Bloodsucking Fiends

Bloodsucking Fiends

by Christopher Moore

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416558491
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 03/18/2008
Series: Bloodsucking Fiends Series , #1
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 123,498
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Christopher Moore is the bestselling author of You Suck, A Dirty Job, The Stupidest Angel, Fluke, Lamb, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, Island of the Sequined Love Nun, Bloodsucking Fiends, and Practical Demonkeeping. Visit the
official Christopher Moore website at www.chrismoore.com.

Hometown:

Hawaii and San Francisco, California

Date of Birth:

August 5, 1958

Place of Birth:

Toledo, Ohio

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1
Death

Sundown painted purple across the great Pyramid while the Emperor enjoyed a steaming whiz against a dumpster in the alley be low. A low fog worked its way up from the bay, snaked around columns and over concrete lions to wash against the towers where the West's money was moved. The financial district: an hour ago it ran with rivers of men in gray wool and women in heels; now the streets, built on sunken ships and gold-rush garbage, were deserted quiet except for a foghorn that lowed across the bay like a lonesome cow.

The Emperor shook his scepter to clear the last few drops, shivered, then zipped up and turned to the royal hounds who waited at his heels. The foghorn sounds especially sad this evening, don't you think?"

The smaller of the dogs, a Boston terrier, dipped his head and licked his chops.

Bummer, you are so simple. My city is decaying before your eyes. The air is thick with poison, the children are shooting each other in the street, and now this plague, this horrible plague is killing my people by the thousands, and all you think about is food."

The Emperor nodded to the larger dog, a golden retriever.

"Lazarus knows the weight of our responsibility. Does one have to die to find dignity? I wonder."

Lazarus lowered his ears and growled.

Have I offended you, my friend?"

Bummer began growling and backing away from the dumpster. The Emperor turned to see the lid of the dumpster being slowly lifted by a pale hand. Bummer barked a warning. A figure stood up in the dumpster, his hair dark and wild and speckled with trash, skin white as bone. He vaulted out of the dumpster and hissed at the little dog, showing long white fangs. Bummer yelpedand cowered behind the Emperor's leg.

"That will be quite enough of that," the Emperor commanded, puffing himself up and tucking his thumbs under the lapels of his worn overcoat.

The vampire brushed a bit of rotted lettuce from his black shirt and grinned. I'II let you live," he said, his voice like a file on ancient rusted metal. That's your punishment."

The Emperor's eyes went wide with terror, but he held his ground. The vampire laughed, then turned and walked away.

The Emperor felt a chill run up his neck as the vampire disappeared into the fog. He hung his head and thought, Not this. My city is dying of poison and plague and now this--this creature-- stalks the streets. The responsibility is suffocating. Emperor or not, I am only a man. I am weak as water: an entire empire to save and right now I would sell my soul for a bucket of the Colonel's crispy-fried chicken. Ah, but I must be strong for the troops. It could be worse, I suppose. I could be the Emperor of Oakland.

Chins up, boys," the Emperor said to his hounds. "If we are to battle this monster, we will need our strength. There is a bakery in North Beach that will presently be dumping the day-old. Let's be off." He shuffled away thinking, Nero fiddled while his empire went to ashes; I shall eat leathery pastries.

Copyright ) 1995 by Christopher Moore

Table of Contents

Reading Group Guide

Bloodsucking Fiends, a Love Story

Christopher Moore

Description

Part love story, part vampire tale, and part murder mystery, Bloodsucking Fiends tells the story of an unlikely vampire, Jody, who, just discovering her various powers decides that she needs someone to carry on her various day-to-day, can’t-be-out-during-the-daylight tasks, and enlists C. Thomas Flood, more affectionately known as Tommy to help her out. Little do they know that the spark of love will hit them; so in addition to all of the joys and pratfalls of a new relationship, Jody must contend with the pratfalls of being the newly undead, and as if that weren’t enough, there’s another vampire on the loose who happens to be killing people left and right and arranging things so that Jody and Tommy look like the culprits. It is obviously not easy being a modern day vampire.

