The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

You thought you knew the story of the “The Three Little Pigs”… You thought wrong.
 
In this hysterical and clever fracture fairy tale picture book that twists point of view and perspective, young readers will finally hear the other side of the story of “The Three Little Pigs.”
 
“In this humorous story, Alexander T. Wolf tells his own outlandish version of what really happens during his encounter with the three pigs…. Smith's simplistic and wacky illustrations add to the effectiveness of this fractured fairy tale.”
Children’s Literature
 
“Older kids (and adults) will find very funny.”
School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140544510
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 03/01/1996
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 9,550
Product dimensions: 8.20(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile: AD510L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Multiple award-winning author Jon Scieszka grew up in Flint, Michigan, the second oldest and the nicest of six boys. Jon went to school at Culver Military Academy in Indiana where he was a Lieutenant; Albion College in Michigan where he studied to be a doctor; and Columbia University in New York, where he received an M.F.A. in fiction. He taught elementary school in New York for ten years in a variety of positions. He is the author of many boks for children including the New York Times Best Illustrated Book The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (illustrated by Lane Smith), the Caldecott Honor book The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (illustrated by Lane Smith), and Math Curse (illustrated by Lane Smith).  In addition to his work as an author, Jon also runs a web-based literacy program called “Guys Read” that is designed to encourage boys, particularly reluctant readers, to get involved with books. In 2008, Jon was named the country’s first National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, a joint effort of the Library of Congress and the Children’s Book Council. During his two-year role as Ambassador, he acted as a spokesperson for children’s literature, speaking to groups of parents, teachers, and children to encourage the importance of reading. You can visit Jon online at www. jsworldwide.com.
 
Lane Smith’s illustrations have appeared in many publications including, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The Boston Globe, Sierra, American Bookseller, The Progressive, Time, Newsweek, Mother Jones, and Ms. He is the illustrator of James and the Giant Peach (by Roald Dahl), the New York Times Best Illustrated Book The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (by Jon Scieszka), and the Caldecott Honor book The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (by Jon Scieszka). He is also the author/illustrator of It’s a Book, John, Paul, George & Ben, and Grandpa Green. You can visit him online at www. lanesmithbooks.com.

