Art and Technology of Entertainment Computing and Communication

Art and Technology of Entertainment Computing and Communication

by Adrian David Cheok

Paperback(Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2010)

$159.00
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781447171379
Publisher: Springer London
Publication date: 08/09/2016
Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2010
Pages: 299
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.03(d)

About the Author

Adrian David Cheok is Director of the Mixed Reality Lab, National University of Singapore. He is Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Table of Contents

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Introduction to Embodied Media 2

1.2 Introduction to Mixed Reality 4

1.3 Feeling Communication 7

1.3.1 Emotional Communication and Entertainment Using Multi-sensory Media 9

1.4 Social and Physical Entertainment 12

1.5 Conclusion 16

References 17

2 Human Pacman: A Mobile Augmented Reality Entertainment System Based on Physical, Social, and Ubiquitous Computing 19

2.1 Introduction 19

2.2 Background 20

2.3 System Design and Game Play 23

2.3.1 Main Concepts: Team Collaboration, Ultimate Game Objectives and the Nature of Pac-world 24

2.3.2 Pacman and Ghost 27

2.3.3 Helper 29

2.3.4 Actual Game Play 31

2.4 User Study 36

2.4.1 Questions and Aims 37

2.4.2 Discussion 37

2.4.3 Analysis of Message Logs 45

2.4.4 Summary Findings 47

2.5 Mobile Service and Ubicomp Issues 48

2.5.1 Mobile Computing 49

2.5.2 Ubicomp 51

2.5.3 Addressing Sensor-Tracking Issues 53

2.6 Conclusion 54

References 55

3 Interactive Theater Experience with 3D Live Captured Actors and Spatial Sound 59

3.1 Introduction 59

3.2 Previous Work on Interactive Theater 60

3.3 New Media Art and Interactive Theater 61

3.4 Background 62

3.4.1 Embodied Mixed Reality Space 62

3.4.2 Live 3D Actors 63

3.4.3 Ambient Intelligence 68

3.5 Interactive Theater System 69

3.5.1 3D Live Capture Room 69

3.5.2 Interactive Theater Space 71

3.5.3 System Interaction Design 73

3.5.4 3D Sound in Interactive Theater Space 74

3.6 Conclusion 81

References 81

4 Metazoa Ludens: Mixed Reality Interaction and Play Between Humans and Animals 83

4.1 Introduction 83

4.2 Objectives 84

4.3 Related Works 85

4.3.1 Human-Animal Interaction System 85

4.3.2 Remote Interaction System 87

4.3.3 Mixed Reality System 87

4.4 Metazoa Ludens: Fundamental Design 88

4.4.1 Remote Interaction 88

4.4.2 Pet's Choice 88

4.4.3 Pet Interface 88

4.5 System Description 89

4.5.1 System Overview 90

4.5.2 Camera and Tracking Subsystem 90

4.5.3 Hardware Subsystem 93

4.5.4 Moldable Latex Surface 93

4.5.5 Game Subsystem 94

4.5.6 User Game Play Experience 96

4.6 Evaluation, Results and Discussion 98

4.6.1 Study 1: Health Benefits to the Hamsters 98

4.6.2 Study 2: Pets' Choice 100

4.6.3 Study 3: Users' Enjoyment Based on Flow 101

4.7 Framework for Human-Animal Interaction System 103

4.8 Veracity of Telepresence 108

4.9 Conclusion 108

References 109

5 Poultry Internet 111

5.1 Introduction 111

5.2 Motivation for Human-Pet Touch Interaction 114

5.2.1 Why Do We Keep Animals as Companions? 114

5.2.2 The Effect of Touching and Caressing on Poultry and Other Animals 115

5.3 Review of Related Works 115

5.3.1 Previous Tele-haptic Systems 115

5.3.2 Previous Human-Pet Interaction Systems 116

5.3.3 Why Not Just Interact with Virtual or Robotic Pet? 117

5.4 Poultry Internet as a Cybernetics System 119

5.5 Technical Details of the Multi-modal Interaction System 119

5.5.1 Overall System 119

5.5.2 Remote Physical Touch 120

5.5.3 Computer Vision Pet Tracking 125

5.6 Experiences and User Studies 127

5.7 Wider Applications 131

5.7.1 Multiplexing Existing Communication Channels 131

5.7.2 Intimacy Through Ubiquitous Computing 132

5.7.3 Spying/Rescuing Pet 133

5.8 Conclusion and Future Works 133

References 135

6 Age Invaders: Entertainment for Elderly and Young 137

6.1 Introduction 137

6.2 Related Work 139

6.3 Design Methodology 140

6.3.1 Problem Identification 140

6.3.2 Problem Exploration 141

6.3.3 Design Goals 142

6.4 Design Requirements 143

6.4.1 Resources and Time Constraints 143

6.4.2 User Needs 144

6.4.3 Context of Use 144

6.5 Design Idea Generation 144

6.6 Prototype Iterations 145

6.7 Current System Description 146

