Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist

by Charles Dickens

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9788899163693
Publisher: Fermento
Publication date: 04/24/2015
Series: Emozioni senza tempo , #65
Sold by: StreetLib SRL
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was one of England's greatest writers. Best known for his classic serialized novels, such as Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, and Great Expectations, Dickens wrote about the London he lived in, the conditions of the poor, and the growing tensions between the classes. He achieved critical and popular international success in his lifetime and was honored with burial in Westminster Abbey.

Date of Birth:

February 7, 1812

Date of Death:

June 18, 1870

Place of Birth:

Portsmouth, England

Place of Death:

Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Education:

Home-schooling; attended Dame School at Chatham briefly and Wellington

Read an Excerpt

Chapter I
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Oliver Twist"
by .
Copyright © 2003 Charles Dickens.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Introdução, por Ricardo Lísias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OLIVER TWIST 25 1 Do lugar em que Oliver Twist nasceu e das circunstâncias que ocorreram nessa ocasião . . . . . . . 27 2 Como Oliver Twist cresceu e foi educado . . . . . . . 31 3 De como Oliver Twist escapou de um emprego que não era sinecura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 4 Oliver acha um emprego e faz a sua entrada no mundo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 5 Oliver trava novos conhecimentos; assiste a um enterro e fica com uma má ideia do ofício . . . . . . 58 6 Luta e vitória . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 7 Oliver prossegue em sua rebelião . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 8 Oliver vai a Londres e encontra em caminho um rapaz misterioso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 9 Novos pormenores acerca do amável ancião e seus discípulos, rapazes das mais altas esperanças 92 10 Oliver estreita as suas relações com os novos amigos e adquire experiência à sua custa. A pequenez deste capítulo não impede que seja um dos mais importantes da história do nosso herói. . . . . . . . . .100 11 Trata-se de um Sr. Fang, comissário de polícia, e dá-se uma amostra de sua maneira de julgar. . . .106 12 Oliver é tratado como nunca; novas informações a respeito do amável ancião e seus discípulos . . .115 13 Apresentação de alguns personagens novos que não são estranhos a certos particulares interessantes desta história . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 14 Profecia de um certo Sr. Grimwig a respeito de Oliver na ocasião em que ele foi dar um recado .134 15 Vê-se o amor que o jocoso judeu e Miss Nancy tinham a Oliver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145 16 O que foi feito de Oliver depois de ser levado por Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153 17 A má estrela de Oliver traz a Londres um grande personagem expressamente para lhe marear a reputação . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164 18 Como Oliver passava o tempo na sociedade de seus respeitáveis amigos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 19 Adoção de um plano de campanha . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 20 Oliver é entregue ao Sr. Guilherme Sikes . . . . . . . 192 21 A expedição. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202 22 Arrombar para roubar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209 23 De como um bedel pode ter bom sentimentos. Curiosa conversa do Sr. Bumble e uma senhora. 218 24 Pormenores dolorosos, mas curtos, cujo conhecimento é necessário para a inteligência desta história . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227 25 Encontramos outra vez Fagin e a sua troça. . . . . .234 26 Entra em cena um personagem misterioso. Importantes pormenores estreitamente ligados com esta história. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242 27 Para reparar uma descortesia de outro capítulo em que se abandonou sem mais cerimônia uma senhora. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255 28 Prosseguem as aventuras de Oliver . . . . . . . . . . . . .264 29 Em que se apresentam os habitantes da casa que recolhera Oliver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276

Reading Group Guide

1. Oliver Twist has been called a social satire, a melodrama, a cheaply sentimental novel, and a masterpiece. How would you categorize the novel and why?

2. Some critics have observed that Oliver Twist is merely a passive pawn in the deadly match between good and evil. It is further stipulated that the “good” characters, such as Mr. Brownlow and the Maylies, pale in comparison to the villains Fagan and Bill Sikes. Do you agree? Which characters are the most vivid and why?

3. According to the novelist George Gissing, “Oliver Twist had a twofold moral purpose: to exhibit the evil working of the Poor Law Act, and to give a faithful picture of the life of thieves in London.” How effective is Dickens in capturing these two worlds and what is the relationship between them? How does the author use social satire to advocate social reform?

4. In The Author’s Preface to the Third Edition Dickens staunchly defends his decision to depict low-life characters in a realistic manner. Drawing on the author’s arguments, what can you glean about Victorian sensibilities at the time Oliver Twist was published?

5. In 1863, a reader chided Dickens for his anti-Semitic portrayal of Fagin. Dickens responded, “If there be any general feeling on the part of the intelligent Jewish people, that I have done them what you describe as ‘a great wrong,’ they are a far less sensible people than I have always supposed them to be . . . Fagin, in Oliver Twist, is a Jew, because it unfortunately was true of the time to which that story refers, that that class of criminal almost invariably was a Jew.” Should novelists be held accountable for invoking negative stereotypes? Can you think of additional examples of stereotypes in classic literature? Discuss.



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Oliver Twist 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read the fine print. This book is in Italian. The quoted excerpt however is in English.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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