Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor

Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor

by James M. Scott

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393352276
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 04/04/2016
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 672
Sales rank: 114,063
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.40(d)

About the Author

James M. Scott is the author of Rampage, Target Tokyo, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; The War Below, and The Attack on the Liberty. He lives in Charleston, South Carolina.

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Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is simply riveting.   While Target Tokyo is a historical text, it reads like a classic novel.  The depth of research is astounding, and clearly reflects the author's dedication to uncovering disparate historical facts.  It combines the emotions associated with patriotism, military valor, human sensitivity, and man's indomitable spirit.  This book brought me to tears in admiration of what truly was our "greatest generation."     
BHull More than 1 year ago
Simply put, this is a wonderful book. Mr. Scott is an amazing author. He may even be a better historian and researcher. This is a "Big" book, but I read it in a weekend. Could not put it down. I have read all of his books and have shared each of them with family and friends. They, too, have been amazed at the depth of this writer's research and detail. Buy it and read it. You will be happy you did. As with all great books from the best writers, the only disappointment is that the book end! Can't wait for whatever is next.
nicelady3 More than 1 year ago
I have read all of Mr. Scott's books and they keep getting better. Target Tokyo is absolutely thrilling, beautifully written and masterfully researched. Whatever one may have heard or read about Jimmy Doolittle's raid, this book brings it to life in breathtaking detail, from our grim and spiraling losses at Pearl Harbor all the way through to the trials of some of Japan's vilest prison guards and commanders. The horrors of their behavior have been paraded on the world stage for decades and no more clearly than in Target Tokyo, yet to this day Japan has chosen not to issue a formal apology for their horrendous behavior. Not even to the Chinese, who they brutalized nearly beyond comprehension. Mr. Scott's skills as a naval historian run deep, yet nowhere is he more compelling than in his vibrant descriptions of the individual airmen who volunteered for a mission that they surely understood would probably be their last, such were the imminent dangers. Three cheers to Jimmy Doolittle, those who helped plan the raid, and to the extremely talented James Scott.
paradiserunner More than 1 year ago
Flight to Eternity James Scott’s latest book, “Target Tokyo,” vaults him into the upper echelons of naval historians and American storytellers. Throughout this astounding book, the heroism of Doolittle and his 79 fellow raiders radiates like a blast furnace. Scott’s soaring literary skills portray an America caught asleep at the switch at Pearl, but a government, military and public that were ripe for a dramatic counterattack against Japan. FDR’s goal was to convince Japan that in attacking the United States they had picked a fight with precisely the wrong opponent. Once the outline of the attack on Tokyo crystalized, it was clear that the leader of such a dangerous, high profile mission had to be extraordinary. Fortunately, that person stood ready to rendezvous with history: brilliant, feisty Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle. Every ounce of Doolittle’s towering flying and leadership skills were leveraged. His young airmen all volunteered and remained committed to striking back at Japan in the face of clear evidence that they were likely signing their own death warrants. In fact, even after rigorous planning which included intense training in the amazing feat of flying fully loaded B-25 bombers off an aircraft carrier, their ship, the USS Hornet, was spotted by the Japanese too soon. The early launch that this precipitated assured that all 16 of the crews would run out of gas and crash land if not get shot down first. And crash they did: fifteen in China, the planned destination, and one in Russia. Scott’s description of the crews’ fate after Tokyo is both stomach turning and uplifting as the men’s valor withstood every blow. It takes a steady handed master researcher and writer to keep the reader glued to every page, every detail. And the author does just that. Scott makes it clear that in exchange for the raiders’ heroic success and the bombing damage they dealt, including 87 dead, and the huge boost to American morale, the Allies paid a horrific price. While Japan worried over even the possibility that its homeland could be reached by enemy planes, it orchestrated massive PR efforts which trumped U.S. publicity efforts. Far worse, Japan took out most of its vengeance on China where over 250,000 civilians were slaughtered, often in ways