Quintessential Filipino Cooking: 75 Authentic and Classic Recipes of the Philippines

Quintessential Filipino Cooking: 75 Authentic and Classic Recipes of the Philippines

by Liza Agbanlog

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781624145483
Publisher: Page Street Publishing
Publication date: 08/14/2018
Pages: 192
Sales rank: 307,514
Product dimensions: 8.03(w) x 8.86(h) x 0.56(d)

About the Author

Liza Agbanlog is the founder of the blog Salu Salo Recipes. She is originally from the Philippines and lives in Vancouver, Canada.

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CHAPTER 1

LUTUING BABOY AT BAKA

PORK AND BEEF DISHES

Pork is arguably the most popular meat in Filipino cuisine. At any big Filipino gathering, a whole roasted pig, called lechon, is generally the centerpiece of the buffet table. It is usually served whole, after being roasted over a fire pit. As is typical in Filipino cooking, no part of the pig goes unused. For example, parts of the head and liver are used to make sisig (chopped pork with onion and lemon), while the blood is used to make dinuguan (pork blood stew). Other parts of the pig, such as the heart, intestines and kidneys, are also used in Filipino dishes.

Although not as popular as chicken and pork, there are still some dishes in Filipino cooking where beef is the focal point of the dish. Examples of these dishes include mechado (beef stew in tomato sauce), bistek (beef steak) and kare-kare (oxtail stew in peanut sauce).

PORK RIBS ADOBO

These mouth-watering and fall-off-the-bone-tender ribs are one of my family's favorite adobo dishes. I recommend using pork back ribs since they take on the adobo flavor well and will give you more flavorful ribs. Although using pork ribs in this adobo recipe puts a different spin on the Filipino classic, it still uses the simplest approach of cooking adobo. All of the ingredients are combined in the pan and simmered until tender — it doesn't get any easier than that!

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

3 lb (1.3 kg) pork back ribs, cut into individual rib segments
Combine the pork, vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, bay leaves, pepper and water in a heavy pan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, cover and simmer until the pork is tender, about 1 hour. Stir occasionally and add ½ cup (120 ml) of water each time as needed, making sure the ribs are covered in the sauce.

Uncover the pan and reduce the liquid until it starts to glaze, about 15 to 20 minutes.

Remove the bay leaves. Transfer the ribs onto a serving plate. Pour the sauce over the ribs and serve.

ADOBONG PUTI

(WHITE PORK ADOBO)

This dish gets its name from the fact that there is no soy sauce used. In a typical Filipino adobo dish, soy sauce is used to give it a darker color and salty taste. This version uses salt in place of soy sauce, giving it a lighter color and different flavor. Give this one a try if you are looking for a different take on Filipino adobo.
YIELD: 4 SERVINGS
2 lb (900 g) skinless pork belly or shoulder, cut into 2-inch (5-cm) cubes
In a heavy pan, combine the pork, water, vinegar, garlic, peppercorns, bay leaves and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, and cook covered until the meat is fork tender, about 1 hour. Check and stir periodically making sure that there is still a good amount of liquid, adding water in ½ cup (120 ml) increments as needed.

When the pork is tender, remove the lid and continue to simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated and the pork starts to render fat, about 12 minutes. Drain the excess oil.

Remove the bay leaves. Serve with steamed rice.

SKINLESS LONGGANISA

(PORK SAUSAGE)

Longganisa is a pork sausage that is typically served for breakfast. Although longganisa can be bought at a Filipino market, making your own longganisa lets you choose what to put in it and gives you room to experiment. This version is skinless and doesn't use any casing; instead, the filling is individually wrapped in wax paper and frozen so that the sausage stays together when cooking. The sausages may be thawed first before frying, or fried frozen instead if you are pressed for time. Either way, these pork sausages are best served with a sunny side up egg for a satisfying breakfast.

YIELD: 28 SAUSAGES

2 lb (900 g) lean ground pork
In a large bowl, combine the ground pork, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly.

Place 1½ tablespoons (20 g) of the mixture on a piece of wax paper. Shape the mixture into a log, roll as tightly as you can and twist both ends of the wax paper to seal. Repeat the process for the rest of the mixture.

Place the rolled sausages in a container with a lid and store in the freezer for 2 hours or until ready to cook.

To cook, unwrap the frozen sausages and fry in batches in hot vegetable oil until cooked through, about 5 to 6 minutes per batch. Drain on paper towels.