Questions for Discussion:

  1. Everyone has been exposed to Vampire Lore, either through books, movies, or television. How does Jody’s transformation into a vampire differ from how you always thought a vampire was created? In what ways was it similar?
  2. Jody and Tommy’s relationship moves at a rather alarming pace, and within a week of meeting each other, they are in love. Is love at first sight possible? Or in their case, at first bite? Why do they connect so instantly?
  3. The book is filled with religious connotations, whether intentional or not – from the mention of “the pyramid” (The TransAmerica Tower), to the use of crosses to ward off vampires, to the Animals being referred to as “Crusaders”. How intentional do you think this was on the part of the author? What do these add to the story?
  4. The book touches upon the idea of euthanasia – the practice of ending life of a terminally ill person in a painless or minimally painful way in order to limit suffering, in that Elijah Ben Sapir, the vampire who creates Jody only kills those who are about to die or whose lives are limited in some way. What are your feelings about “mercy killings”? Do vampires have an ethical standard?
  5. Jody ends up killing Simon in the front of his truck when he threatens her when she refuses to turn him into a vampire. Jody blames the killing on Elijah, however, and never confesses it to Tommy by the end of the book. Why not admit to it when Elijah has been restrained?
  6. Why are Jody and Tommy “set-up” as the culprits in the recent crimes? What would it mean if they were caught? Why did these crimes need to be pinned on anyone? Couldn’t the criminals cover the crimes in another way?
  7. By the end of the novel, both detectives – Cavuto and Rivera begin to believe in the supernatural and that vampires could exist. To what extent do you believe in the supernatural, either vampires, ghosts, or just even in those who may or may not have psychic ability?

  1. Tommy uses Anne Rice’s The Vampire Lestat as his “Owner’s Manual” for learning about Jody and her new powers, which of course is fictional. Discuss the author’s use of fiction within fiction in order to tell a story. Have any members of your group read The Vampire Lestat? How do the two books compare?

  1. Though Jody finds herself immortal, she also maintains many of her normal human characteristics and failings, including vanity, fear, anger, and disgust. Discuss how even though she has become immortal, and can protect herself from many of the regular dangers of everyday life, she is still unable to disassociate herself with normal human emotion.
  2. At the end of the book, the reader is left with the impression that Jody is about to turn Tommy into a vampire. If she does change him into a vampire, how do you imagine their story continues? How would it continue if she does not?

Tips to Enhance Your Bookclub


  1. Would you be willing to trade your normal life – being able to go out in the daylight, not being immortal – in order to become a vampire? You’d be able to live forever, have super strength, speed, etc. among many other different gifts. Would it be worth it? Why? Why not?

  1. To read more about vampires take a look at the following titles: The Society of S, By Susan Hubbard, Vamped by David Sosnowki, The Book of Renfeld, A Gospel of Dracula by Tim Lucas and Happy Hour at Casa Dracula, by Marta Costa

  1. Once Jody becomes a vampire, she finds that she has many new and different abilities, including super strength, heightened senses, and super speed. Which do you think is her most needed new super ability?

  1. Learn more about vampires: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampires

Introduction

Questions for Discussion

1. Everyone has been exposed to Vampire lore, either through books, movies, or television. How does Jody's transformation into a vampire differ from how you always thought someone became a vampire? In what ways is it similar?

2. Jody and Tommy's relationship moves at a rather alarming pace, and within a week of meeting each other, they are in love. Is love at first sight possible? Or in their case, at first bite? Why do they connect so instantly?

3. The book is filled with religious connotations, whether intentional or not — from the mention of "the pyramid" (The TransAmerica Tower), to the use of crosses to ward off vampires, to the Animals being referred to as "Crusaders." How intentional do you think this was on the part of the author? What do these add to the story?

4. The book touches upon the idea of euthanasia — the practice of ending the life of a terminally ill person in a painless or minimally painful way in order to limit suffering — in that Elijah Ben Sapir, the vampire who creates Jody, only kills those who are about to die or whose lives are limited in some way. What are your feelings about "mercy killings"? Do vampires have an ethical standard?

5. When Simon threatens Jody after she refuses to turn him into a vampire, she ends up killing him in the front of his truck. Jody then blames the killing on Elijah, however, and never confesses it to Tommy. Why not admit to it when Elijah has been restrained?

6. Why are Jody and Tommy "set up" as the culprits in the recent crimes? What would it mean if they were caught? Why do these crimes need to be pinned on anyone? Couldn't the criminals cover up thecrimes in another way?

