Owlflight (Owl Mage Trilogy Series #1)

Owlflight (Owl Mage Trilogy Series #1)

by Mercedes Lackey, Larry Dixon

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780886778040
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 10/28/1998
Series: Owl Mage Trilogy Series , #1
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 312,473
Product dimensions: 4.21(w) x 6.73(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mercedes Lackey is a full-time writer and has published numerous novels and works of short fiction, including the best-selling Heralds Of Valdemar series. She is also a professional lyricist and a licensed wild bird rehabilitator. She lives in Oklahoma with her husband, artist Larry Dixon, and their flock of parrots.

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Owlflight (Owl Mage Trilogy Series #1) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 67 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read this trilogy of the Valedmar series at least a dozen times and I never tire of the colorful and multi-faceted characters born of the minds of Mercedes Lackey and Larry Dixon. A treat for any reader who enjoys medieval fantasy fiction.
Lisa_RR_H More than 1 year ago
I'm generally a fan of Lackey's Valdemar books. This one starts in a way very common to her, as we follow a young man, Darian, who is orphaned and alienated from all around him. One thing that makes this one different from the usual Valdemar books though, is this particular young man isn't destined to become a Herald. Instead we get to learn more about the mysterious Tayledras featured in other books. I don't know that I'd start here if I were new to Lackey or her Valdemar books--you'd do better, I think, picking up "Arrows of the Queen," the first published in the series. But this story, not having characters in common with the other books is independent enough you wouldn't need to read the other books, and though I think others among those books are better, this is still an engaging and entertaining read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book got me hooked on Mercedes Lackey's books. It was about a boy named Darian, an orphan raised by his village. Set in a fictional place called Valdemar, Darian is confronted with life without his parents, learning to deal with the villagers he detests, and barbarians that attack his village. He meets the mysterious Hawkbrothers, and tries to prove to everybody he is not the worthless screw-up they think him to be. Lackey did a very good job of seeing the story from many people's points of view, and their reactions to different situations. I enjoyed that her characters were like real people, flaws and all, and weren't perfect. I would recommend this book to any fan of fantasy, as well as people who want to see what the genre is about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Owl Flight is the second book in Mercedes Lackey's Owl trilogy. These books take place after the Mage Storms have been stopped. It tells how darian works in two worlds while trying not to deny either one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book greatly. The deep characters, accompanied by the rich surroundings that they live in create a vast world. Along with the captivating action is fun humor that will cause you to laugh out loud. I took a chance when I bought this book and I was immediately sold after the first chapter. Now I have the dilemma of finding money to buy the other books that Mercedes and Larry have written. I immediately went out and bought OWLSIGHT after finishing this book. I can't wait till OWLKNIGHT comes in paperback, [what can I say, I'm cheap!} This is truly a great book.
jjmcgaffey on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Good story. After the grand, world-saving sweep of Storms, we get a trilogy about some ordinary people dealing with the world post-Storms - mages dealing with the change in magic, everybody dealing with the strangeness left behind by the Storms, and everybody dealing with the changes in their lives from the war with Ancar - those who didn't come back, and three changes in what can be done because of that. It's set in a tiny village on the extreme west of Valdemar, which had no healer until a mage injured in the war came to help them; also, between the damage done by the physical storms and the new threats in the Forest, their economic base has gotten a lot weaker. The hero is a boy whose parents hunted the Forest, until they didn't come back; now he's, reluctantly, apprenticed to the mage. That's the setting. Then an attack by an army of northern barbarians, the involvement of a band of Tayledras who were nearby, Darian's (the boy) blossoming, and a new arrangement between Valdemar and the Tayledras, for this far-western area. The book stops there; the story could have, but doesn't. This is my third or fourth reread of the trilogy; this part of the story is necessary foundation, but it's not as good as the next two books. So merely good, not great.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing 22 days ago
I'm generally a fan of Lackey's Valdemar books. This one starts in a way very common to her, as we follow a young man, Darian, who is orphaned and alienated from all around him.One thing that makes this one different from the usual Valdemar books though, is this particular young man isn't destined to become a Herald. Instead we get to learn more about the mysterious Tayledras featured in other books.I wouldn't start here if you are new to Lackey or her Valdemar books--you'd do better, I think, picking up Arrows of the Queen, the first published in the series. But this story, not having characters in common with the other books, is independent enough you wouldn't need to read the other books, and though I think others among the Valdemar books are better, this is still an engaging and entertaining read along sword and sorcery coming of age lines, even if not particularly memorable or striking within that genre.
Ceysa on LibraryThing 22 days ago
I love this book because it was not just a coming of age book, but because both Dixon and Lackey bring to life the village he lived in, reference some of the primary players in the kingdom of Valdemar in the second circling of the cataclysm, but bring in new players.It brings to life the Tayledras and the establishment of a Vale, but more than that brings to life things only hinted at in the final book of the Mage series written about Vanyel. The Northerners come south searching for more power to steal from the stupid humans who must tend the soil and are not men enough to hunt for a livlihood of their own. It explains more about the dangers of the change circles and the devestation after the 2nd Cataclysm that must be cleaned up,And most of all it brings to life the pettiness of people who have problems feeling left out and abandoned by their Kingdom, dealing with someone who does not fit the rest of the villager's ideals and how they unwittingly hurt and nearly destroy someone with good intentions.A mage sacrifices himself, a boy with the help of the Tayledras and their traveling companions, the hertasi and dyheli and a griffon manage to save them and set them free. A fun ready, lots of action and totally appealing characters, even the misguided villagers who can't understand anything different from themselves.
AScheu on LibraryThing 22 days ago
One of the first Valdemar books I read and one of my favorites. The character Darian seems more realistic than some of the main characters in other Valdemar novels as he is less than perfect which allows me to more readily identify with him. It is enjoyable to see how he develops as a character. I probably read this and it's sequel once a year.
SunnySD on LibraryThing 22 days ago
When his trapper parents fail to return from a foray into the Pelagirs young Darian is apprenticed to the village mage. Resent it though he might, Darian has no choice but to obey the bumbling and often ridiculed Justyn whose tales of times more heroic seem to Darian to be pathetic and probably untruthful. But when barbarians invade the village and Justyn makes the ultimate sacrifice, Darian sees that all may not have been quite as he thought after all.Timeline-wise this follows the Mage Storms series and offers a view from the very edges of Valdemar. No epics here, but a closer look at some of the clean-up, as well as the roads superstition, intolerance, and good intentions can lead us down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mercedes Lackey is one of the very best writers I have ever read. The word pictures that she draws live in your mind and the stories live in your heart.
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Sighs sad that they still didnt trust her.
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