nearly too vile to imagine with Nanking in the eye of this ghastly slaughter. Scott’s thorough research radiates every page. You are there with Doolittle and his men from pre-mission bravura right through to the suffering and death they endured and the celebrations the survivors basked in. These were our nation’s sons, husbands, and buddies. Their humanity glows throughout: “Shorty Manch appeared alongside Ted Lawson’s Ruptured Duck with a fruitcake tin in hand. ‘Hey,’ he shouted up to bombardier Bob Clever. ‘Will you-all do a fellow a big favor and carry my phonograph records under your seat? I’ll take my record-player along in my plane and we’ll meet in Chungking and have us some razz-ma-tazz.’” The raiders’ individual personalities are so artfully etched that the reader is staggered all the more at the gruesome execution of three of Doolittle’s airmen by the Japanese: Billy Farrow, Dean Hallmark, and Harold Spatz. In the end, this reader was left holding his head even higher, even more proud of our greatest generation. Their story is one for the ages. Target Tokyo will ensure that the remarkable legacy of Jimmy Doolittle’s raiders endures.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
James Scott’s new book, “Target Tokyo,” is the most thrilling WWII book I have ever read and one of the most riveting true stories I have ever even heard about. Mr. Scott is a master, not only an incredibly talented writer but a superb researcher. He paints a vivid picture of how Lieutenant Colonel Doolittle and his men set out on an impossible mission with tremendous enthusiasm and little apparent regard for the high likelihood that they would not survive to tell their story. Scott takes you into the lives of these incredible 80 airmen and through carefully woven writings of their own and archival material brings the entire story, from Pearl Harbor through the trials of some of the horrible Japanese captors and commanders, to life. Scott also provides fascinating insight into the propaganda war that broke out after the raid. Doolittle’s raiders explicitly tried to avoid civilians and civilian targets but the Japanese claimed just the opposite and in the court of public opinion nearly won through a sustained campaigns of lies and subterfuge. I note that to this day, Japan has yet to accept full responsibility for the horrors they unleashed in WWII, not just on the Chinese—mostly civilians-- but on virtually anyone they captured. This is a book I can not speak highly enough of and I am recommending it to all my friends. As a nation we should never forget Jimmy Doolittle and his raiders. They gave America a shot in the arm when we probably needed it the most. Six stars if I could give that many.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
By far the best account of this event in WW II A real in-depth writing complete with details I did not know
Anonymous 8 months ago
KristinAZ 8 months ago
I couldn't put this down. If people in my generation (under 40) knew how interesting REAL life is, they would drop all the fiction junk out there. What unbelievably brave men, and what a well-written book!
NavalDaughterWWII More than 1 year ago
Wonderful book! So meticulously researched. I enjoyed reading this book very much.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An engrossing read shedding light upon an event I had only heard about in hollywood headlines. I marveled at the level of research evidenced by Mr. Scott. The consequence of the raid experienced by the Chinese was startling...more Chinese were killed as a consequence of the raid than there were Japanese killed by the 2 atomic bombs AND the next largest one day bombing deaths of 89,000. The manner in which the US government handled the reporting of the raid reflects a common response still evidenced today, viz. that the 'cover up is worst than the actual event'. The reporting of the Japanese atrocities and the experiences of the crews after the raid was compelling and sobering. A book that should be read by all with an interest in history and humanity.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
sainthelenaislandman More than 1 year ago
Flight to Eternity James Scott’s latest book, “Target Tokyo,” vaults him into the upper echelons of naval if not all historians and American storytellers.  While many readers have seen assorted, typically brief references to Jimmy Doolittle’s earthshaking raid on Tokyo in April of 1942, “Target Tokyo” brilliantly chronicles the entire sequence of events in a compelling narrative, from the agonies of Pearl Harbor through the post-war trials of Japanese war criminals that alternately gratified and stunned the world with their unheralded and unjustified leniency.  Through it all, the heroism of Doolittle and his 79 fellow raiders radiates like a blast furnace. Scott quickly demonstrates his soaring literary skills in portraying an America that was caught asleep at the switch at Pearl, but one whose government, military and public were ripe for a dramatic counterattack against Japan.  