7. By the end of the novel, both detectives — Cavuto and Rivera — begin to believe in the supernatural and that vampires could exist. To what extent do you believe in the supernatural, either vampires, ghosts, or even just that some people may or may not have psychic ability?

8. Tommy uses Anne Rice's The Vampire Lestat, which of course is fiction, as his "Owner's Manual" for learning about Jody and her new powers. Discuss the author's use of fiction within fiction in order to tell a story. Have any members of your group read The Vampire Lestat? How do the two books compare?

9. Once Jody becomes a vampire, she finds that she has many new and different abilities, including superstrength, heightened senses, and superspeed. Which do you think is her most needed new superability?

10. Though Jody finds herself immortal, she also retains many of her normal human characteristics and failings, including vanity, fear, anger, and disgust. Discuss how even though she has become immortal, and can protect herself from many of the regular dangers of everyday life, she is still unable to disassociate herself from normal human emotion.

11. At the end of the book, the reader is left with the impression that Jody is about to turn Tommy into a vampire. If she does change him into a vampire, how do you imagine their story continues? How would it continue if she does not?

Enhancing Your Bookclub

1. Would you be willing to give up your normal life — being able to go out in the daylight, not being immortal — in order to become a vampire? You'd be able to live forever, have superstrength and -speed, among many other different gifts. Would it be worth it? Why? Why not?

2. To read more about vampires, take a look at the following titles: The Society of S by Susan Hubbard, Vamped by David Sosnowski, The Book of Renfield: A Gospel of Dracula by Tim Lucas, and Happy Hour at Casa Dracula by Marta Costa.

3. Learn more about vampires: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampires.

Christopher Moore is the bestselling author of You Suck, A Dirty Job, The Stupidest Angel, Fluke, Lamb, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, Island of the Sequined Love Nun, Bloodsucking Fiends, and Practical Demonkeeping. Visit the

official Christopher Moore website at www.chrismoore.com.

