The Girl in the Moss

The Girl in the Moss

by Loreth Anne White

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Overview

A shallow grave exposes deadly secrets as bestselling author Loreth Anne White brings her thrilling series of romantic suspense to its shocking conclusion…

Disgraced ex-cop Angie Pallorino is determined to make a new start for herself as a private investigator. But first, she and her lover, newly promoted homicide detective James Maddocks, attempt a quiet getaway to rekindle a romance struggling in the shadows of their careers. The peace doesn’t last long when human skeletal remains are found in a nearby mossy grove.

This decades-old mystery is just what Angie needs to establish her new career—even as it thrusts her and Maddocks back into the media spotlight, once again endangering their tenuous relationship.

Then, when Angie’s inquiry into the old crime intersects with a cold case from her own policing past—one that a detective on Maddocks’s new team is working—the investigation takes a startling twist. It puts more than Angie’s last shot at redemption and a future with Maddocks at risk. The mystery of the girl in the moss could kill her.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781503901636
Publisher: Amazon Publishing
Publication date: 06/12/2018
Series: Angie Pallorino Series , #3
Pages: 398
Sales rank: 403,606
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Loreth Anne White is an award-winning, bestselling author of romantic suspense, thrillers, and mysteries, including The Drowned Girls and The Lullaby Girl, the first two books in the Angie Pallorino series. Winner of the Daphne du Maurier Award for Excellence in Mainstream Mystery/Suspense, Loreth is also a three-time RITA finalist, plus a recipient of the Romantic Times Reviewers’ Choice Award, the National Readers’ Choice Award, the Romantic Crown for Best Romantic Suspense and Best Book Overall, and a Booksellers’ Best finalist. A former journalist who has worked in both South Africa and Canada, she now resides in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest with her family. When not writing, she skis, bikes, and hikes the trails with her dog, doing her best to avoid the bears (albeit unsuccessfully). Learn more at www.lorethannewhite.com.

