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Baby Owl's Rescue
     

Baby Owl's Rescue

5.0 1
by Jennifer Keats Curtis, Laura Jacques (Illustrator)
 

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What if you found a baby owl in your backyard? Would you know what to do? Where would you go to find help? Join young Maddie and Max as they learn a valuable lesson from a little lost owl in Baby Owl's Rescue by Jennifer Keats Curtis. The brother and sister pair just wanted to play baseball one day. They never expected to come face-to-face with a wild animal! Lush

Overview

What if you found a baby owl in your backyard? Would you know what to do? Where would you go to find help? Join young Maddie and Max as they learn a valuable lesson from a little lost owl in Baby Owl's Rescue by Jennifer Keats Curtis. The brother and sister pair just wanted to play baseball one day. They never expected to come face-to-face with a wild animal! Lush illustrations by Laura Jacques accompany this story and demonstrate the proper treatment of wildlife. This story reminds all of us that we live in a world surrounded by wild animals, and those wild animals deserve our caution and our respect!

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3–4—A carefully constructed scenario traces the rescue of a baby owl blown out of the nest in a storm. Fortuitously for the owlet, the tree is in the yard of a wildlife rehabilitator, so all is made right with the aid of some sticks, a laundry basket, and a team of obliging firefighters handily equipped with a cherry picker. Young Maddie and Max watch eagerly as their mom coordinates rescue efforts and provides pointers on procedures. The book concludes with pages of facts on great horned owls, a matching game, and instructions on handling injured or "owned" birds. Pleasantly instructive, with colorful realistic illustrations, this title might be a nice introduction to Susan Goodman's slightly more demanding Animal Rescue: The Best Job There Is (S & S, 2000) or Juliana Hatkoff's moving Winter's Tail (Scholastic, 2009).—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607186106
Publisher:
Arbordale Publishing
Publication date:
08/10/2009
Series:
Baby Owl's Rescue
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.00(h) x (d)
Lexile:
AD900L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Jennifer Keats Curtis (Turtles in My Sandbox and Baby Owl's Rescue, Fall 2009) wants to help bring children close to the animals in their own backyards. By diligently researching her topic and interviewing real experts, including children working to help preserve and protect local wildlife, the journalist has developed a knack for teaching young children about important ecological issues and what they can do to help. Jennifer's first book, Oshus and Shelly Save the Bay, won the Frederick Douglass Award (Maryland Council of Teachers of English Language Arts). She also wrote Osprey Adventure, based on the work of Peter McGowan, a biologist with US Fish & Wildlife. Most days, Jennifer can be found among students and teachers, talking about literacy or conservation. She also regularly presents writing workshops to elementary school sudents. When she's not in schools, Jennifer contributes to several magazines and serves as editor-at-large for Maryland Life Magazine. Avid fans of anything having to do with the outdoors, Jennifer and her family spend their summers in and on the Chesapeake Bay. She resides in Maryland, with her family and a wide variety of pets, including a turtle.

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Baby Owl's Rescue 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Autumn2 More than 1 year ago
K picked this book up from his school library. The pictures, the story all went together perfectly well. Two young kids find a baby owl in their backyard, and with the help from their mother the owl is put back into the tree. We learn a bit of a lesson that you should not touch an animal out in the wild. And that they are not pets. We learn the proper way to handle an injured or misplaced animal but only adults should do it.  You also learn about Great Horned Owls. At the end of the story, you get fun facts, an Owl's Life Cycle and what you should do if you find an injured bird which I think is great for all to know.  Overall a great story that both K and I enjoyed reading before bedtime.