Customer Reviews

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Bloodsucking Fiends 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 347 reviews.
Living_Life_n_AZ More than 1 year ago
If you wish to escape life for a while and laugh this is the book for you. Be careful where you read it however, as you will laugh out loud and be looked at strangely. You Suck is the followup and is just as funny.
SonicQuack on LibraryThing 23 days ago
As one would expect from Moore's work, Bloodsucking Fiends delivers a funny, fast-paced story, in which, despite the absurdity of it all, you are engrossed in the tale from start to end. There is a sprinkling of top-notch scenes, although not as numerous as latter works, so although you won't be splitting your sides, there's enough to keep you smiling. However, there is lack of a decent plot in Fiends. It's hardly original ground, although Moore's slant adds something new to the packed vampire genre. A pleasant tale, packed with modern cultural humour and taboo, Fiends is a recommended read, but does not represent Moore at his peak.
pratchettfan on LibraryThing 23 days ago
A hilarious story about a girl who is turned into a vampire and left alone to cope with her condition. Fortunately , she soon meets Tommy, who agrees to help her with chores to be done during daylight hours.Even though there are several laugh out loud sequences, it doesn't quite compare with 'A Dirty Job', which was funnier and more absurd, but it's interesting to learn more about some of the characters from that novel such as The Emperor of San Francisco and his men.
defrog on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Having liked Practical Demonkeeping, I gave Moore another go with this one ¿ vampires in San Francisco ¿ and liked it even more. It¿s a pretty funny and clever take on the vampire genre, with a woman being turned into one against her will and a naive boyfriend who thinks it¿s pretty cool but is otherwise a complete idiot. Also a clear indication that sometimes the best genre novels are written by people who don¿t normally write for that genre.
iftyzaidi on LibraryThing 25 days ago
This is the second Christopher Moore book I've read, and while it was a decent enough read, I wasn't really taken by it. The set up has the potential to be amusing: a young woman is turned into a vampire by a mysterious, ancient vampire, who then leaves her to fend for herself. She in turn desperately tries to learn the ropes of being a vampire without being found out (or combusting in sunlight) and ends up shacking up with a lovelorn writer/grocery clerk who has just moved to the big city. Antics ensue and antes are upped when they realise the ancient vampire is playing some kind of deadly cat and mouse game with them and leaving dead bodies lying around their apartment and workplace, thereby attracting the attention of the police.Sounds funny? It is mildly so. But too much Mars/Venus comedy (a female's unstoppable need to go shopping to cheer themselves up, etc.) and various other cliches. The plot also doesn't quite acquire the depth to it to really hook the reader. Thankfully its a slim book and the story doesn't outstay its welcome.
Daniel.Estes on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Listening to the dialogue and interplay between the characters is what sets the tone for me in Christopher Moore's Bloodsucking Fiends. Vampire stories really aren't my thing, even lighthearted ones such as this, but watching Jody figure out what to do next while Tommy tries to keep up with her made this a good read for me.
TheBoltChick on LibraryThing 25 days ago
One of the few vampire novels that will make you laugh out loud! Jody is walking home one night when she is attacked. She wakes up to find she is a vampire. Now how exactly does a vampire get along in modern day San Francisco? She seeks a minion to do chores that need doing during the day, and mayhem ensues. Add "the emperor", night shift at the Safeway complete with turkey bowling, and an old vampire with an ax to grind, and you have a fun romp!
topps on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Quirky, fun, hysterical at times... which annoyed my wife with my frequent chuckling.
Scoshie on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Yet another laugh out loud book from one of the best authers around today. There is no way to describe Moore's books other than hilarious.
brodeurbunny30 on LibraryThing 25 days ago
I have never read a Christopher Moore book until this one, and I know it came with a lot of good word of mouth about it's comedic timing and off-the-wall storyline, but as someone who normally enjoys Comedy in all media formats, I was sorely disappointed. I found a lot of the jokes trying too hard to make me laugh. The 'what if' aspects of the story kinda got tiresome when it got going, and the wrap up was very anti-climatic. Overall, a meh.
Squatch on LibraryThing 25 days ago
I have found a new favorite author with Christopher Moore. His enchanting comical takes about decidedly non-comical situations really give the reader a sense of this could happen to them. While I've been a horror and fantasy reader for a while now, this book was a refreshing change in tone. Can't say I've read many vampire novels in which I've laughed out loud on more than one occasion. Or felt the same levels of compassion for fictitous characters for that matter. I've known of Christopher Moore's work since Lamb was published, but until recently had never read any of his books. That all changes now. I was initially attracted to the sequel to Bloodsucking Fiends (You Suck) and purchased both at the same time I was so intrigued. And let me say, I was not disappointed! Very engaging book that left me thirsty (or is that bloodthirsty?) for more. And I've decided any time snapping turtles are introduced as a plot device, I should check it out... The main characters are Jody, a red-hot redhead and recently turned vampire and her servant/love interest Tommy, an aspiring writer just striking out in San Francisco. Jody takes Tommy under her wing, much to Tommy's obvious and exhuberant delight. Along the way, they run into the vampire who turned Jody, who is set on having her for his own. A series of misadventures ensues, and Moore's cast of supporting characters (which are every bit as interesting as his main characters) get drawn into the comedy and action. The story ended and I found myself wanting more Moore. Oh and speaking of the sequel, it reads like a conversation with an old friend, the characters are that familiar. Check both books out. I've already loaned or bought copies for several of my friends.