Serve with rice, a fried egg and Vinegar Garlic Sauce on the side.

NOTE: The frozen sausages may be thawed 2 hours before frying. If you are planning to have it for breakfast, thaw in the refrigerator the night before.

TOKWA'T BABOY

(FRIED TOFU AND PORK)

Tokwa't baboy is an appetizer that you will most likely find at the center of the table, and is usually enjoyed with an ice-cold beer. It can also be enjoyed as a side dish for lugaw (congee, or rice porridge). Classically, it is a dish made of cubed fried tofu, boiled chopped pork ears and pork belly, served with a dipping sauce of soy sauce and vinegar on the side. This recipe is a slight variation that uses the same cooking method, but without the pork ears. The soy sauce–vinegar mixture is also incorporated into the dish during cooking.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

1 lb (450 g) skinless pork belly, cut in half lengthwise
In a large pot, bring the pork belly, water, salt, onion, bay leaves and peppercorns to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until tender, about 1 hour. Drain the pork and reserve 1 cup (240 ml) of the broth. Let the pork cool slightly and then slice it into bite-size pieces. Set aside.

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and fry until brown and crispy, about 3 minutes. Drain on paper towels and cut into ½-inch (13-mm) cubes. Set aside.

Remove all but 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of the oil from the pan and place it back over medium heat. Add the shallots and sauté for about 1 minute. Add the garlic and sauté for another 30 seconds. Add the vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, reserved pork broth and Thai chile.

Bring to a boil and stir in the pork belly and tofu. Simmer for a few minutes to allow the pork and tofu to absorb the sauce.

Transfer to a bowl and garnish with green onions.

GROUND PORK MENUDO

Menudo is a Spanish-influenced stew that is popular in Fillipino cuisine. Traditional menudo is commonly eaten for lunch or dinner and consists of cubes of pork simmered in tomato sauce, with vegetables added afterwards. This recipe uses ground pork instead, which is a practical variation and an easy way of making menudo.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

2 tbsp (30 ml) olive oil
Heat the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and onion, and sauté until the onion begins to soften, about 2 minutes.

Add the ground pork and cook, stirring regularly, for 5 minutes or until the meat is lightly browned. Stir in the fish sauce.

Add the tomato sauce and water. Stir, cover and cook on medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the carrots, potato and bell pepper, and cook for 10 minutes. Add the green peas and raisins, and cook for another 5 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve with steamed rice.

CRISPY PORK BINAGOONGAN

(CRISPY PORK WITH SHRIMP PASTE)

This dish is always a hit when I make it for my family. We like to pair it with eggplant omelets, or with boiled or grilled vegetables. There are many ways to make this dish, but this way of making binagoongan is my family's favorite. I learned this method from a family member who I've always thought of as a good cook during my recent visit to the Philippines.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

1 lb (450 g) skinless pork belly, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces
In a medium pot, bring the pork, garlic, vinegar, water, peppercorns and bay leaf to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, covered, until the meat is fork tender, about 30 minutes. Remove the pork from the broth, reserving ¾ cup (180 ml) of the broth. Pat the pork thoroughly dry with paper towels. Set aside.

In a pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the pork and fry over medium heat until brown and crispy, about 10 minutes. Transfer the pork onto a paper towel–lined plate.

Remove all but 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of oil from the pan. Reheat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and onion, and sauté until the onion begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Add the tomato and sauté until soft, about 1 minute.

Stir in the crispy pork. Add the shrimp paste and stir to combine. Add the reserved broth and cook, stirring for 1 minute.

Serve with steamed rice and grilled vegetables.

BAKED LECHON KAWALI

(CRISPY PORK BELLY)

Lechon kawali is a popular Filipino dish consisting of pork belly that is boiled until tender and then deep–fried until brown and crispy. This recipe is a variation that uses the oven instead of a deep fryer, but doesn't sacrifice flavor or texture. Using the oven makes this dish easier to prepare and it will still be crispy on the outside, yet moist on the inside.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

2 lb (900 g) boneless pork belly, skin on
Place the pork and water in a stockpot. Add the garlic, salt, bay leaves and peppercorns, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, and cook until the meat is fork tender, about 1½ hours. Drain the pork belly and discard the broth.

Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C).

Transfer the pork skin-side up onto a rack placed on a foil-lined baking sheet. Using a fork, poke the pork's skin several times along the surface. Pat the pork thoroughly dry with paper towels.

