High Five!: The Magic of Working Together

High Five!: The Magic of Working Together

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High Five!: The Magic of Working Together 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great book and value. Read this book in one sitting and truly enjoyed it. Another Winner by Spencer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Team building is one of those important things that too many managers overlook. Some even play one talented employee off the other, which can be counterproductive in the long run. This book makes important points, like: The team must have (and buy into) a shared purpose. It also recognizes the value of indivudual skills that people bring, and how they may not always fit into a general job title.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be totally delightful as a model for how to be a better adult coach of a children's team. For many years, I have recommended that all those who want to learn how to be better leaders and managers begin by taking on these coaching chores. This is the first book I have ever seen that successfully captures the important principles of coaching these teams. This book deserves many more than five stars for that accomplishment! The benefits of that are many. First, the players will get a role model of how to cooperate in order to be more effective. Second, the coaches will learn how to be better leaders, and will be able to use that skill in other areas of their lives. Third, the parents will learn what to encourage their children to do in order to get the most from the team experience, and this will bring parents and their children closer together. The book's fable boils down to four key principles: (1) The team needs a shared purpose, values and goals. (2) Skills need to be developed individually that enhance the team's effectiveness. (3) Enhance team effectiveness by integrating the individual skills properly. (4) Repeatedly reward and recognize individuals for taking actions that enhance team effectiveness. A weakness of the fable is that it doesn't give enough attention to how to achieve the first principle for the typical team. My suggestion is that you poll your players before the first practice to find out what their purposes, goals, and values are. Then hold a meeting to discuss what you learned, and build a consensus from there. My experience has been that 99 percent of the players want to have fun, want to improve, and win at least a few games. Be sure to find out what they think is 'fun' because it's often different from what the coaches would assume. Fun usually turns out to be loosely supervised scrimmaging time. When that was the case, I ran a brief such scrimmage at the end of every practice until the last player was picked up by her or his parents. The other place where I would like to make a suggestion is about recognition. I was a coach for 14 years, and I found that giving individual awards to every player for every game worked very well. Everybody does something right at least once in a game. I would make a note of it, describe the reasons for each award, and hand out a little token at the end of each game for each such award. At the end of the season, the player could turn in these tokens for other forms of recognition. I also shouted out the person's name and award when they won one. That way, each child could be a winner every time we played, even if the team lost. And we did not lose very often. The players loved to win those awards for passing, defense, and offense. Scoring accounted for well less than 10 percent of the awards in my experience. This book has one of the best exercises I have ever seen for convincing people to work on team skills. You divide the players into the 'best' math students and the least good ones. Then you teach the least good ones how to cooperate to win an addition game. You let the 'best' math students struggle on their own. The least good ones will win almost e
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is another of those well-intentioned books, which can work superbly in an ideal workplace where management has earned the respect of their employees and 'High Five teamwork' is not just an empty phrase uttered at the occasional leadership class. My own experiences and those of many of my collegues is unfortunately not so rosy and having read the biting American satire 'MANAGEMENT BY VICE' by C.B. Don, I finally realized why this is so! I urge Human Resources leaders and managers to read through this book in addition to 'High Five' to really see which negative factors MUST be eliminated first from the work environment before the sound advice in 'High Five' can be implemented. Otherwise, you will experience the same pitfalls we did at our company and 'High Five' will become nothing more than: 'Teamwork spirit how you're disguised...you're a Farce and Impure, not 200 Proof; Diluted, you're naught, but a Management Spoof!' (Quote from 'Management by Vice').
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a fine example of this kind of lesson by parable--and there are a lot of lessons here. I enjoyed the book, but it's not really my thing. My preference is for more real world books like the wonderful Shakelton's Way or the amazing, Filling the Glass: The Skeptic's Guide to Positive Thinking in Business. Both prove that a great business book can be entertaining as well as instructive without leaving the real world.