Reality's Ascent

Reality's Ascent

by R. L. Copple

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Overview

The battles within define us more than those without. Sisko fights against his failures and guilt. Nathan wrestles against the expectations of his father. Kaylee struggles against her insecurities with men. They all seek to rescue Gabrielle from the deceptions and traps of the demon Beltrid and his wizard.

R. L. Copple spins a fantasy tale of middle grade and young adult adventures in a fairy-tale, parallel world including magic, a troll, ghosts, sword fighting, a sky island, a wizard maze, among others, and the return of Joel from Reality's Dawn. Journey with Sisko and Kaylee as they face their destinies with the ring and discover...

...Reality has ascended, and no soul will remain untouched.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780986451799
Publisher: Splashdown Books
Publication date: 05/01/2011
Series: Reality Chronicles , #2
Pages: 228
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.48(d)

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Reality's Ascent 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
SherryT2011 More than 1 year ago
A couple of years ago, R L Copple wrote a series of short stories, all taking place in his fantasy "Reality" universe. Volume one, titled "Reality's Dawn" was almost more of a novel than a short story anthology, since all of the stories had overlapping characters--in particular the main character, Sisko--and the stories were chronological @ interconnected. Mr. Copple has followed the anthology with a second book in a projected trilogy, "Reality's Ascent", which is the subject of this review. You can read this book without having read the first volume, but I think you'll enjoy it more if you read the books in chronological order. This 2nd volume is a fantasy/spiritual adventure novel, with a strong emphasis on characterization. It is suitable for older young adults and for adults. While there is typical fantasy violence, it's not gruesome, and the language is clean. One brief memory of a non-explicit sexual situation toward the end of the book might be a good chance for an adult-child discussion. "Ascent" has echoes of the first volume, "Dawn" - Sisko, his wife Gabrielle and several other characters reappear, though now they are twenty years older. A few of the locations are the same. There's a hint of self-contained stories-often punctuated with the fulfillment of a part of the family's quest-within this intricate tale, but probably only if you're looking for that pattern like I was. Sisko is the point of view character in the first third of this novel-just as he was throughout the first volume. Then his daughter, Kaylee, takes over. I found this disconcerting briefly but I got used to it. In any case, Mr. Copple chose wisely when he made the switch. In addition to the wonderful characters we followed in "Dawn"--like Josh, Seth and Joel-- we now have the pleasure of meeting Sisko's children. Kaylee and Nathan are about sixteen years old, talented sword-fighters, and devoted to each other. Neither is quite mature yet. Nathan has trouble controlling his anger, he's impulsive, and sometimes he is not perceptive about people. On the other hand, Kaylee still needs to learn that she can't always be in control in every relationship. Meanwhile, Sisko himself in ultimately faced with a critical decision. The intriguing and mysterious character named Joel returns from "Dawn", much to my delight. He appears off-and-on in virtually the whole second half of the book. Even though he spends a lot of time "on stage", I wanted to see even more of him. (I'm still trying to nail down who/what he is. I have a theory. ;-P ) Near the beginning of the story, Gabrielle, Sisko's wife, is imprisoned in a piece of crystal by a sorcerous demon named Beltrid. This horrible act kicks off the mission taken on by the rest of the family. Gabrielle can only be freed if the family finds seven tiny crystalline keys to open her imprisoning crystal. Each key represents a virtue, like Hospitality and Contentment. Beltrid inflicts this task on the family, not only to torment them but because he wants the ring that Sisko has been wearing for the last twenty-plus years. The ring is magical and has healing properties amongst other powers but it can only be used at the will of God. (Beltrid doesn't seem to "get" this.) The need for trust-in other people and in God-is a thread that weaves through the last half of the novel and really gripped me. While this book is anything