Good Enough to Eat

Good Enough to Eat

by Stacey Ballis

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425229637
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/07/2010
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 830,781
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Stacey Ballis is the author of ten foodie novels: Inappropriate MenSleeping OverRoom for ImprovementThe Spinster SistersGood Enough to EatOff the MenuOut to LunchRecipe for DisasterWedding Girl, and How to Change a Life. She is a contributing author to three nonfiction anthologies: Girls Who Like Boys Who Like BoysEverything I Needed to Know About Being a Girl I Learned from Judy Blume, and Living Jewishly.

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Good Enough to Eat 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
Tanzenite More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading it, but there was not too much excitement, and not really any big laughs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I, too, read this book based on Jen Lancaster'sa t recommendatiin and was very disappointed! The writing is is okay, but the characters were so sickeningly nice to each other. Plus all of the long, advice filled passages drove me nuts! The story was very predictable and wrapped up too neatly for me. I read the whole thing because I kept thinking it would get better....
Myckyee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Melanie Hoffman, the heroine of Good Enough to Eat by Stacey Ballis, tackles what could be some very depressing challenges in her life: divorce, food issues, entrepreneurship (she owns a gourmet take-out café) and relationships. She manages (and sometimes mismanages) it all with pluck and support from family and friends.Each chapter in this novel begins with Melanie's reminisces about how certain foods relate to events in her life, be they large or small. Quite a variety of food is covered - mashed potatoes, chocolate cupcakes, peanut butter; I liked how the author was able to place them just so - they all have a place in the story. Also, all the food mentioned as the story chapters are included twice in recipes at the back of the book. The first recipe for cupcakes is a health conscious variation of the second which are called Decadent Dark Chocolate Cupcakes, and from reading through the ingredients they are, well, more decadent than the lighter version. I haven't tried any of the recipes yet but I definitely plan to.The author describes some of Melanie's preparations in getting the café's food ready for customers and the interaction between employees makes it sound like fun - I'd like to work there! I imagine though, that no matter how much fun it is, and how much help Melanie has from her employees, running a café is a lot of work. I didn't (mostly) get that impression from reading this book. I mention this because I used to own an ice cream shoppe and though we only sold ice cream (in all its forms) it was time-consuming and intensive.
LiterateHousewife on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Good Enough to Eat is the story of Melanie Hoffman, a 30-something Chicago professional who, after being obese for most of her life, has reached her goal weight. Along the way to finding her healthiest weight, she decides to leave her career as a lawyer to become a chef. Shortly after she opened her restaurant, her husband left her. It seems, after he took up with one of her obese friend, he preferred much more flesh on his women. All along, she believed that their relationship had been about what was important, not the superficial issues of the physical. When she discovered that it was her body that attracted her ex-husband, not her whole self, she questioned who she really was, regardless of what her body looked like.As someone who is obese, this book appealed to me right away. The main character has lived life in my skin and has accomplished what I dream of accomplishing permanently ¿ well with the exception of losing my husband along the way. There have been three times in my life when I¿ve stuck with a diet long enough to be psyched about my body. Each time, it¿s not lasted for me. I approached this book with the same hopes that I approach all weight loss success stories ¿ that it will spark the fuse inside me that will lead me down the path to a healthier me once again. What I discovered was a novel so honest about everything related to weight, weigh loss, body image, and compulsive eating that it made me cry. Melanie found what have always feared (and knew deep down inside) to be true ¿ you are never free from the cravings and compulsions that lead to obesity. It doesn¿t get easier. If anything, it¿s probably harder. I wanted to scream. I could only read this book a little at a time before the ¿It¿s f*cking not fair!¿ demons (who never get anyone anywhere) would start raging in my head.It¿s when Melanie recollections of her life in a fat body played out that brought on the tears. Shortly after booking a flight home for what would be for my grandfather¿s memorial service, I got to the chapter where she was taking a trip to NYC to speak to a Jewish woman¿s conference about her shop. She pointed out the relative ease with which she flew there. No worries about the seat belts not fitting and having to ask for an extension. No looks of relief on your fellow travelers¿ faces as you passed their row and they knew that you were not going to sit next to them. No forced politeness through exasperation from the person(s) who would be sitting next to you. No muscle cramps and pains from the exertion of keeping your flesh as far as possible from your aisle mates. Reading this at that time was like a reading a mini horror story. Those are the very things that run through my head every time I even have to think about booking a flight. They are the things that lead to sleepless nights coming up to the trip. While often it is soothing to know that there are others in this world who share your experiences, this chapter was like being slapped in the face with my own reality. It was at that point that I set Good Enough to Eat down and couldn¿t pick it back up again until this past weekend. It just cut too close.Stacey Ballis is clearly an author who understands what it is like to be fat ¿ with an obese body or without. The sections where Melanie calls Carey, her nutritionist and life counselor, were spot on about rebuilding relationships with food when addiction and compulsion are involved. If you want to know what it¿s like to binge and it¿s emotional repercussions, Ballis has brought it to life in all honesty. This book was extremely difficult for me to read. This is stated as a compliment. I¿ve never before read a novel about an obese woman that has had this effect on me. Good Enough to Eat did not encourage me to immediately jump on the weight loss band wagon once again. As an emotional eater, the feelings this book created along with my grandfather¿s passing and the shortening days has had just the opp
scoutlee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Mini-Review:Melanie lost 145 pounds in two years. After successfully completing her weight loss goal, her husband tells her he wants a divorce. He's fallen in love with someone else. A woman twice the size that Melanie used to be.Instead of allowing herself to wallow in self-pity, Melanie decides to quit her corporate job and follow her dreams: opening a gourmet shop. When the shop is up and running, Melanie soon faces a dire financial situation that forces her to take in a roommate.Good Enough to Eat is a novel about starting over, having the courage to pursue one's dreams and the strength to love again. Sometimes we find ourselves on an unfamiliar path, but if we are patient it will lead us to where we were meant to be. Highly recommended.
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This book was a great summer read. The characters were not intense and the story line was easygoing. I was a tad bit disappointed at the end of the story. The recipes at the end were a good touch too. I liked this book.
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