6.7.1 System Architecture 146

6.7.2 Game Play 148

6.8 User Studies Results 150

6.8.1 Intergenerational Player Study 150

6.8.2 Focus Group Session with Older Players 151

6.8.3 Physical Interface Design Issues 152

6.8.4 Physicality Issues of the Virtual and Physical Player Roles 154

6.9 Software Libraries and Toolkit 155

6.10 Product Development 158

6.11 Conclusion 159

References 159

7 Huggy Pajama: A Remote Interactive Touch and Hugging System 161

7.1 Introduction 161

7.2 Background 164

7.2.1 Why Touch Communication? 164

7.2.2 Previous Work 165

7.3 System Description 168

7.3.1 Mediated Touch Module 168

7.3.2 Thermal Controlled Fabric Display 173

7.3.3 Design of Experiments 175

7.4 Results and Discussion 180

7.4.1 Input Touch Sensing Module 180

7.4.2 Output Touch Actuation Module 181

7.4.3 Thermal Control System 185

7.4.4 Evaluation of System 187

7.5 Conclusion 191

References 192

8 Culture Computing: Interactive Technology to Explore Culture 195

8.1 Introduction 195

8.2 Prior Research 196

8.3 Features of Cultural Computing 197

8.4 Media Me 198

8.4.1 Introduction 198

8.4.2 Motivation 201

8.4.3 System Description 201

8.4.4 Video Indexing 204

8.5 BlogWall 206

8.5.1 Introduction 206

8.5.2 Motivation 206

8.5.3 System Description 207

8.5.4 An Example of Poetry Mixing 212

8.6 Confucius Computer 215

8.6.1 Introduction 215

8.6.2 Motivation 215

8.6.3 System Description 215

8.7 Conclusion 218

References 220

9 Kawaii/Cute Interactive Media 223

9.1 Introduction 223

9.2 The Cute Aesthetic 223

9.2.1 Kawaii: Cute Culture History and Development in Japan 223

9.2.2 History of Manga 225

9.2.3 Kawaii Culture Development in Modern Japan 227

9.2.4 Kawaii Globalization 228

9.3 Contemporary Perceptions of Kawaii/Cute 230

9.4 Cuteness in Interactive Systems 230

9.4.1 Child-Like Innocence and Play 231

9.4.2 Moments of Surprise 231

9.4.3 Relationship with Object's Personality 232

9.5 Studying Cuteness 232

9.5.1 Defining Cuteness 233

9.5.2 Color Selection 233

9.5.3 Texture 235

9.5.4 Motion 236

9.5.5 Sound 237

9.5.6 Size and Proportion 238

9.5.7 Shapes and Form 240

9.5.8 Smell and Taste 243

9.6 Related Works. Cute Interactive Systems 243

9.7 Cute Engineering 244

9.7.1 Cute Filter 244

9.7.2 Research-Oriented Design 246

9.8 Qoot Systems. Petimo and Virtual World for Social Networking 246

9.9 Sensing, Actuation and Feedback 249

9.9.1 Sensing 250

9.9.2 Actuation and Feedback 251

9.10 Conclusion 253

References 253

10 Designing for Entertaining Everyday Experiences Masa Inakage Takahiro Arakawa Kenji Iguchi Yuichiro Katsumoto Makoto Katsura Takeshi Osawa Satoru Tokuhisa Atsuro Ueki 255

10.1 Introduction 255

10.2 Everyday Media 256

10.2.1 Amagatana 257

10.2.2 Tabby 258

10.3 Embodied Media 259

10.3.1 Morel 260

10.3.2 MYSQ 261

10.3.3 livePic 262

10.4 Sensuous Media 264

10.4.1 Nozoki-Hana 264

10.4.2 Mamagoto 266

10.5 Collective Media 267

10.5.1 Mopie 267

10.6 Conclusion 268

References 269

11 Tabletop Games: Platforms, Experimental Games and Design Recommendations Michael Haller Clifton Forlines Christina Koeffel Jakob Leitner Chia Shen 271

11.1 Introduction 271

11.2 Tabletop Hardware & the Types of Interaction They Support 272

11.2.1 SmartBoard 273

11.2.2 DiamondTouch 273

11.2.3 SmartSkin 274

11.2.4 Microsoft Surface 275

11.2.5 Frustrated Total Internal Reflection (FTIR) 276

11.2.6 Entertaible 276

11.2.7 Stylus 277

11.3 Experimental Tabletop Games 278

11.3.1 Educational 278

11.3.2 Therapeutic 280

11.3.3 Entertainment 283

11.4 Case Studies 284

11.4.1 Jam-O-World: CircleMaze 284

11.4.2 CircleMaze 285

11.4.3 User Testing and Observations 286

11.4.4 Porting to a Direct-Touch Tabletop 286

11.4.5 Comino and NeonRacer 286

11.4.6 User Testing and Observations 287

11.4.7 Interaction Design for a Walk-up-and-Use Tabletop Game 288

11.5 Heuristics for Tabletop Games 289

11.5.1 Evaluation Process 290

11.6 Ten Heuristics for Tabletop Games 293

11.6.1 Cognitive Workload 293

11.6.2 Challenge 293

11.6.3 Reach 293

11.6.4 Examinability 294

11.6.5 Adaptability 294

11.6.6 Interaction 294

11.6.7 Level of Automation 294

11.6.8 Collaboration and Communication 295

11.6.9 Feedback 295

11.6.10 Comfort of the Physical Setup 296

11.7 Conclusions 296

References 296

Index 299

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