Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction

Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction

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Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
nbmars More than 1 year ago
Eric Foner begins this excellent short elaboration of his earlier book (Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877) with the observation that, in spite of the biblical proportions of the transformation of four million slaves from bondage to citizenship, "this critical moment in our nation's history has failed to establish itself in the national memory, at least with any accuracy or full depth of understanding." Because of this omission, he charges, problems with race remain that have never been fully addressed. Foner charges that the legacy of the Civil War developed into "a fascination with the valor of combat," a war of "noble tragedy pitting brother against brother." Black Americans are relegated to a minor role. This characterization dominates the history, memorialization and discussion of the Civil War and post-Civil War period. Largely obliterated is the service of some 200,000 African Americans in the Union army and navy; the vast exodus of southern slaves to northern lines as the Union came through; the excitement over freedom by African Americans; their desire to work, own land, engage in civic activities, vote, and above all, to get educated; and the violent suppression of those aspirations. "Jim Crow" laws taking rights away from blacks were enacted in one state of the South after another. The Klan was given free reign to exercise police powers over blacks without fear of reprisal. Schools and other public services for blacks were defunded. History textbooks used in southern schools were designed to teach white superiority and black backwardness, so that children imbibed these ideas from the earliest age. These practices helped structure the commemorative patterns that came to inform the dominant narratives of our history, and which thus kept alive the negative stereotypes of Reconstruction. Foner bemoans the fact that "At the dawn of the twenty-first century, what is remarkable is both how much America's racial situation has changed, and how much it remains the same." He implores us to reexamine Reconstruction and its effects, to help challenge the dominant narratives that successfully keep traditionally oppressed groups from receiving equal opportunity. He asks us to cease effacing the stories of black achievement during Reconstruction, and to recognize the ideological components of memory. Only then can we make good on the promises that were made to blacks so long ago that they too could be part of the American dream.