Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy for the Future

Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy for the Future

Paperback(Unabridged)

$5.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Wednesday, May 30 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Overview

Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy for the Future by Friedrich Nietzsche

The great 19th-century philosopher refines his previously expressed ideal of the superman in one of his most important works, a fascinating examination of human values and morality. Publisher's Note.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486298689
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 07/07/1997
Series: Dover Thrift Editions Series
Edition description: Unabridged
Pages: 176
Sales rank: 537,020
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 8.19(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range: 14 Years

About the Author

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was born in Prussia in 1844. After the death of his father, a Lutheran minister, Nietzsche was raised from the age of five by his mother in a household of women. In 1869 he was appointed Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, where he taught until 1879 when poor health forced him to retire. He never recovered from a nervous breakdown in 1889 and died eleven years later. Known for saying that “god is dead,” Nietzsche propounded his metaphysical construct of the superiority of the disciplined individual (superman) living in the present over traditional values derived from Christianity and its emphasis on heavenly rewards. His ideas were appropriated by the Fascists, who turned his theories into social realities that he had never intended.

Walter Kaufmann was a philosopher and poet, as well as a renowned translator of Friedrich Nietzsche. His books include Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, AntichristFrom Shakespeare to Existentialism, and Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sartre. He was a Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University, where he taught after receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1947 until his death in 1980. He held visiting appointments at many American and foreign universities, including Columbia, Cornell, Heidelberg, Jerusalem, and the Australian National University; and his books have been translated into Dutch, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish.

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION 7(20)
TRANSLATOR'S NOTE 27(2)
BEYOND GOOD AND EVIL
29(196)
Preface 31(2)
Part One: On the Prejudices of Philosophers
33(22)
Part Two: The Free Spirit
55(19)
Part Three: The Religious Nature
74(16)
Part Four: Maxims and Interludes
90(18)
Part Five: On the Natural History of Morals
108(21)
Part Six: We Scholars
129(18)
Part Seven: Our Virtues
147(23)
Part Eight: Peoples and Fatherlands
170(22)
Part Nine: What is Noble?
192(30)
From High Mountains: Epode
222(3)
COMMENTARY 225

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Beyond Good and Evil (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this book Nietzsche is amazing for having discovered all the flaws that even philosophers like himself make. To get an idea of his true meaning one will have to forget about all prejudices and even all truths for that matter! Once again, Nietzsche includes a fine collection of aphorisms to dispute all others.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The liberal philosophy and the truth in a greatful book. I strongly recommend this book to everyone interested in his life and in his future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't waste your time with this version. It's a scanned copy probably using an antique scanner! Every word with "r n" is automatically converted to "m". Therefore, "born" is converted to "bom" and virtually every "l" is converted to the symbol for British Pound Sterling. Ya, get what you paid for folks....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A lot of misprints, but not so bad that it renders the text unintelligible irritatingly printed but useful if you want to catch up on your nietzsche
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TJ Scott More than 1 year ago
Out of the translations K've read, definitely the best. Not dumbed down at all, but still uses language one can understand! Some passages take a couple rereadings, but that's.nietszche for ya.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Larryam More than 1 year ago
Don't waste the 99 cents. When I downloaded this it turned out it was a circa 1917 translation, and so pretty much worthless.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The title, Beyond Good & Evil, can make the author seem a bit (perhaps a lot!) crude, but only if the title is to be interpreted (without reading the whole book) at face value. This is precisely what Nietzsche was against: reaching a conclusion that is `certain¿ based on the `name,¿ `idea,¿ or `concept¿ given to things and persons from a bias of superficiality. From this `labeling¿ the `simple man¿ becomes prejudiced, and therefore, locked into his `tradition¿ of thought and language, and as a consequence, cannot rise to a height `beyond¿ this `good & evil¿ man has created for himself. It is Nietzsche¿s task to drive his readers `beyond¿ this `good & evil¿ (where it is possible to create higher values), to shift perspectives, to a height where one cannot look up nor look down. At this height there exists no god, no mask, no prejudice. There is only the ¿great-souled man.¿ There is a lesson to be learned, but to learn it one only has to read Nietzsche in his spirit to find it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can someone give me like a summary. Thanx
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I dunno