Bake the pork until brown and crispy, about 2 hours. Let it cool slightly and then slice into serving pieces. Serve with the Vinegar Garlic Sauce.

PORK AFRITADA

(PORK BRAISED IN TOMATO SAUCE)

Afritada is a tomato-based stew made with either chicken or pork and a variety of vegetables. It is similar to kaldereta, mechado and menudo in that they are all tomato-based stews, but this pork afritada is my family's favorite. We can't get enough of the tender pieces of pork and vegetables, especially when we have it with a bowl of rice or bread.

YIELD: 6 SERVINGS

2 lb (900 g) pork shoulder, cut into 2-inch (5-cm) cubes
Heat the oil in a heavy pan over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and onion, and sauté until the onion begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Add the tomato and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes.

Stir in the fish sauce. Add the pork and sauté until browned and no longer pink, about 5 minutes.

Add the tomato sauce and water, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium, cover and simmer, stirring regularly and adding more water as needed. Continue to simmer for 45 minutes or until the pork is tender.

Add the potato, carrot and bell pepper, and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

KARE-KARE

(OXTAIL WITH VEGETABLES IN PEANUT SAUCE)

Kare-kare is a popular stew known for its distinct and savory peanut sauce. Beyond the sauce, oxtail or pork hock is the main focus and is accompanied by a mixture of fresh vegetables. The more daring and adventurous may also add tripe. Kare-kare is not an everyday dish, but is served during special occasions, events or holidays.

YIELD: 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

3 lb (1.3 kg) oxtail, cut into 2-inch (5-cm) pieces
In a stockpot, bring the oxtail, water and salt to a boil. Lower the heat to medium and cook, covered until tender, about 1½ hours. Remove the oxtail from the broth and set aside.

Add the green beans and eggplant to the broth in the pan. Cook for 5 minutes. Add the bok choy and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 2 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the broth and set aside. Reserve 3 cups (700 ml) of the broth.

Heat the oil in a wok or pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and onion, and sauté until the onion begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Add the annatto powder and shrimp paste, and stir to combine. Add the reserved 3 cups (700 ml) of broth, increase the heat to medium- high and bring the mixture to a boil. Add the oxtail and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the peanut butter and cook for 2 minutes. Add the mochiko mixture, and cook until the sauce thickens, about 1 minute. Add the vegetables and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Serve hot with steamed rice and sautéed shrimp paste.

NOTE:Mochiko is sweet rice powder that is sold at any Asian supermarket. Cornstarch may be used instead.

BEEF MECHADO

(BEEF STEW IN TOMATO SAUCE)

This Spanish-influenced dish consists of slowly simmered beef in a tangy tomato sauce. Chunks of potatoes and bell peppers complete this hearty stew. When making beef mechado, it is important that the meat is slowly cooked over a long period of time, which makes it tender and flavorful. Alternatively, mechado can be made with pork or chicken, but beef mechado is the most common.

YIELD: 4 SERVINGS

2 lb (900 g) stewing beef, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes
Season the beef with salt and pepper.

In a pan, heat 3 tablespoons (45 ml) of oil over medium-high heat. Add the beef and cook in batches until all sides are browned, about 4 minutes per batch. Remove the beef and its juices from the pan and set aside.

Using the same pan, add the remaining 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of oil. Add the garlic, onion and tomatoes. Sauté until the onion begins to soften, about 2 minutes.

Return the browned beef and its accumulated juices to the pan. Add the soy sauce, lemon juice, bay leaves and water. Bring the mixture to a boil, cover and continue to simmer over medium heat until the beef is tender, about 1 hour. Stir periodically and check if there is still a good amount of liquid, adding water in ½ cup (120 ml) increments as needed.

Add the bell peppers and potatoes. Stir and cook covered until the potatoes are tender, about 10 to 12 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Remove the bay leaves and serve with steamed rice.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Quintessential Filipino Cooking"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Liza Agbanlog.
Excerpted by permission of Page Street Publishing Co..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Introduction 9