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True Story of the Three Little Pigs 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 100 reviews.
GaGaTX More than 1 year ago
This gives a definite new twist to the Three Little Pigs, and lets everyone know that there are always two sides to every story, regardless. It is all in the perception - and of course who is telling the story. Great for kids, and fun for adults to read to them. I have given this book as a gift on many occasions.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a cute story and very interesting reading the other side of the story! My children loved it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A humorous version of what the wolf was thinking when he came upon the 3 pigs. A quick and funny read for young ones.
cjfox73 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Hilarious and irreverent, reminiscent of Stinky Cheese Man, this story will have kids (and grown ups) in stitches. The illustrations are amazing.
Nikkles on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A wonderful children's book! The illustrations are great and its good for kids to see that there are two sides to every story. This is just a really funny book, even if your an adult. I'd suggest that you read anything by Jon Scieszka!
alcrivello on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of the three little pigs told by the wolf, and let me tell you, he has some things to say about those pigs!
eviltammy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of the three little pigs - from the wolf's point of view. Hysterical.
mwflood on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I could totally relate to the wolf in this story. Perception has gotten us in a spot at one time or another and this really is a great way to show children to see a situation from multiple angles. A great title when teaching children about postmodern literature and when want to teach kids the importance of context and perspective or seeing things from the other person's point of view.
mrsarey on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the wolf's version of the 3 little pigs- very funny!
PuffyBear on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is really really good. It tells the story of the Three Little pigs from the Wolf's side. A must read book. Really really good. The wolf keeps saying that he was innocent.
peterjawilson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a well written and awesome retelling of the 3 Little Pigs; the REAL events of that fateful day. I always had my suspicions about the wolf's guilt...nice to see my thoughts on the matter thus corroborated.
sunnysturdivant on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Summary: The wolf was baking a cake for his granny when he realized that he needed a cup of sugar. All three of the wolfs neighbors were pigs. The wolf had a terrible cold, and the little pigs houses were not built very stable. When the wolf approached the houses he sneezed and blew them down. To make the story more exciting journalists made up that the ¿big bad wolf¿ huffed and puffed until he blew their houses down.Personal reaction: I think this book was a great twist to the original story of ¿the three little pigs.¿ I think that the kids would enjoy the story from the wolf¿s point of view. The illustrations in this book are also very good. Classroom Extension: As a class we can read both versions of ¿the three little pigs¿ then we can discuss which version we like better.(2) We can do a little play in our room of the ¿three little pigs¿ students can take turns being the wolf and the pigs.
Calamia on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The True Story of the Three Little PIgs is a story from the Wolf's side. The wolf tells his story of how he is innocent and he was framed. He did not blow down their houses, instead he just had bad cold and sneezed. The wolf also finds it assuming that the pigs built such flimsy houses. This is a funny story for children and it also reminds them that their is always two sides of a story. Readers will begin to question the story form the three little pigs after they hear the wolf's side of the story because he is very convincing. The illustations in the book are also great because it looks like a story from a newspaper.
Stephanyk on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is appropriate for the grades pre-k through fourth. Younger children would probably enjoy having this story read to them because it is a twist of the original three little pigs. Alexander T. Wolf tells his side of the story in jail of what happened with the three pigs. He makes the readers think that the pigs are cruel and dumb. He says that he is innocent and that the news reporter made him out to be the big bad wolf for a good story. - I would ask the students to choose which side of the story they believe, the three little pigs or the big bad wolf. Then I would have them split up into two groups. If there are students who cannot choose a side, I would make them the judges. I would have students put on a trial. - I would teach the children about point of view and how the narrator cannot always be trusted.
SarahClick on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Summary:The True Story of the Three Little Pigs is telling the wolfs side of the story. He says that he didn't huff and puff to blow their houses down he merely had a cold and needed a cup of sugar to finish a birthday cake for his grandma. He accidentally blew down the first two pigs houses and ate them because he couldnt let them go to waste. The third pigs house was very strong and he was very rude. When the cops came to the third pigs house the wolf was sneezing and since he had ate two other pigs they painted him as a big bad wolf.Personal Reaction:I think this is a cute story and I remember reading it in school. I think its nice how they can take an old story and make it new by a new take on the story. However I still believe the first story of the three little pigs. :)Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Teach a segment on bullying2. Teach that there are always two sides to every story3. Can act it out as a class
Khoffy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Such a creative and interesting twist on the old story of the Three Little Pigs. It allows the 'Big Bad' Wolf to tell his side of the story, a friendly neighbor looking for a cup of sugar and just happens to eat the pigs. It's a fun story to read to children, especially if they are familiar with the original story.
JusticeEvans on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Longish and hilarious re-telling of the classic three little pigs story with a Scieszka style humorous change in direction.Great for funny read aloud and for comparison to the known tale and ways we can change familiar stories.
ryann0423 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is fun story the "true" story of the 3 little pigs. The illustrations in this story are very unique and not typical for a 3 little pigs story. The story is told from the wolf's point of view giving a known story totally new.The wolf is just trying to explain why he is a good wolf, not a big bad wolf. He is simply making a cake and needs to borrow some sugar and he simply was sick and sneezed blowing each pigs house over. This story is great for read aloud because the voices would be fun for the kids to hear. It can also show kids there are always two sides to a story and you may not really know the "true" story.
McKennaMiller on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was one of my favorite books growing up. I remember being able to recite this with out reading it! What is so great about this version is the humor. It has so much voice and personality, especially shown through the wolf.
KimSmyth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
a very funny fractured fairy tale that both you and your kids will enjoy!
AllisonHood on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book because it was different from the one that I grew up hearing. The wolf was baking a cake for his granny and needed some sugar, so, he went to the piggy's house to borrow some. I don¿t like that two of the pigs die.
dawnfires on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Summary:This book is from the "big bad wolf" side of the story. The wolf tries to convince you that he knows the real story of the 3 Little Pigs and wants to share he version of what happened or at least he tries to explain that he was framed by the 3 little pigs. The Wolf continues to explain he was trying to help his poor little grandmother bake a cake and needed to borrow some sugar. When he got to the first and second pigs house, he had some sneezing attacks start, but he recalls that no huffing and puffing was going on. Personal Reaction:I remember reading this book for the first time, and I still can't get enough of this wonderful collaboration of The Three Little Pigs. I love the wolfs side of the story, I think he gives a great argument for the reader to understand.Classroom Extension Ideas: 1. This book would be great to read after you introduced your class to The 3 Little Pigs during the week of fairy tales or traditional literature books. 2. i like the ideal that the kids could play with puppets and retell the story, or they could make their puppets themselves for an art project that week.
laurakurtz on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In this fun and modern three little pigs tale,Alexander T Wolf tells the author his side of the story: it was all a big misunderstanding. As he tells it, he was baking a cake for granny and needed to borrow something, and had a bad cold. He accidentally blew their houses down, and then once they had died it was just an innocent snack! The sketch illustrations are interesting and quirky and appealing. Its a fun update.
jmvarnad on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love this book. The True Story of the 3 Little gives the wolf side of the story. All Mr. Wolf was trying to do was get a cup of sugar for his cake, but sadly his allergies got in the way. I would love to read this to a group of students one day.
Kandie1208 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This story is the classic story of the three little pigs but the wolf's side of the story. While making a cake for his granny, he ran out of sugar. He also had a terrible sneeze! So he went to his neighbor's house to ask for a cup of sugar. He accidently sneezed the first two little pigs houses down, and found them dead. He didn't want to waste perfectly good hams, so he ate them. He then went to the last little pigs house and the pig was very rude. As he was sneezing and trying to get into the house to confront the little pig, the cops drove by and arrested him. The wolf claims that the cops made him out to be a big bad wolf.I love the wolf's side of the story. It's a classic story with a twist. Who do you believe, the little pigs, or the wolf?This would be a good lesson on getting both sides of the story. A great activity would be to have the kids sit in a circle and have the teacher whisper something into the first child's ear. When that child passes it on to the next and so forth. The last child says the pharse out loud, and they can see if it has change though out the circle. Teaching kids that the story can change. Another good activity would be for the teacher to bring in a piece of straw, a stick, and a brick. Have the children try blowing on them to see which ones move and which ones don't.