revslick on LibraryThing 25 days ago
This is the first Moore novel that disappointed me. It seemed disjointed and lacking compared to similar series that are funnier and bring better snark like the Stackhouse or Dead & Unwed series. Like the previous mentioned vampire series, the main character is a self-deprecating, female lead learning the ropes of her powers while solving some mystery. Granted there were a few funny lines but overall if you want funny supernatural novels turn to the novels mentioned above.
trinityM82 on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Freaking hilarious. A redhead is changed into a vampire by some elusive man who took a fancy to her. She then, in turn, gets a boy to do her bidding whom she eventually turns into a vampire as well, though her sire wants to kill him for taking his place at her bedside. But really funny - the boy works at a 7/11 - the night shift and has some really interesting characters who in turn have interesting encounters.
manda19 on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Very funny and one of my favourite vampire books of all time.
lindenstein on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Christopher Moore is a really fun and funny writer, and I love reading his books. I don't know if this was my favorite Moore book, but I really enjoyed the characters and the overall storyline. The whole vampire theme seems to be inundating books these days (even though this isn't a new release), but I thought that this offered a different, sarcastic point of view that you don't get from a lot of writers. Flood is a sympathetic (at times pathetic) character, and the book has an overall satisfying ending. I can't wait to read the sequel.
jhughes84 on LibraryThing 25 days ago
I read this book coming off the "Twilight" phenomena, and it was recommended by a friend, so I was expecting a corny vampire love story. Boy was I wrong, Bloodsucking Fiends had me laughing until I was in tears. The sarcasm and wit is something I've come to expect from Christopher Moore books (having also read "Dirty Job" and "Lamb" in the past), and he does not disappoint in this novel.
doxtator on LibraryThing 25 days ago
One night, Jody is attacked and wakes up a vampires. Once she realizes what she is, she realizes she needs a human to help her with daylight hour things, which is where her new boyfriend wannabe-writter C. Thomas Flood comes in. Meanwhile, the vampire that made her is playing a frightening game of leaving dead bodies on Jody's doorstep, and the police are getting very interested. Generally, this is a fun book. It has some cute moments, some funny moments, some odd ball moments. It has enough references to keep a well-versed person eyeballing things, and enough wacky tidbits here and there to mark it more in the humor arena than any other category. It has some interesting characters (the two cops were the best), and some really not so interesting characters. I was generally disappointed in Jody, the main character. She was generally flat, with tropes and cliches for personsonality rather than there actually being anything truly interesting about her. The vampire that made her to begin the story keeps going on about how she's so different, but this is not followed up upon in any sort of interesting way. In fact, I'd say as a female reader, I was a bit insulted. Jody was the only major female character in the whole book, she's squeezing herself into a size 3 when normally she's a size 5 (it's a high end dress, perhaps hence the less common numbers), she's got gorgeous red hair, flawless skin, etcetera, and so on. As a fantasy/sci-fi action adventure story, it's a quick read, and quite entertaining. There's nothing ground breaking in the vampire genre, or the romance genre, but it should hold your attention if you were on the beach. I probably wouldn't go back to find the sequel(s), though, even if I knew I had a beach vacation coming up soon.The narrative style was often sparse and then too descriptive, depending on what sort of thing was being focused on. Conversations were generally truncated, and somewhat more like real life ones, enough so that they could sometimes be hard to follow. The "zingy" nature of the narrative worked okay since it was a humorous novel, but beginning the book is a bit of a bog until the characters and setting resolve themselves enough to be more solid in the readers' mind.
Jenners26 on LibraryThing 25 days ago
2 Words that describe the book: Vampire comedy3 Settings where it took place or characters you met:* Setting: Modern-day San Francisco* Jody¿A fledgling vampire who had her new lifestyle thrust upon her with no warning or choice, Jody is trying her best to make sense of her new undead lifestyle. But getting used to a life lived solely at night can make things a little tricky, so Jody needs a minion to do her bidding, which is where...* C. Thomas Flood comes in. A wannabe writer from Incontinence, Indiana, Tommy is new in town and having a hard time getting adjusted to life in the Big City ... until he meets the new love of his life, a certain undead redhead. Although Jody can be a little tricky and high-maintenance with her vampire lifestyle, Tommy is in love (he thinks). As Jody and Tommy settle into together, things take a turn for the worse when the vampire who created Jody starts causing trouble for them.4 Things you liked and/or disliked about it:* I like Christopher Moore. This is the first book of his vampire trilogy (though I accidentally read You Suck first because I didn't realize it was a series). But Moore's vampires aren't brooding, sparkly, or particularly scary. Jody is just like you and me ... except with superhuman strength, a thirst for blood and heightened senses. Moore has fun with the whole vampire thing, which brings me to another thing I liked about the book.