As Scott makes clear, FDR, along with bombastic Chief of Naval Operations Ernest King, affable Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces Henry “Hap” Arnold and their senior staff were eager to begin planning for a high profile assault on Japan’s evil war machine headquartered in Tokyo.  The goal was to convince Japan, as their own naval chief Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto had warned repeatedly, that in attacking the United States they had picked a fight with precisely the wrong opponent.  Once the broad outline of the effort to attack Tokyo directly crystalized, it was clear that the leader of such a starkly dangerous and high profile mission had to be cut from extraordinary cloth.  Fortunately for the Allies then and all Americans today, that person stood ready to launch his team into history: brilliant, feisty Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle. Every ounce of Doolittle’s towering aeronautical and leadership skills, packed into a lean 5’4” frame, were brought to bear on the raid.  The young airmen who joined the mission were all volunteers and remained committed to striking back at Japan in the face of mounting evidence that in doing so they were likely signing their own death warrants.  As it happened, even after rigorous planning which included intense training and practice in the previously unheard of feat of flying fully loaded B-25 bombers off an aircraft carrier, their ship, the USS Hornet, was spotted by the Japanese hundreds of miles farther from Tokyo than had been planned.  This fact alone and the early launch that it precipitated virtually assured that all 16 of the bomber crews would run out of gas and crash land if not get shot down first. And crash land they did: fifteen in China, the predetermined destination-- though not once on a designated field-- and one in Russia.  For anyone still breathing normally after reading about the raid itself, Scott’s description of the fate of the crews after Tokyo manages to be at once wrenching if not stomach turning and uplifting as the men’s valor withstood every blow.  It takes a steady handed master researcher and writer to keep the reader glued to every page, every detail, every heart stopping danger, every bomb and every shot.  And the author does precisely that. Throughout the book, Mr. Scott makes it clear that in exchange for the raiders’ heroic success and the bombing damage they dealt, including 87 dead, and the tremendous boost to American morale, the Allies paid a horrific price.  While Japan wrung its hands over even the possibility that its homeland could be reached by enemy planes and outright lied when it claimed that the raiders had deliberately targeted civilians, it orchestrated massive public relations efforts which often trumped publicity efforts in the U.S. and abroad.  Far worse, Japan took out the worst of its vengeance on China where over 250,000 civilians were slaughtered, often in ways nearly too vile to imagine with Nanking in the eye of this ghastly hurricane.  Thus in exchange for a few hundred casualties of their own and a spray of damaged facilities, Japan murdered over a quarter million innocent human beings. Scott’s penchant for thorough research, which took him around the globe, shows through on every page of Target Tokyo.  His liberal use of direct quotes from those directly involved in the raid and those in close observance makes the entire story spring to life in vivid detail.  For all intents and purposes, you are right there with Doolittle and his men from pre-mission bravura right through to the suffering and death they endured and the celebrations the survivors basked in.  These were our nation’s sons, husbands, nephews, brothers and buddies.   Their humanity glows throughout: “Shorty Manch appeared alongside Ted Lawson’s Ruptured Duck with a fruitcake tin in hand.  ‘Hey,’ he shouted up to bombardier Bob Clever.  ‘Will you-all do a fellow a big favor and carry my phonograph records under your seat?   I’ll take my record-player along in my plane and we’ll meet in Chungking and have us some razz-ma-tazz.’  [flight instructor Hank] Miller stopped by as well, extending his hand for a farewell shake.  I wish to hell I could go with you.’”  The raiders’ individual personalities are so artfully etched that the reader is staggered all the more at the gruesome execution of three of Doolittle’s airmen by the Japanese: Billy Farrow, Dean Hallmark, and Harold Spatz.  Quotes from young Farrow’s pre-war writings are touching to the point of making the reader feel almost as if he or she has lost a close friend.  For that matter, it is nearly impossible to not feel a brotherly bond with Doolittle and each of his men.  Their collective sacrifices, including those associated with intense and prolonged torture, are beyond measure. In the end, this reader was left holding his head a little higher, even more proud if that is even possible of our one and only greatest generation.  Their story is one for the ages.  Target Tokyo will ensure that the remarkable legacy of Jimmy Doolittle’s raiders endures.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
chugaries More than 1 year ago
good book