Lutuing Baboy at Baka: (Pork in Beef Dishes) 11

Pork Ribs Adobo 13

Adobong Puti (White Pork Adobo) 14

Skinless Longganisa (Pork Sausage) 17

Tokwa't Baboy (Fried Tofu and Pork) 18

Ground Pork Menudo 21

Crispy Pork Binagoongan (Crispy Pork with Shrimp Paste) 22

Baked Lechon Kawali (Crispy Pork Belly) 25

Pork Afritada (Pork Braised in Tomato Sauce) 26

Kare-Kare (Oxtail with Vegetables in Peanut Sauce) 29

Beef Mochado (Beef Stew in Tomato Sauce) 30

Beef Pares (Braised Beef Brisket) 33

Paksiw na Pata (Braised Pork Hock in Vinegar and Soy Sauce) 34

Lutuing Manok (Chicken Dishes) 37

Fried Chicken 39

Chicken Hamonado (Chicken in Pineapple Sauce) 40

Chicken Salpicao (Stir-Fried Garlic Chicken) 43

Patis Wings (Chicken Wings with Fish Sauce) 44

Chicken Pochero (Chicken and Vegetable Stew) 47

Adobong Dilaw (Adobo with Turmeric) 48

Chicken Bicol Express (Spicy Chicken in Coconut Milk) 51

Chicken Kaldereta (Chicken in Tomato Liver Sauce) 52

Chicken Barbecue 55

Chicken Inasal (Grilled Lemongrass Chicken) 56

Pagkaing-Dagat (Seafood Dishes) 59

Fish Escabeche (Sweet and Sour Fish) 61

Crab in Oyster Sauce 62

Ginataang Hipon (Shrimp in Coconut Milk) 65

Paksiw na Isda (Fish in Vinegar Sauce) 66

Sarciadong Isda (Fried Fish with Tomato Sauce) 69

Squid Sisig 70

Bistek na Bangus (Fish Steak) 73

Guisadong Toge at Hipon (Sautéed Bean Sprouts and Shrimp) 74

Daing na Bangus (Fried Marinated Milkfish) 77

Kanin at Pancit (Rice at Noodle Dishes) 79

Sinangag (Garlic Rice) 81

Champorado (Chocolate Rice Porridge) 82

Seafood Paella 85

Sotanghon Guisado (Sautéed Bean Thread Noodles) 86

Pancit Palabek (Noodles in Special Sauce) 89

Lutuing Gulay (Vegetable Dishes) 91

Fresh Lumpia (Spring Rolls) 93

Ginisang Ampalaya (Sautéed Bitter Melon) 94

Pinakbet (Boiled Vegetables in Anchovy Sauce) 97

Ginataang Gulay (Vegetables in Coconut Milk) 98

Ginisang Patola at Misua (Sautéed Sponge Gourd with Noodles) 101

Ginisang Kabute sa Bayabas (Sautéed Mushrooms with Guava) 102

Lumpiang Gulay (Vegetable Spring Roll) 105

Sabaw (Soups) 107

Almondigas (Meatballs and Noodle Soup) 109

Sinampalukang Manok (Chicken Tamarind Soup) 110

Bulalo (Bone Marrow Soup) 113

Pancit Molo (Pork Dumpling Soup) 114

Fish Tinola (Fish in Lemongrass Soup) 117

Lomi Soup 118

Sinigang na Isda sa Miso (Fish in Tamarind Miso Soup) 121

Pork in Guava Soup 122

Munggo Soup (Mung Bean Soup) 125

Suwam na Halaan (Clam in Ginger Soup) 126

Merienda (Snacks) 129

Lumpiang Shanghai (Pork Spring Rolls) 131

Banana Cue (Caramelized Fried Banana) 132

Ginataang Mais (Sticky Rice and Corn in Coconut Milk) 135

Palitaw (Boiled Rice Cake) 136

Maruya (Banana Fritters) 139

Kalabasang Ukoy (Squash Fritters) 140

Baked Chicken Empanada 143

Panghimagas (Desserts) 145

Leche Flan (Caramel Custard) 147

Biko (Sweet Rice Cake) 148

Mango Turon (Fried Banana Mange Roll) 151

Ginataang Bilo Bilo (Sticky Rice Balls in Coconut Milk) 152

Buko Salad (Young Coconut Salad) 155

Filipino Macaroons 156

Mango Ice Cream 159

Pichi Pichi (Steamed Sweet Cassava) 160

Sawsawan at Ensalada (Dipping Sauces and Accompaniments) 163

Vinegar Garlic Sauce 165

Sweet and Sour Sauce 166

Acharang Pipino (Pickled Cucumber) 169

Achara (Pickled Green Papaya) 170

Tomato and Salted Egg Salad 173

Ensaladang Mangga (Green Mango Salad) 174

Ensaladang Talong (Eggplant Salad) 177

Acknowledgements 179

About the Author 181

Index 182

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