Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls: A Handbook for Unapologetic Living

Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls: A Handbook for Unapologetic Living

by Jes Baker

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781580055826
Publisher: Da Capo Press
Publication date: 10/27/2015
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 131,641
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Jes Baker is a positive, progressive, and magnificently irreverent force to be reckoned with in the realm of self-love advocacy and mental health.

Jes is internationally recognized for her writing on her blog, The Militant Baker, and for the “Attractive and Fat” campaign, a response to Abercrombie and Fitch’s controversial branding efforts. Her extensive body advocacy work has continued to garner attention from hundreds of national and international media networks.

When not blogging, Jes spends her time producing the renowned Body Love Conference, speaking at universities, taking pictures in her underwear, writing for several online publications, working with clothing companies to promote more plus size fashion, and trying to convince her cats that they like to wear sweaters and bow ties. Learn more about Jes at TheMilitantBaker.com.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

1 What, in the World Is Body Lore, and Why Does It Matter? 9

2 Start Now, GODDAMNIT: Wailing Doesn't Work 18

Guest essay Virgie Tovar 25

3 You Hate Your Body Because Don Draper Told You To: Throw Some Shade at History 28

Guest essay Sonya Renee Taylor 43

4 If You're Happy and You Know It, Cut in Line: Fat Hate Isn't Your Problem 47

Guest essay Andrew Walen 61

5 Fat and Health: Rethink That Shit 64

Guest essay Jen McLellan 82

6 Selfies Aren't Selfish: Narcissism Is Good for You 86

7 Change Your Tumblr, Change Your Life: Diversify Your Media Feed 105

Guest essay Shanna Katz Kattari 116

8 100% of Humans Have Brains: Mental Health Support Is for Everyone 121

Guest essay Kimberly A. Peace, MSW 140

9 Watch Your Language: Words Mailer 144

Guest essay Sam Dylan Finch 166

10 "Fatshion" Is a Form of Political Resistance: Wear What Scares You 170

Guest essay Bruce Sturgell 187

11 Affirmations Aren't Just for People Who Love Sedona: You Can Rewire Your Brain 190

12 Fat Girls Find Love Too: Yes, That Includes You 197

Guest essay Chrystal Bougon 213

13 Loving Your Body Will Change the World 217

Resources 223

Notes 232

Acknowledgments 241

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Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls: A Handbook for Unapologetic Living 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Laura_at_125Pages More than 1 year ago
4.25 Stars Original review at 125pages I received this book for free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. All the yesses to this book! Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls is subtitled A Handbook for Unapologetic Living and it so is. I think I have visited Jes Baker’s website The Militant Baker once, during the Abercrombie & Fitch debacle (short story their CEO was an asshat and Jess called him out on it), so I was not aware of who she was when I requested or read this book. Now I know a few things about her – 1) we live in the same city (Tucson, 520 is where it’s at y’all) and 2) she is fantastic. I wasn’t sure what kind of book I was getting into but I was intrigued. So it made me ridiculously happy that Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls is more that just for the aforementioned ladies. She promotes body positivity for all; fat, skinny, black, white, LGBTQIA and everyone in between. And that is fantastic. Yes, she is unapologetic about being fat, and yes she thinks people who body shame are just the worst, but that’s the truth, and you have to admire someone who is willing to put themselves out there so publicly to rally around a population that generally hides in the shadows. I also loved that she is so inclusive, no matter your size. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has ever felt body shame and anyone who is the parent of a girl. The section on positive affirmations is worth the price of the book alone. Favorite lines – “We’re taught to deflect compliments, to publicly berate ourselves, and that verbal flogging is a sign of a good human being. It’s not. Having the nerve to say, “God, I’m feeling so wonderful about myself today!” is a fantastic thing, and if it makes people feel uncomfortable (it might) it’s because they haven’t figured out that form of liberation yet. Their loss.”
dualpicks More than 1 year ago
I was a very large man. I didn't feel loved, I didn't see the value in my life. As a part of the effort to change these things for myself I lost lots of weight and have since kept it off. As I understand it I am well within the silly BMI thing. I was hoping I'd look a little different with the weight off. Really, I suppose, I still hated my body. Before making any other changes, I saw that what needed to change was my state of mind about the changes I'd been making. The way I was beginning to love myself was proof enough. I had recently followed Tess Holliday and had, this way, come to know about Jess Baker's book. I ordered it. Reading this book, showed me different perspectives of a world that worked as I suspected, mainly catered to exploit people with the problem I have for monetary gain and to push an outdated societal norm. All the lack of self love I saw in people and subsequently myself I saw in a broader overarching context and I gained a better vocabulary for speaking on it via Jess's book. Jess, in a playful and flavored nonsense kind of voice, lays out different angles as to why people are "fat," instead of fat and how this has come to reverberate across our society in the way that it has. throughout the chapters and in guess essays, she illustrates the angles, history, and current state of what we have come to know as fat people and how that affects our ability to love ourselves. Especially Women. Jess successfully avoids the inside the ivy league baseball jargon that can drag a subject like this into eating the veggies with the dinner drudgery. Sources are cited and indexed, the book is formatted in a way that makes it easy to reference and check out different bloggers, documentaries and various sources for you to look up on your own. There are many call to actions to practice what she is preaching. Really this is all about loving yourself through self acceptance. A lot of us need a break down to see that. In our day and age, especially the fat woman. Jess breaks it down, for her and for him. I recommend this book to anyone.