Revelation (Rai-kirah Series #2)

Revelation (Rai-kirah Series #2)

by Carol Berg

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451458421
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/07/2001
Series: Rai-kirah Series , #2
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 496
Sales rank: 680,949
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.29(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Though Colorado is home, Carol Berg's roots are in Texas, in a family of teachers, musicians, and railroad men. She has degrees in mathematics from Rice University and computer science from the University of Colorado, but managed to squeeze in minors in English and art history along the way. She has combined a career as a software engineer with her writing, while also raising three sons. She lives with her husband at the foot of the Colorado mountains.

Table of Contents

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Revelation (Rai-kirah Series #2) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
PhoenixFalls More than 1 year ago
Sadly, Revelation is nowhere near as involving as Transformation was. While Transformation was flawed, its beating heart was the relationship between Seyonne and Aleksander, and that relationship was almost completely absent in this follow-up. Instead, the novel follows Seyonne back to Ezzaria and then through several large set-pieces, each of which felt too dragged out. None of the new characters grabbed me, and the resolution was obvious from 200 pages away. I think the major flaw in this novel is its female characters. Carol Berg has admitted that writing women did not come naturally to her, and I think that is fairly obvious in Revelation. The story revolves around Seyonne's relationship with three women: his Aife Fiona, his wife Ysanne, and the demoness Vallynne. The plot rests on whether or not each of these women will trust him. And unfortunately, none of them is ever explored enough for the reader to make any sense of their decisions. Fiona in particular is given a clunky backstory at the very end of the novel that explains everything while explaining nothing. Each of the women was extraordinarily interesting in theory and completely flat in practice. Still, it was a decent novel. Berg's writing is never painful, though her pacing continues to be problematic, and when I think about the novel I can see the bones of a brilliant story. It is definitely strong enough (and leaves enough unresolved, though the novel has enough of an ending to satisfy temporarily) for me to read the final volume. I just hope that Aleksander returns and that Fiona, at the very least, is made more real than she was in this novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought the first one was way better. I thought this book was a little annoying because of the fact that Seyonne goes off on another path for a while and totallly forgets what he's supposed to be doing.This was the longest part of the book too and I was all like dude get on with it already and go back on the main story. However the author provides enough points of interest from the beginning of the book to make you want to keep reading and see what happens. Another thing i didn't like was that the lovely Prince Alekzander barely made an appearance in this book which was disappointing for me cause I really liked him! Well it doesn't take away from the book though and the author introduces some other good new characters. My final point is this: HASN'T SEYONNE SUFFERED ENOUGH! Geez he goes through sooooo much in this book I feel so bad for him. Well in the end it's still a good book and makes you really want to read the third one.
starstorm on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Revelation continues the story begun in Transformation (and thankfully received a better cover artist! :). Returned to his people after spending half his life in captivity, Seyonne struggles to re-integrate himself into his former life. But a recent troubling experience has him questioning the most basic tenets of his Warden's training, and leads him into a dangerous quest to find out the truth about the so-called demons he has sworn to fight. As always, Berg's superb character-driven storytelling is a treat to read.
surreality on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Plot: The typical result of what happens when a solid first book is written and suddenly sequels need to happen. A vague plotline from Transformation is picked up and desperately blown up to size. There's never a real point to the story, and half the time it's unclear what the characters actually want to do.Characters: Goodbye character development. The new ones are cardboard, the old ones become static. Style: Nothing excellent and nothing bad - somewhere in the middle for the genre. The lack of worldbuilding from the first book now bites the story in the ass. Plus: The cover art has improved. Minus: A totally unnecessary sequel.Summary: The series jumped the shark with this volume.
MuseofIre on LibraryThing 11 months ago
The middle section of Berg's Rai-Kirah series continues strong, with the kind of writing that has made me late for work more than once as I continue to read "just one more chapter." Seyonne is an admirable hero, with an unconquerable core of stubborn integrity that leads him to question everything he has been taught about the nature of demonkind and Ezzaria, even if it means alienating everyone he has ever loved. I have never liked Ysanne or thought she was worthy of Seyonne. Fiona is a much better match for him, and I'm sure they'll wind up together
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Carol Berg spins an intricate tail of love, deception, and one man's torture inside the land of demons. The book locks the reader's attention in within the first few pages and does not let go until the last sentence, and still the reader does not know enough to just leave it alone. Twists and turns are what kept me in, but the 1st person perspective of the book is always a risky move in my opinion. That would probably be the reason I gave this book 4 stars instead of 5.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just got this book today, and I've read 150 pages in one sitting! This one is just as good as TRANSFORMATION. Highly recommended! Please keep writing, Ms. Berg. I will read anything you put out there.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the best books I have ever read. I am so tired of overused fantasy plotlines and devices, and have recently stopped reading two other books in the middle because I couldn't stand the cliches for even one more agonizing page. This book was not -at all- like those. I devoured this book over the course of three days; couldn't put it down. And it was not less than three days because I had to do things like work, and try not to annoy my wife as I waved her away so I could read some more. The moral dilemmas that Seyonne encounters in this book are phenomenal. Carol Berg has a strong talent for weaving a masterful tale, this book surprised me more than once - there were times I had to put the book down for a little while just to get over the shock of some event or piece of information learned in the book. Seyonne is forced to examine the very nature of his existence and the goodness of his people. Ironicly, he manages to alienate all of his friends in his struggle to help them, and ends up in some very unlikely places. Watching Seyonne struggle with his belief system as he shifts his paradigms....awesome. Realistic. Engrossing. Not at all like the typical fantasy novel where good and evil are so clear cut (read: boring). Were I as good a writer as Carol Berg, perhaps I could convey to you how powerful this book is. A MUST read. I'm recommending it to all my friends.