Lincoln's Dreams

Lincoln's Dreams

by Connie Willis

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

$7.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

"A novel of classical proportions and virtues...humane and moving."–The Washington Post Book World

"A love story on more than one level, and Ms. Willis does justice to them all. It was only toward the end of the book that I realized how much tension had been generated, how engrossed I was in the characters, how much I cared about their fates."–The New York Times Book Review

For Jeff Johnston, a young historical reseacher for a Civil War novelist, reality is redefined on a bitter cold night near the close of a lingering winter. He meets Annie, an intense and lovely young woman suffering from vivid, intense nightmares. Haunted by the dreamer and her unrelenting dreams, Jeff leads Annie on an emotional odyssey through the heartland of the Civil War in search of a cure. On long-silenced battlefields their relationship blossoms–two obsessed lovers linked by unbreakable chains of history, torn by a duty that could destroy them both. Suspenseful, moving, and highly compelling, Lincoln’s Dreams is a novel of rare imaginative power.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780553270259
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 06/28/1992
Series: Spectra Series
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.55(d)

About the Author

Connie Willis has won six Nebula and Six Hugo Awards (more than any other science fiction writer) and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for her first novel, Lincoln's Dreams.  Her novel Doomsday Book won both the Nebula and Hugo Awards, and her first short-story collection, Fire Watch, was a New York Times Notable Book.  Her other works include Bellwether, Impossible Things, Remake, and Uncharted Territory.  Ms.  Willis lives in Greeley, Colorado, with her family.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Lincoln's Dreams"
by .
Copyright © 1992 Connie Willis.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Lincoln's Dreams 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Gwendydd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I found this to be an enjoyable and quick read. It is very typical Connie Willis - the characters are engaging, and the novel explores some big questions about what it means to be human. More specifically, it asks what dreams mean, and whether dreams connect us with other people, living or dead. As always, Willis's research is impeccable, not only about dreams and what the scientific community thinks about them, but also about the Civil War and the lives of Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee. Willis also has an amazing knack for writing subplots from the point of view of the main character, yet the main character is totally unaware of the subplots. The reader knows a lot more about what is going on than the main characters do, and this adds interesting dimensions to the story.I don't really have anything bad to say about the book, but it's still only a 4-star book - it was very good, but didn't quite have that extra dazzle that makes a book worth 5 stars.
debnance on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read two Connie Willis books before I read Lincoln's Dreams. They were ToSay Nothing of the Dog and The Doomsday Book. Both dealt with time travel.To Say Nothing of the Dog was a fresh book for me and I recommended it toothers. The Doomsday Book, an older book of Willis, was very similar and Idid not like it as much..I did look forward to reading Lincoln's Dreams. Very disappointing. I didnot want to finish it. I kept wondering why this book was published. Itseemed poorly edited. Lots of problems with the storyline.I find that people who love science fiction seem to overlook problems withthe plot or character development. They seem so taken with the genre thatthey are not always especially discriminating.I hope I'm not overgeneralizing.
SeriousGrace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Connie Willis typically writes science fiction or fantasy and while Lincoln's Dreams doesn't take place in the year 2197 or on the planet Baktakazini, it is equally mind bending and thought provoking. Jeff Johnston is a historical researcher working for a Civil War novelist, Thomas Broun. Broun is obsessed with Abraham Lincoln's dreams of foreshadowing before his death. Broun goes to great length to analyze them with Jeff's help. Through his research, Jeff meets Annie, a beautiful Sleep Institute patient who has troubling dreams of her own. Annie has been having dreams not about Robert E. Lee, but AS Robert E. Lee. It's as if her dreams really are those of Lee's. Jeff takes it upon himself to not only satisfy the growing obsession Broun has with supporting facts about Lincoln's dreams but, he also tries to cure Annie of her own Civil War nightmares while falling in love in the process.
pickoftheliterate on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Back to a Civil War-related book as opposed to this year¿s nautical / travel / Italy themes¿ Connie Willis writes science fiction for those who are leery of the genre, somewhat in the way that J.K. Rowling writes fantasy that works for those who otherwise won¿t touch it. By this I mean that Willis doesn¿t write wildly fantastic S-F featuring Planet XJ-7 or alien species. Basically she writes books that feature realistic characters but with one key element that is not possible. She¿s often fascinated with different eras: I highly recommend her Dooms Day Book, which features a woman traveling back in time to better understand the era of the Black Plague in England. That¿s an amazing book.Lincoln¿s Dreams is an earlier, shorter, and less ambitious work, but an enjoyable if not profound one. Jeff Johnston, a researcher who works for a Civil War novel writer, meets Annie, the patient/lover (!) of an old college friend. She has a ¿sleep disorder¿ in which she seems to be dreaming the dreams of Robert E. Lee during the Civil War! We follow the action as Jeff tries to help Annie while protecting her from those who wish to ¿cure¿ her against her will. This is great for Civil War buffs and a suspenseful, even somewhat romantic read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A stunning book by a SF giant. I could not put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As an amateur historian I know exactly where Willie Lincoln is buried, a faux mystery that is an important plot point, and why 'Lincoln Dreams' when she is dreaming about Lee?
songcatchers More than 1 year ago
I was very unimpressed with Lincoln's Dreams. It was slow, boring and I really didn't care about the characters. It's hard to describe this book because I'm still not sure what it was really about. A young woman, Annie, starts having the dreams of Robert E. Lee (even though the title of the book is Lincoln's Dreams). They are dreams of war and carnage. Nightmares really. Jeff, a research assistant for a civil war novelist, tries to help Annie but they really just travel around to old battlefields and sit in coffee shops and generally don't do anything at all. Pretty boring. The only reason I'm giving it two stars instead of one is because of the historical references. I enjoyed all the quips about the Civil War and the people who fought it....that's really what kept me reading. There are much more interesting novels out there that deal with the Civil War though. I don't recommend this one.