ISBN-10:
0393313964
ISBN-13:
9780393313963
Pub. Date:
02/17/1996
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Girl with Curious Hair

Girl with Curious Hair

by David Foster Wallace

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393313963
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 02/17/1996
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 407,234
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) is the author of Infinite Jest, Girl with Curious Hair, Everything and More, The Broom of the System, and other fiction and nonfiction. Among his honors, he received a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award, and a Whiting Writers' Award.

Date of Birth:

February 21, 1962

Date of Death:

September 12, 2008

Place of Birth:

Ithaca, NY

Place of Death:

Claremont, CA

Education:

B.A. in English & Philosophy, Amherst College, 1985;MFA, University of Arizona, 1987

What People are Saying About This

T Coraghessan Boyle

David Foster Wallace turns the short story upside down and inside out, making the adjectives "inventive," "unique," and "original," seem blase.

Customer Reviews

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Girl with Curious Hair 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
lssian on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Totally original, fun, and well written. I can't wait to read it again.
chadmarsh on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Favorite Stories - "Little Expressionless Animals," "Girl with Curious Hair," "Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way"
gazzy on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Technically an excellent writer, but in this collection of short stories he reveals little heart.
Crowyhead on LibraryThing 3 months ago
I prefer Wallace's short stories to his longer fiction, and this is probably my favorite collection of his work. Check out "Lyndon," "Little Expressionless Animals," and "Everything Is Green."
cpauthor More than 1 year ago
When most people feel they're up to the task of reading David Foster Wallace, they tend to gravitate towards Infinite Jest, attracted in part by the huge mass. This, an earlier book by him, is a much better intro to the man's work, and a great book in its own right. Apart from Donald Barthelme, Wallace has written here the most peculiar, audacious, and funny book of contemporary times. When I wrote my book, I thought back lovingly of Girl With Curious Hair. The author is one of my idols and is sorely missed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ladshomes More than 1 year ago
Scholars count David Foster Wallace (poss best known for Infinite Jest) among POMO icons, but most of the stories are more enjoyable than some POMO. I didn't like the title story, but many are poignant or insightful with cultural references that layer but aren't necessary to the read. There are even some "laugh out loud" moments throughout. His characters are people you know or know of, his voices seem spot-on, his settings are alternately bizarre or ordinary. One of my fav quotes: "one kind of response to Otherness. Say the whole point of love is to try to get your fingers through the holes in the lover's mask. To get some kind of hold on the mask, and who cares how you do it" (32). Try him out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is supposed to be the work of a genius? When it wasn't pretentious, it was boring. When it wasn't boring it was neurotic. The last story was particularly awful. Worst of all, nothing left a lasting impression. Definitely not DFW's best work. I'd even say his estate shouldn't have let this be published.