Cumberland Island: Strong Women, Wild Horses

Cumberland Island: Strong Women, Wild Horses

by Charles Seabrook

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Overview

In September 1996, Cumberland Island blasted onto the national news scene when it was revealed that John Kennedy, Jr., and Carolyn Bessette were married on the island in the First African Baptist Church—a simple one-room frame structure with eight handmade pews. When the flotilla of writers and photographers arrived on the island a few days later only to find themselves itching, sweating, and swatting at pestiferous gnats and bloodthirsty mosquitoes, they wondered why such a worldly and sophisticated couple had chosen such a tick-infested spot. InCumberland Island, Charles Seabrook uses his talent as an award-winning environmental writer to describe the island’s natural bounty and to tell its long and intriguing history. You’ll meet Catherine “Caty” Greene Miller, the widow of Revolutionary War hero Nathanael Greene and the woman who inspired Eli Whitney to invent the cotton gin. There’s Miss Lucy Ferguson, considered by many to be the toughest and orneriest of all the strong women who inhabited the island, reigning over it during the 1960s and ’70s. The present-day generation is represented by Janet “GoGo” Ferguson, Miss Lucy’s granddaughter, who made the arrangements for the Kennedy and Bessette wedding and crafted their wedding rings as well. Today, the island serves as a lightning rod for controversy. Although the island is currently under the purview of the National Park Service, some descendants still reside on the island. The dispute over the sale of land by cash-strapped landowners to commercial developers creates as much heated debate as the discussion of how the Park Service should balance the management of a wilderness area with the privileges accorded the residents. Included in these two debates are the questions of whether the island’s signature wild-horse herd should be dispersed because of the environmental damage it wreaks and whether the historic mansions that still pepper the island be allowed to crumble to ruin for the sake of wilderness preservation.

Charles Seabrook has been a long-time environmental writer for theAtlanta Journal-Constitution. His popular weekly column called "Wild Georgia" was the victim of cutbacks. However, in 2008, the paper reinstituted the column due to reader demand. In 1981, Seabrook was one of the first reporters in the world to write about a mysterious and burgeoning disease that would soon be known as AIDS. In addition, he has written extensively on global warming, air and water pollution, and songbird decline. He has won awards from the National Wildlife Federation, the Southern Environmental Law Center, and various press organizations. His newspaper series about Georgia’s mining industry won the Investigative Reporters and Editors “Best Story of the Year” award in 1994. In 2001, the state of Georgia gave him the R. L. "Rock" Howard Award, its highest conservation award. He lives in Decatur, Georgia.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780895873057
Publisher: Blair
Publication date: 01/01/2002
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 373
Sales rank: 731,850
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

About the Author

Charles Seabrook has been a long-time environmental writer for theAtlanta Journal-Constitution. His popular weekly column called "Wild Georgia" was the victim of cutbacks. However, in 2008, the paper reinstituted the column due to reader demand. In 1981, Seabrook was one of the first reporters in the world to write about a mysterious and burgeoning disease that would soon be known as AIDS. In addition, he has written extensively on global warming, air and water pollution, and songbird decline. He has won awards from the National Wildlife Federation, the Southern Environmental Law Center, and various press organizations. His newspaper series about Georgia’s mining industry won the Investigative Reporters and Editors “Best Story of the Year” award in 1994. In 2001, the state of Georgia gave him the R. L. "Rock" Howard Award, its highest conservation award. He lives in Decatur, Georgia.

Table of Contents

Prologue3
Chapter 1Two Strong Women14
Chapter 2Tacatacuru to Cumberland34
Chapter 3Caty47
Chapter 4Slaves and Lovers70
Chapter 5Steel and Magnolias88
Chapter 6The Golden Age120
Chapter 7Mansions from Mama135
Chapter 8Money Woes156
Chapter 9The North End175
Chapter 10Carol203
Chapter 11Saved by the Government215
Chapter 12Land Grabs248
Chapter 13Miss Lucy272
Chapter 14The Wilderness314
Chapter 15Horses and Hogs330
Chapter 16The Wedding339
Epilogue357
Notes on Sources365
Acknowledgments367
Index368

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Cumberland Island: Strong Women, Wild Horses 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As I read this book I really felt like I was there and living with these people. Very informative on the history and the people of Cumberland Island and all they have gone through to save this beautiful island from development. Wonderful read, very well written.
zenitsky on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very interesting and readable history of Cumberland Island from the early settlement period until the early 21st Century. Seabrook does a good job describing the key female personalities that strove to protect the island until the National Park Service took over in the 1970's. He also lays out the many of the difficult land disputes and conservation issues that continue to this day.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago