Illusions of Paradox: A Feminist Epistemology Naturalized
Illusions of Paradox: A Feminist Epistemology Naturalized

Illusions of Paradox: A Feminist Epistemology Naturalized

by Richmond Campbell

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Overview

Illusions of Paradox: A Feminist Epistemology Naturalized by Richmond Campbell

Modern epistemology has run into several paradoxes in its efforts to explain how knowledge acquisition can be both socially based (and thus apparently context-relative) and still able to determine objective facts about the world. In this important book, Richmond Campbell attempts to dispel some of these paradoxes, to show how they are ultimately just "illusions of paradox," by developing ideas central to two of the most promising currents in epistemology: feminist epistemology and naturalized epistemology. Campbell's aim is to construct a coherent theory of knowing that is feminist and "naturalized." "Illusions of Paradox" will be valuable for students and scholars of epistemology and women's studies.

Author Biography: Richmond Campbell is professor of philosophy at Dalhousie University. He is the author of "Self-Love and Self-Respect" and coeditor of "Paradoxes of Rationality and Cooperation: Prisoner's Dilemma and Newcomb's Problem".

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780847689187
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date: 05/28/1998
Series: Studies in Epistemology and Cognitive Theory Series
Pages: 304
Product dimensions: 6.16(w) x 9.26(h) x 0.81(d)

About the Author

Richmond Campbell is professor of philosophy at Dalhousie University. He is the author of Self-Love and Self-Respect and coeditor of Paradoxes of Rationality and Cooperation: Prisoner's Dilemma and Newcomb's Problem.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsxi
1.Introduction1
Promise or Paradox?1
The Paradoxes4
Three Commitments12
Notes13
Part IFeminism and Empirical Knowledge
2.Understanding Feminist Empiricism19
Internal Feminist Empiricism19
Is This a Coherent Empiricism?23
Can It Be Objective?27
Does It Have Sufficient Scope?30
Why Empiricism?32
Notes35
3.The Realism Question43
Systemic Bias and Explanatory Power43
Truth Versus Models47
Diversity, Maps, and Individuality49
More Arguments from Norms53
Quine's Argument55
The Bias Paradox56
Notes59
4.Knowledge as Social and Reflexive63
A Case for Social Epistemology63
Longino on Dialogue and Objectivity67
Emotional Knowledge70
Reflexivity and Empiricism74
Standpoint Theory Compared78
Notes79
Part IIFeminism and Naturalized Epistemology
5.Normative Naturalized Epistemology85
Quine on Induction85
Normativity Forsaken?88
The Circularity Problem92
Native Inferential Tendencies95
Truth Versus Fitness97
Notes100
6.Self-Knowledge and Feminist Naturalism103
The Genetic Fallacy Fallacy103
Hardwig and Baier on Trust106
MacKinnon on Self-Knowledge and Sexual Pleasure109
Dillon on Basal Self-Respect113
Sherwin on Autonomy116
Feminism and Scientism120
Notes122
Part IIIFeminism, Meaning, and Value
7.Fact-Value Holism127
Can Ends Be Objective?127
The Fact-Value Dichotomy129
Fact and Value as Interdependent131
Models and Norms in Okin's Theory133
Can Norms Explain the World?136
What Are Epistemic Norms?138
Notes141
8.Meaning-Value Holism145
Analyticity and the A Priori145
Kitcher on A Priori Knowledge149
Adding Fact-Meaning Holism152
Is Feminist Metaethics Possible?154
Feminist Moral Realism?155
Notes163
Part IVFeminism and Moral Knowledge
9.Feminist Contractarianism167
Feminist Motivations in Conflict167
A Hybrid Theory of Moral Judgment169
Realism and Contractarianism175
Reconciling Justice with Care178
The Need for an Archimedean Point181
Embodied Knowledge182
Transformational Experiences184
The Baseline Problem185
Morality without Foundations186
Notes188
10.Feminist Contractarianism Naturalized191
Analogy with Induction191
Biology in "Man's" Image?194
Extending the Analogy196
Coping with Circularity199
Foundationalism or Coherentism?201
The Communitarian Objection205
Taking Consent Seriously210
Notes213
11.Conclusion217
The Paradoxes Are Illusions217
Is It Really Feminism? Or Philosophy?225
Note229
Bibliography231
Index241
About the Author247

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