* I liked how Moore has Tommy test various vampire legends and stories on Jody to see what is true or not. Once Tommy finds out Jody's little secret, he cannot resist getting every book on vampires out of the library and checking to see what is true and untrue about vampires. These little experiments include having Tommy sneaking around touching Jody with crucifixes, trying to drown her in a bathtub, having her try to climb walls like Dracula, and rubbing her with garlic while she sleeps. And I liked Moore's shout-out to the Vampire Lestat by Anne Rice.* I liked how the book is just stuffed with Moore's hilarious throwaway lines. You'll be reading along and then Moore will write something so silly or goofy or unexpected that you just have to laugh out loud. Consider this thought from Jody: She thought, My closet is starting to look like an ostrich hatchery. I've either got to start throwing out L'eggs eggs or get a tan on my legs and quit wearing nylons.This cracked me up because I so remember having all those eggs! Do they even make those any more? It has been AGES since I wore pantyhose.* I disliked the overly serious Reading Group Guide at the back of my book. This is a book that is written to be funny and read for enjoyment. In my opinion, it doesn't cry out for book club discussions or deep thought. Yet there is a Reading Group Guide at the back with discussion questions like this: Everyone has been exposed to vampire lore, either through books, movies or television. How does Jody's transformation into a vampire differ from how you always thought someone became a vampire? In what ways is it similar? The books touches upon the idea of euthanasia--the practice of ending the life of a terminally ill person in a painless or minimally painful way in order to limit suffering--in that Elijah Ben Sapir, the vampire who creates Jody, only kills those who are about to die or whose lives are limited in some way. What are your feelings about "mercy killings"? Do vampires have an ethical standard?Though I would totally want to join a book club that chose to read Bloodsucking Fiends, I can't imagine having a big old serious discussion on vampire lore and euthanasia as a result! But maybe that is just me.5 Stars or less for your rating?I'm giving the book 4 stars. I actually liked You Suck a bit better, but you can't go wrong with Moore. He's a fun, irreverent, creative writer whose sense of humor comes through on every page. Even if you don't like vampire books, you can have fun with this one. (You won't be scared, I promise. The only scary thing is
crazybatcow on LibraryThing 25 days ago
A lot of reviews said this was a very funny book. It is light-hearted, and some parts, perhaps, are humorous, but there wasn't a single laugh-out-loud moment for me. Not one. I'm not even sure it made me smile at any point. This doesn't mean it was bad, not by any means... it was very engaging and there were no points where the story lagged or where I was tempted to skim. There's just enough description to bring stuff to life, but not so much that you get tired of the descriptions.A decent read. Fast and entertaining (though not outright funny) and interesting enough that I'd read the next in the series.
irunsjh on LibraryThing 25 days ago
A fun fast read. I am looking forward to the life of Flood and Jody in You Suck. I thought that the vampire mythology was very good. Different and unique, with enough similiarities to other vampire mythologies to seem somewhat believable.
miyurose on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Now this is the Christopher Moore I initially raved about. This is light and irreverent and a lot of fun. The main characters are likeable and the supporting cast strong. The 'Animals', Tommy¿s fellow night-shifters at the Safeway, seemed like precursors to the 'Nerd Herd' on Chuck. Moore explores some of the little talked about side effects of becoming a vampire, like having to quit your job and figuring out what to do when your car gets towed and you can¿t retrieve it in the daytime. Then again, it¿s hard to beat the perks of perfect skin and superhuman strength. This is the first book of a series, and we¿ll definitely be listening to You Suck sometime this year.
donkeytiara on LibraryThing 25 days ago
an easy traveling read, by an irreverent but at times clever author. Better than chick lit, but sort of at the same level of mindpower to read ~ likeable characters develop too quickly, but there's a sequel, so we'll see where it goes from here. Thank goodness for christoper moore....cuz i can't stand chick lit and just need an easy read every so often!
Meggo on LibraryThing 25 days ago
A highly enjoyable romp, this is the story of Jody, a brand new vampire, and Tommy, her "daytime boyfriend", as it were. The prequel to "You Suck", this book is by far the more enjoyable of the two. Definitely worth reading if you like Christopher Moore at all. Highly enjoyable.
asummerwasting08 on LibraryThing 25 days ago
Very, very cute, and very, very snarky. A lovely plot and a great sense of narrative wit make this story funny and pleasurable to read. The characterization is a bit dry at times, and Moore tends to pigeonhole his characters--with the possible exception of a gruff gay policeman--but it just adds to the slightly cynical air of the novel, which makes it all the more fun. Great for a short summer read.
madamejeanie on LibraryThing 25 days ago
This definitely isn't his best effort. Still, it was an amusing story with some of Moore's infamous character and scene descriptions, but it was a little bit short on plot. I did enjoy it, but I'm glad I had read his later novels first because he definitely hadn't hit his stride when he wrote this one. It's worth a read, though, and a fairly good way to pass an afternoon.