Princeless, Volume 1: Save Yourself

Princeless, Volume 1: Save Yourself

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Overview

Princeless, Volume 1: Save Yourself by Jeremy Whitley

“Funny riffs on adventure story stereotypes fill this graphic novel, and parents and educators will be delighted with the diverse characters.” -
AMightyGirl.com

Honored as an Amelia
Bloomer Project title, through the
ALA.

Adrienne Ashe never wanted to be a princess. She hates fancy dinners, is uncomfortable in lavish dresses, and has never wanted to wait on someone else to save her.


However, on the night of her
16th-birthday, her parents, the King and Queen, locked her away in a tower guarded by a dragon to await the rescue of some handsome prince. Now Adrienne has decided to take matters into her own hands!

Come join the Eisner-nominated team of
Jeremy Whitley and M. Goodwin for a tale of swashbuckling in the face of sexism.
Princeless is the action/adventure for the girl who's tired of waiting to be rescued and ready to save herself!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781939352545
Publisher: Action Lab Entertainment
Publication date: 04/01/2014
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 93,523
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile: GN440L (what's this?)
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

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Princeless, Volume 1: Save Yourself 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Adrienne Ashe doesn't want to be a princess. It's boring and, to be brutally honest, she doesn't understand why princesses always need to wait for a prince to do the rescuing anyway. That doesn't stop Adrienne's parents from locking her in a tower on her sixteenth birthday. It also doesn't stop Adrienne from bitterly complaining out the injustice and pointing out how she doesn't even look like a stupid traditional princess with her brown skin and dark, curly hair (not to mention her prowess with a sword!). Instead of pining for some handsome prince, Adrienne spends her time in the tower befriending the dragon guarding the tower. When Adrienne finds a sword hidden in the tower, she decides she has waited to be rescued long enough. With a sword in her hand and a dragon by her side, Adrienne sets out to escape the tower and rescue her other sisters in Princeless Book 1: Save Yourself (2012) by Jeremy Whitley and illustrated by M. Goodwin. Princeless Book 1: Save Yourself collects the first 4 issues of Princeless. It is the first of four bindups. There is also a spinoff series. Whitley delivers a frank and self-aware story that is refreshingly and unapologetically feminist. Adrienne is a no-nonsense heroine who isn't afraid to do what she thinks is right and point out hypocrisy and double standards when she sees them. This plays out to especially good effect when she meets up with a girl who makes armor for warriors and discovers the vast inequity between standard armor for men and women. Goodwin's illustrations bring this story to life with wry humor and charming artwork that beautifully compliments the story. The facial expressions for characters throughout are especially priceless. Princeless Book 1: Save Yourself is a great set up for this series. Whitley and Goodwin introduce many of the key players and the basic premise of the series while also delivering a lot of fun arcs along the way. This series is a delightful addition to the typical princess and anti-princess fare. Highly recommended for readers of comics, fans of fairy tales and retellings, as well as anyone looking for a new heroine to cheer on. Possible Pairings: Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine, Rapunzel's Revenge by Shannon and Dean Hale, I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest, Nimona by Noelle Stevenson, A Well-Timed Enchantment by Vivian Vande Velde, Dealing with Dragons by Patricia C. Wrede
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
One of my favorites. From the story, from the characters and well the overall tone for this was really good. Also can I say that the art style was really good, even adorable? Looking forward to the next one.
Sorrel More than 1 year ago
Great graphic novel series for girls of all ages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am so glad that this series is garnering a lot of attention. There are a lot of people, kids and adults, that I think would benefit from reading this. The fact that the book is so popular is a positive sign that the comics industry and girl geeks are ready for a change. We can start replacing all the stereotypical princess stuff with actual, cool, relatable princess stuff. Adrienne and Bedelia are the type of heroes I'd still love to aspire to be. Confident, strong (physically, emotionally, etc.), talented. These are traits that we're told are associated with Disney Princesses, but they all still needed a prince to come and rescue them.