond Street in New York City. Horan became fascinated with investigating the case and devoured the newspapers of the time. She has skillfully taken a sensational murder and fictionalized it, using many of the actual parties.Harvey Burdell's nearly decapitated body is discovered by his young servant boy. No one living in the house claims to have heard a thing. Suspicion quickly falls on Emma Cunningham, Burdell's housekeeper. The city Cornoner immediately takes control, completely sequestering Emma and her two daughters. I found this piece of law fascinating. The Coroner had the right to run the case as he saw fit. The murder scene effectively became a courtroom, with a jury brought in and questioning of witnesses taking place in the home. The press were allowed full access and often took notes for the police.Horan has created a winning character in lawyer Henry Clinton, who takes on Emma Cunningham as a client. He is dogged and idealistic, willing to use and pursue new forensic methods just coming into practice. I also enjoyed the relationship between Clinton and his wife Elisabeth, as it was much different than social mores would have dictated at the time.The novel alternates between the present day with Henry Clinton as narrator and what led up to the murder from Emma Cunningham's point of view. We learn a little bit more each time we go back and forth. What Henry and Emma believe aren't quite the same thing. I really enjoyed this format.Horan's research is meticulous. The details of police work, the law, society, language, mores and New York City itself are captivating. Issues of the time, including slavery and politics also figure into the plot.For me 31 Bond Street was an absolutely delicious read, combining suspense, mystery and history into a page turner. I was surprised to learn that this was a debut novel. But glad to hear Horan is researching her next.
riverwillow on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is an interesting imagining of the events surrounding the murder of Dr Harvey Burdell in New York in 1857. Nineteenth Century New York is atmospherically evoked, as is the precarious position of women within society. Unfortunately the characterisation doesn't quite work, Horan's Clifton doesn't have the charisma that the real Henry Clifton must have had as a great trial lawyer, and Emma comes across as just so unlikeable that I just didn't care about her fate. In mitigation, I did find the story of the escaped slave Samuel and his friendship with the boy, John, both compelling and moving.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great Book, one of my favorites
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago