Spalding's World Tour: The Epic Adventure that Took Baseball Around the Globe - And Made it America's Game

Spalding's World Tour: The Epic Adventure that Took Baseball Around the Globe - And Made it America's Game

by Mark Lamster

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781586485955
Publisher: PublicAffairs
Publication date: 08/05/2007
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 1,176,637
File size: 4 MB

About the Author

Mark Lamster is senior acquisitions editor at Princeton Architectural Press in New York. His writing on baseball, history, design, and architecture has appeared in numerous publications, including the New York Times, the New York Times Book Review, Metropolis, I.D., and Architecture. Lamster lives in New York City and is an active member of the Society of American Baseball Research.

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Spalding's World Tour: A Gilded Age Adventure and the Birth of Modern Baseball 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
jztemple on LibraryThing 17 days ago
This is a surprisingly interesting book even if you aren't a baseball fan. An enterprising team owner and upcoming sports equipment magnate, Spalding sought to gain more visibility for the American pastime by doing exhibition games around the world over the course of six months in 1888-89. The book really is much more about the experiences of a group of Americans, mostly young men (several wives came along), visiting exotic places and behaving like, well, a bunch of young men would on a rather incredible road trip. Lamster is a very good writer who carries the story along with fun anecdotes and never bogs down in moralizing or schmaltz. Highly recommended.
KApplebaum on LibraryThing 17 days ago
Some things never change -- greedy baseball players, greedy owners, rowdy fans who want to drink beer on Sundays. Almost hard to believe this all happened more than a century ago.