Ambush Alley: The Most Extraordinary Battle of the Iraq War

Ambush Alley: The Most Extraordinary Battle of the Iraq War

by Tim Pritchard

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780891418818
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/26/2006
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 328
Sales rank: 832,344
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Tim Pritchard is a London-based journalist and filmmaker who has made several award-winning documentaries for the BBC, Channel 4, PBS, and the Discovery Channel. This is his first book.


From the Hardcover edition.

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Excerpted from "Ambush Alley"
by .
Copyright © 2006 Tim Pritchard.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Ambush Alley 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
bearpacker on LibraryThing 8 months ago
A chronicle of the many things that can go wrong in just 24 hours, during the early stages of Operation Iraqi Freedom with new combatants, on an approach into the city of Al Nasiriyah, which was supposed to be a 'friendly' city. Not a pretty day for most involved.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Byeeee
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book tookme sometime to read.as I was.a soldier over there on the second rotation.Memories of how fast it happenes when a fight starts and describes inbitter detail a hellous battle fought on the PUSH toBaghdad
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read for anyone interested in the Iraq conflict. Its hard to comprehend the difficulty our troops must deal with.
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Hardin_1B_Metz More than 1 year ago
This book is great. The intensity levels of the book are just out of the roof. The description about the war breaks down all the little details. How the tanks were shipped to Iraq, how they built the tanks from scratch, what they had to go through to be in the Marines, everything. The book itself is very gorish, and has some profanity. The main points are when the soldiers that are fighting for our freedom are being attacked by many different directions by what they call "HaJii's." They are rolling down the streets in a M111 Abraham's Tank when the HaJii's fire mortyrs at them. They easily take down the band of small-armed Iraqi troops. The book starts out about telling the reader about what he went through to be able to go to Iraq to fight in the war against terrorism. The soldiers are constantly on the move, without ever having any space to move around the tank. They're packed in tight, without having any leg room, or anywhere to sleep. The constant stench was un-bearable. They would constantly complain about the smell, and how they would always have to stop every few hours or so for a pit stop, to refuel the tanks, "stop 'nd go," etc. The war on terrorism is still going on, but the fighting has almost completely come to a stop. The book ends with Private First Class Casey Robinson digging "fighting holes," and would have to go back to Camp Lejeune to see the dead soldiers' families. He dreaded going back to the camp, to see all the crying mothers, the sorrowed, the mournful families that had risked their kin to fight for our freedom. The book is very good, and I would recommend it to any reader that can take some gore, and some profanity.