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The Polar Bear Son: An Inuit Tale
     

The Polar Bear Son: An Inuit Tale

3.8 4
by Lydia Dabcovich (Illustrator)
 

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A lonely old woman adopts, cares for, and raises a polar bear as if he were her own son, until jealous villagers threaten the bear's life, forcing him to leave his home and his "mother," in a retelling of a traditional Inuit folktale.

Overview

A lonely old woman adopts, cares for, and raises a polar bear as if he were her own son, until jealous villagers threaten the bear's life, forcing him to leave his home and his "mother," in a retelling of a traditional Inuit folktale.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A whimsical tale in which an old Eskimo-Inuit woman adopts an orphan polar bear cub that provides food for her as it grows up. When the men of the village grow jealous of the animal's superior hunting ability and decide to kill it, she sends it away. . . . Illustrated in muted pastel colors, the pictures capture this stark, yet beautiful, winter world. The clothing styles are of Greenland Inuit but the landscape could be anywhere in the Arctic. The author gives explanations about the background and her research into Inuit tales. A heartwarming selection to fill requests for multicultural picture books and/or books on this region." School Library Journal
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2A whimsical tale in which an old Eskimo-Inuit woman adopts an orphan polar bear cub that provides food for her as it grows up. When the men of the village grow jealous of the animal's superior hunting ability and decide to kill it, she sends it away. For years afterward, she walks far out on the ice and meets the bear, who brings her salmon and seal. The story gives a picture of motherly love toward an "adopted child," one the woman will love always. "Little Bear," a selection in The Dancing Fox (Morrow, 1997), edited by John Bierhorst, is a similar tale, but the villains in that retelling are neighboring villagers who threaten to kill the bear since it is catching their food sources, and the woman and bear are never reunited. Thus, Polar Bear Son has a more satisfying ending. Illustrated in muted pastel colors, the pictures capture this stark, yet beautiful, winter world. The clothing styles are of Greenland Inuit but the landscape could be anywhere in the Arctic. The author gives explanations about the background and her research into Inuit tales. A heartwarming selection to fill requests for multicultural picture books and/or books on this region.Mollie Bynum, formerly at Chester Valley Elementary School, Anchorage, AK

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395975671
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/28/1999
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
181,290
Product dimensions:
10.31(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.17(d)
Lexile:
AD470L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Lydia Dabcovich is the author/illustrator of many books for children. She lives with her husband in Brookline, Massachusetts.

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Polar Bear Son: An Inuit Tale 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think it is a good book and to the warrior peopel can you guys quit i see this stuff in a lot of reviews i am getting a littel tired of it and if i am affending you sorry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kitting here? (Bb after dinner)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
??????? He looks at his mom very hungry
Anonymous More than 1 year ago