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The Girl in the Moss 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
blonde_betty More than 1 year ago
The Girl in the Moss is the perfect end to the Angie Pallorino trilogy. While there are still characters I’d like to see more of (I’m looking at you Kjel), Angie’s story comes to its logical conclusion. The twists and turns are classic White and while there are good hints, I really didn’t see the end coming. I was glad I had uninterrupted time to read because once I started I wanted to keep going to the end. I voluntarily reviewed and ARC of this novel.
Amelia_Autin_Lam More than 1 year ago
As I finished this book all I could think of was the old phrase, "A riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." That perfectly describes THE GIRL IN THE MOSS, the third and final (final?) installment in the Angie Pallorino series. I'll be honest, I've had issues with Angie as a heroine in the two previous books in this series. Not so this time around. This book was truly golden from start to finish, even though you can't really call it a romantic suspense because hero James Maddocks only appears in person at the beginning and the end of the story, and yet... I loved how Maddocks lives in Angie's mind throughout the book. How the thought of him compels her to ferociously fight for her life so she can make the two of them as a couple a reality. Angie's dithering about his proposal early, followed by the things she did (mostly without conscious thought) that meant she was truly in love with him endeared her to me in a way she'd never been before. Finally I could see myself in Angie, and that's what I needed to embrace her as a heroine. But that was merely the cherry on top of a fabulous ice cream sundae of a psychological thriller. I had my suspicions of the villain halfway through the story, and was hard pressed not to peek at the ending to confirm. I'm glad I waited, though, because although I was right, I was also wrong. And what I got wrong was the scariest part of all. As is the norm with author Loreth Anne White's books in this decade, there are multiple villains. Evil villains, the kind you shudder over and hope and pray you never encounter in real life, because...yeah...they're evil. But truth and justice prevail in the end. Not that everything is wrapped up nicely and neatly, but enough so to give the reader hope for the future. The twists and turns of the plot, those "aha!" moments for the heroine (and the reader), are skillfully interwoven into the story with a seemingly natural ease I know isn't really easy. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is truly a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. And like Agatha Christie's and Rex Stout's books, I know I'll be re-reading this one for years to come even though I know the ending. Kudos to Ms. White for a terrific ending (ending?) to the series!
MauCarden6 More than 1 year ago
Dazzling. Just dazzling. I could end the review right there and have perfectly said all that needed to be said. But I won’t. The Girl in the Moss is dazzling in plot, characters, settings and endings. I ended my review of The Lullaby Girl mentioning Tom Petty’s song “I Won’t Back Down”. Nothing has changed for Angie. She won’t back down in trying to establish herself professionally and in her relationship with Sgt James Maddocks. She won’t back down in her determination to see justice done, even if the need for justice is from 24 years ago. None of this is easy, since Angie keeps setting up roadblocks to her own road forward in trying to do right for others. She just sometimes forgets to do right for herself. This review might seem like an essay on Angie Pallorino. It is in part because she is one of the most fascinating characters I’ve come across. In The Drowned Girls her sense of identity began to crack. In The Lullaby Girl her identity was totally destroyed. She came through a crucible of destruction and started to put herself back together after losing almost everything except for Maddocks. AKA, no, I won’t go there. Read the other books. Although Loreth Anne White does a great job of catching readers up in the third book, it would be a crying shame to not read the first two. In The Girl in the Moss, Angie and Maddocks are on a romantic fly fishing trip. While returning to the lodge where they are staying they are hailed by an old man who shows them skeletal remains partially buried in moss. The discovery of the skeleton brings home to Angie that she is no longer a cop. She is trying to become a private detective, currently working for her license under supervision of an established detective agency. This comes to a quick end for Angie after the discovery of the body. Quelle surprise! The bones are quickly identified as a woman who went missing on a fly fishing trip 24 years ago. Since Angie was present at the discovery of the skeleton, she is hired by the missing woman’s grandmother to explore what led to the woman’s death on another fly fishing trip. For a number of reasons, Maddocks is mostly MIA, my only complaint with this book. For the professional reasons Maddocks is MIA, he is busy setting up a new serious crime squad with Metro Victoria PD. He sets up a sub-squad, reviewing cold cases, consisting of the oddly charming, but still mysterious, Kjel Holgersen, and Angie’s nemesis Harvey Leo. Kjel soon discovers several cases possibly relating to a recent missing woman case. A case Angie had worked before her spectacular fall from grace. Angie asks Kjel to accompany her back to where the skeleton was found. Cue the banjo music. Cue also shocking twists leading to heartbreak and breathtaking danger. Characters, even the villains are fully dimensional, with stories and motives that matter. The twists are awful, but the trail is there. The reader may feel gobsmacked, but they won’t feel cheated. Loreth Anne White’s writing just flows, whether she is describing the local fauna in a remote Canadian forest or if she is describing the bully boys who try to intimidate Angie. There is a rhythm to the writing that just soothes then racks up the tension, stomach churning tension. This series is hard hitting, gritty crime fiction. Don’t look for much romance; but there is love: maternal love, twisted love, fraternal love, paternal love, and romantic love. Despite the wonderful darkness of this series, Angie is incandescent, her light sh
Sandy-thereadingcafe More than 1 year ago
THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is the third instalment in Loreth Anne White’s contemporary, adult ANGIE PALLORINO murder/mystery/suspense series focusing on former Vancouver Police Department sex crimes Detective Angie Pallorino, and her partner/lover Detective Sergeant James Maddocks. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS can be read as a stand alone without any difficulty. Any important information from the previous story lines is revealed where necessary but I recommend reading the series in order for cohesion especially as it pertains to our heroine’s back story. Told from several third person perspectives including Angie Pallorino THE GIRL IN THE MOSS picks up several months after THE LULLABY GIRL (#2) and finds our heroine without purpose. Fired for going rogue as a detective with the Vancouver Police Department sex crimes unit, Angie Pallorino is working towards her PI certificate but the fame of notoriety is wreaking havoc with her current job. While on vacation, Angie and her lover Detective Sergeant James Maddocks will stumble upon a shallow grave believed to be the burial place of a young woman thought missing and drowned twenty-four years earlier. A phone call from the deceased woman’s family finds our heroine back on the hunt for answers, a hunt that leads Angie to a small town of hunters, lies, and closed door secrets. What ensues is a complex investigation and the detective work of one woman, as she battles her own personal demons, and the town residents who are desperate to keep buried sins of the past. Meanwhile, Detective Sergeant James Maddocks offers up an ultimatum to the woman he loves. Unable to let go of the past, Angie struggles with the possibility of rejection including by the man that calls to her heart. James and his fellow detectives begin analysing a series of cold case files, files that will lead back to Angie’s current murder investigation. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is a mosaic of details and revelations from potential killers, to puzzling clues, clandestine lovers and secret lives. Old wounds will be opened, and families will be destroyed as one woman must come to terms with the necessity and determination to bring justice for a woman long thought buried and gone. Loreth Anne White writes with purpose; an architect of amazing talent as her story line slowly gathers the momentum towards the final reveal. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is a story of suspense and mystery; secrets and lies; violence and murder but ultimately a story of family and loss.
Sandy-thereadingcafe More than 1 year ago
THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is the third instalment in Loreth Anne White’s contemporary, adult ANGIE PALLORINO murder/mystery/suspense series focusing on former Vancouver Police Department sex crimes Detective Angie Pallorino, and her partner/lover Detective Sergeant James Maddocks. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS can be read as a stand alone without any difficulty. Any important information from the previous story lines is revealed where necessary but I recommend reading the series in order for cohesion especially as it pertains to our heroine’s back story. Told from several third person perspectives including Angie Pallorino THE GIRL IN THE MOSS picks up several months after THE LULLABY GIRL (#2) and finds our heroine without purpose. Fired for going rogue as a detective with the Vancouver Police Department sex crimes unit, Angie Pallorino is working towards her PI certificate but the fame of notoriety is wreaking havoc with her current job. While on vacation, Angie and her lover Detective Sergeant James Maddocks will stumble upon a shallow grave believed to be the burial place of a young woman thought missing and drowned twenty-four years earlier. A phone call from the deceased woman’s family finds our heroine back on the hunt for answers, a hunt that leads Angie to a small town of hunters, lies, and closed door secrets. What ensues is a complex investigation and the detective work of one woman, as she battles her own personal demons, and the town residents who are desperate to keep buried sins of the past. Meanwhile, Detective Sergeant James Maddocks offers up an ultimatum to the woman he loves. Unable to let go of the past, Angie struggles with the possibility of rejection including by the man that calls to her heart. James and his fellow detectives begin analysing a series of cold case files, files that will lead back to Angie’s current murder investigation. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is a mosaic of details and revelations from potential killers, to puzzling clues, clandestine lovers and secret lives. Old wounds will be opened, and families will be destroyed as one woman must come to terms with the necessity and determination to bring justice for a woman long thought buried and gone. Loreth Anne White writes with purpose; an architect of amazing talent as her story line slowly gathers the momentum towards the final reveal. THE GIRL IN THE MOSS is a story of suspense and mystery; secrets and lies; violence and murder but ultimately a story of family and loss.
SugarNSpice1 More than 1 year ago
There is a saying, that “nothing is consistent but change.” This is true for Angie Pallorino and she isn't dealing with it well. She lived her life for so long on the dark side – working sex crimes seeing the worst of the worst, then finally getting on the homicide team only to have her that dream yanked away from her. For so many years she dealt with her inner demons by having random sex with strangers and now that she is in a relationship with MVPD detective James Maddocks she is having a hard time adjusting to being in a committed intimate relationship. Her horrific early childhood has left her with PTSD, trust and intimacy issues. She is at a crossroads in her life and feeling insecure. Knowing the one thing she wants most in the world – being a police officer – is no longer an option she has to decide if becoming a PI will fill the void that was left after losing her job. In the previous books we mainly saw the hard side of Angie. In this book we get a look at her softer more vulnerable side but yet still mixed in with her exceptional investigative skills on ferreting out the truth. As Angie is going through a crisis of self it's fitting that the majority of this book is just Angie working on finding out what happened to a young woman 24 years ago when her missing body is discovered in a mossy grave. I can tell you any guesses as to what really happened you might have while reading Angie interviewing and investigating will not be right as the author throws one heck of a twisted ending you don't see coming. As the reader we also get to witness Angie finally finding her inner strength and esteem and this in turn helps her decide what she really wants for her future both professionally and personally in her relationship with Maddocks. Loved the final chapter of the book and can't wait to see what is next..
MusicInPrint More than 1 year ago
I READ LORETH ANNE WHITE'S BOOKS SO FAST because I cannot put them down BUT.. THEN HATE WHEN THE LAST PAGE IS TURNED!! Book Three with Angie Pallorino is as good as the first two. Would not recommend reading this one as a stand alone. Read the first one and it will hook you to read the rest. Angie has so many facets it is hard not to be absorbed by this character. She is a women with a haunting past that has made her the person who digs for the truth at every turn. Justice will heal even if the heart breaks with every turning over of the stone. The Girl in the Moss met her death 24 years ago and her skeleton discovery leads Angie on an investigation of danger and secrets. Pallorino is scrambling for purpose since she was fired from the Police Department. James Maddocks her former boss and lover is an enticement that scares her to commit. Twists, Turns, Surprises, and her old colleagues make this an amazing novel. Loved that even though the mystery seemed to be solved there was still more to come. Loved how the book ended but like I said hated when it did. "A copy of this book was provided by Montlake Romance via Netgalley with no requirements for a review. Comments here are my honest opinion." Character Kjel Holgersen is a mystery too that I hope White explains in another book.