The Lincoln Deception

The Lincoln Deception

3.8 25

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Overview

The Lincoln Deception by David O. Stewart, L.J. Ganser

In March 1900, as former Congressman John Bingham of Ohio lies dying, he begins to tell a strange tale to his physician, Dr. Jamie Fraser.

Bingham famously prosecuted eight members of John Wilkes Booth's plot to kill Lincoln. But during the 1865 trial, conspirator Mary Surratt divulged a secret so explosive it could shatter the republic. Though Bingham takes the secret to his grave, Fraser cannot let go of the mystery. Bored with small-town medical practice, he begins to investigate, securing an unlikely ally in Speed Cook, a black, college-educated professional ballplayer and would-be newspaper publisher. Cook is fascinated by Fraser's inquiry and, like Fraser, thinks the accepted version of Lincoln's assassination rings false. Was Booth truly the mastermind or were other, more powerful forces pulling the strings?

From Maryland to New York City, from Indiana to Washington, Fraser and Cook track down key figures and witnesses-including Mary Surratt's neurotic daughter Anna, Booth's nephew, actor Creston Clarke, and Clarke's attractive business manager, Mrs. Eliza Scott. Piece by piece the truth emerges—separating fact from rumor, innocent from guilty, and revealing a story of greed, ambition, courage, and tragedy.

Blending real and fictional characters, The Lincoln Deception is a superbly researched, brilliantly plotted and thoroughly gripping mystery that explores one of the nation's darkest and most fascinating eras and the conspiracy that changed world history.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781480590113
Publisher: Brilliance Audio
Publication date: 08/05/2014
Edition description: Unabridged
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 6.75(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

A former attorney, David O. Stewart is the author of The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, which won the Washington Writing Award as Best Book of 2007, Impeached: The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln’s Legacy, and American Emperor, Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. He lives in Maryland and his website is at www.davidostewart.com.

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The Lincoln Deception 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
M_DeStefano More than 1 year ago
You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction books from which he enriched our understanding of the United States Constitution and how it was created, from the point of view of those 55 men who created it in that, Summer of 1787. He also delved into the question of why a president, who simply fired his Secretary of War, was Impeached and nearly convicted in the Senate for doing so. And in his latest offering, he treats us to an investigative and most perplexing portrait of a sitting vice president who killed our nation’s first Treasury Secretary in 1804. But it was the author’s treatment of Aaron Burr’s frightening political vision, in stark contrast to what the founders fought for, that makes American Emperor such a compelling and thought-provoking read. It’s instructive to realize that some authors have trouble making the transition from one writing style (in this case, non-fiction) to another (fiction), but not this author. In his debut performance as a fiction writer, David O. Stewart proves once again that his prowess as a page-turning author and storyteller has not wavered one iota from his non-fiction offerings. In The Lincoln Deception, Mr. Stewart takes a factual event—the dying utterance of John Bingham, the man who prosecuted the Lincoln conspirators—and spins it into a period yarn that is an historic eye opener. He successfully crafted each chapter that compels the reader on, the sign of a great suspense writer. And something more esoteric that can easily be missed by anyone who reads a period work; Mr. Stewart very specifically captured the flavor of race relations in turn-of-the-century 1900 America with regard to the Jim Crow laws and how our protagonists (one white male and one black male) were treated by other characters as well as how they reacted to each other. Yet another triumph for Mr. Stewart that should find its way into the classroom!
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Samantha Rivera for Readers' Favorite The assassination of Abraham Lincoln is one of the biggest pieces of the history of the United States. Not only was it an important event when it occurred, but in 1900, when this story takes place, it is still near the front of many people’s minds. No one ever found out for sure why the assassination took place or who was pulling the strings but Dr. Fraser and Speed Cook are determined to do just that. They aren’t willing to let history be written without all of the necessary facts, which means a little digging and danger of their own. That’s because in The Lincoln Deception some people have too much to lose to let the secrets come out. This story follows two men as they try to figure out exactly how and why President Lincoln was assassinated. It’s intriguing the way this story develops from one man’s deathbed confession into a huge quest that they can’t seem to walk away from, no matter how dangerous it gets. Stewart took an event that was perhaps one of the biggest mysteries in history and turned it into an even bigger one. This story is steeped in enough historical facts that you’ll be amazed by what you learn and, of course, amazed by the great way it all plays out in the end. You’ll learn things you never knew about the history of America and the people who helped on both sides of the Civil War. It’s never too late to learn the truth in The Lincoln Deception.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The plot to kill lincoln had to involve greater political will then just the known conspirators. This is a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good book for those who like historical fiction. It gives a number of interesting theories.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed this thoroughly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entertaining and interesting look at the Lincoln assassination as a coup d'etat of mixed Northern and Southern business and military leaders in 1865.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It felt as though I was walking those streets, ducking out of sight and enjoying the adventure for truth.
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reader75LL More than 1 year ago
This was an interesting read of historical fiction. Check it out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book for the first couple of pages was a good read. Not overly thrilling, though it may improve.
BarringtonAl More than 1 year ago
This is a fun historical novel with a lot of info.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read for history buffs. From one grain of factual data, Stewart spins a believable yarn of possibilities.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed this book a lot of different elements involved given the period. 2 men different backgrounds able to be friends
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story is very interesting and quite plausable. Did Boothe act alone? Could one man commit, plan and finance such an elaborate coup d' esta? The deathbed statement by an active participent who was there needed to be explored even if it was a fictional romp through history. Good story and amust read for Licoln followers and conspiracy zealots
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool thats interesting
barb1740 More than 1 year ago
The author is no doubt a fine historian, but this novel demonstrates that he lacks skill of a story teller.  I am fewer than 50 pages from the end, but I'm throwing in the towel.  A fundamental of good storytelling is "show us what we need to know."  Far too much time is spent on filling us in about historical events and relationships.  Alternate theories of Lincoln'S assignation are told to us, not developed. The pedantic is sprinkled with various attacks against our heroes, but these do no move the plot. The Noel might be somewhat more engaging for those who are fans of conspiracy theories or Mr. Stewart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Y