Traditional Irish Fairy Tales

Traditional Irish Fairy Tales

by James Stephens

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Overview

Ten illustrated, time-honored tales—brimming with enchantment, whimsy and sly humor—offer hours of reading pleasure: 'The Birth of Bran,' 'The Little Brawl at Allen,' 'The Enchanted Cave of Cesh Corran,' 'Becuma of the White Skin,' 'Mongan's Frenzy,' and five others.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781492223696
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 08/22/2013
Pages: 148
Sales rank: 940,811
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.32(d)

About the Author

James Stephens (1882-1950) was an Irish novelist and poet. James Stephens wrote many retellings of Irish myths and fairy tales. His retellings are marked by a rare combination of humor and lyricism (Deirdre, and Irish Fairy Tales are often singled out for praise). He also wrote several books (Crock of Gold, Etched in Moonlight, Demi-Gods) which are fiction, but loosely based on Irish fairy tales. "Crock of Gold," in particular, achieved enduring popularity, and was frequently reprinted throughout the author's lifetime. Stephens began his career as a poet under the tutelage of "Æ" (George William Russell); his first book of poems, "Insurrections," was published in 1909. His last book, "Kings and the Moon" (1938), was also a volume of verse. In the 1930's Stephens had some acquaintance with James Joyce, who found that they shared a birth year (and, Joyce mistakenly believed, a birthday). Joyce, who was concerned with his ability to finish what would later become Finnegans Wake, proposed at one point that Stephens assist him, with the authorship credited to JJ & S (James Joyce & Stephens, also a pun for the popular Irish whiskey made by John Jameson & Sons). The plan, however, never came to fruition, as Joyce was able to complete the work on his own. In the last decade of his life, Stephens found a new audience through a series of broadcasts on the BBC.

Table of Contents

THE STORY OF TUAN MAC CAIRILL
THE BOYHOOD OF FIONN
THE BIRTH OF BRAN
OISÍN'S MOTHER
THE WOOING OF BECFOLA
THE LITTLE BRAWL AT ALLEN
THE CARL OF THE DRAB COAT
THE ENCHANTED CAVE OF CESH CORRAN
BECUMA OF THE WHITE SKIN
MONGAN'S FRENZY

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Traditional Irish Fairy Tales 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
fiverivers on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is one of those books you should read simply to expand your knowledge of Irish heritage and culture. A fascinating insight into historical standards in society, particularly women's roles, as well as a broader world view and belief system.
bzedan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
There's really not a lot to dislike about Irish fairy tales. The ones in this book run more the lines of kings and warriors and their interactions with the magic world.