Understanding Agent Systems

Understanding Agent Systems

Hardcover

$35.70 $39.95 Save 11% Current price is $35.7, Original price is $39.95. You Save 11%.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783540419754
Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
Publication date: 01/28/2001
Series: Series on Agent Technology
Pages: 208
Product dimensions: 6.35(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Mark d’Inverno has been working in the field of agent-based systems for well over 10 years and is currently Professor of Computer Science in the Cavendish School of Computer Science at the University of Westminster. He gained a BA in Mathematics in 1986 and an MSc in Computation in 1988 both from Oxford University, and in 1998 was awarded a PhD from University College London. He has published numerous papers in the area and is an expert in formal sepcification of agent systems. Prof d’Inverno is a founder of the UKMAS workshops, has chaired two UKMAS wortkshops and is a member of the UKMAS Steering Committee. He sits on several conference and workshop programme committees.

Michael Luck is a Senior Lecturer in the Intelligence, Agents and Multimedia Group in the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton, UK. He has worked in the field of agent technology and multi-agent systems for over ten years, having previously led the Agent-Based Systems Group at the University of Warwick for seven years, and having gained his PhD from University College London in 1993 for work on agent-based discovery. Dr Luck is a co-founder of the UK Special Interest Group on Multi-Agent Systems, and currently Chair of the UKMAS Steering Committee. He is a member of the Advisory Boards of FIPA (the agent standards body), MAAMAW (the European agent conference) and CEEMAS (the Central and Eastern European agent conference). He has served on numerous programme committees for agent conferences and workshops, and has organised and chaired several international conferences in the area of agents, including those for industry. Dr Luck has contributed to policy making forums for national and European agencies, has reviewed proposals for many national and international funding agencies, and has published extensively in this area (with over 75 papers and 5 books). Since 2000, he has been Director of AgentLink, the European Network of Excellence for Agent-Based Computing.

Table of Contents

1.The Agent Landscape1
1.1Introduction1
1.2Agents2
1.2.1Terminology2
1.2.2Problems with Definition4
1.3Multi-Agent Systems6
1.4Desiderata for a Conceptual View of Agents7
1.5A Formal Framework for Agent Definition and Development8
1.5.1Formal Frameworks8
1.5.2Notation9
1.5.3Specification Structure Diagrams11
2.The SMART Agent Framework15
2.1Introduction15
2.2Initial Concepts15
2.3Entities19
2.3.1Entity State20
2.3.2Entity Operations20
2.3.3Object State21
2.3.4Object Operations21
2.4Agents22
2.4.1Introduction22
2.4.2Agent Specification23
2.4.3Agent Perception24
2.4.4Agent Action25
2.4.5Agent State26
2.4.6Agent Operations27
2.5Autonomy28
2.5.1Introduction28
2.5.2Autonomous Agent Specification29
2.5.3Autonomous Agent Perception30
2.5.4Autonomous Agent Action30
2.5.5Autonomous Agent State30
2.5.6Autonomous Agent Operations31
2.6Applying SMART: Tropistic Agents31
2.6.1Tropistic Agents31
2.6.2Reformulating Perception32
2.6.3Reformulating Action33
2.6.4Discussion33
2.7Specification Structure of SMART34
2.8Related Work35
2.9Summary38
3.Agent Relationships39
3.1Introduction39
3.2Multi-Agent Systems40
3.2.1Multi-Agent System Definition40
3.2.2Server-Agents and Neutral-Objects40
3.2.3Multi-Agent System Specification41
3.3Goal Generation42
3.3.1Discussion42
3.3.2Goal Generation Specification43
3.4Goal Adoption45
3.4.1Goal Adoption by Neutral-Objects46
3.4.2Goal Adoption by Server-Agents48
3.4.3Autonomous Goal Adoption49
3.4.4Autonomous Goal Destruction50
3.5Engagement51
3.5.1Direct Engagement51
3.5.2Direct Engagements in a Multi-Agent System53
3.5.3Engagement Chains53
3.5.4Engagement Chains in a Multi-Agent System55
3.6Cooperation56
3.6.1Cooperations in a Multi-Agent System57
3.6.2Discussion and Example58
3.7The Agent Society59
3.8Agent Relationships Taxonomy61
3.8.1Direct Engagement Relation61
3.8.2Generic Engagement Relation61
3.8.3Indirect Engagement Relation62
3.8.4Generic Ownership Relation63
3.8.5Direct Ownership Relation63
3.8.6Unique Ownership Relation64
3.8.7Specific Ownership Relation64
3.8.8Generic Cooperation Relation65
3.9Summary66
4.An Operational Analysis of Agent Relationships69
4.1Introduction69
4.2Initial Concepts70
4.3Making Engagements72
4.4Breaking Engagements77
4.5Joining Cooperations79
4.6Leaving Cooperations81
4.7An Illustrative Example84
4.8Summary89
5.Sociological Agents91
5.1Introduction91
5.2Agent Store92
5.2.1Applying SMART: Hysteretic Agents96
5.2.2Applying SMART: Knowledge-Based Agents97
5.3Agent Models99
5.3.1Entity Models99
5.3.2Sociological Agents100
5.3.3Modelling the Motivations of Others104
5.3.4Modelling the Models of Others106
5.4Agent Plans108
5.4.1Introduction108
5.4.2Plan-Agents108
5.4.3Multi-Agent Plans110
5.4.4Multi-Agent Plan-Agents114
5.4.5Sociological Plan-Agents115
5.4.6An Illustrative Example118
5.4.7Modelling the Plans of Others122
5.5Summary123
6.The Contract Net as a Goal Directed System125
6.1Introduction125
6.2Contract Net Protocol125
6.3Contract Net Components127
6.3.1Nodes127
6.3.2Agents127
6.3.3Monitor Agents128
6.3.4Idle Nodes128
6.3.5Server-Agents128
6.4Contract Net Relationships129
6.5Contract Net State132
6.5.1Task Announcements132
6.5.2Bids132
6.5.3System State133
6.6Contract Net Protocol133
6.6.1Axiomatic Definitions133
6.6.2Making Task Announcements134
6.6.3Making Bids135
6.6.4Awarding Contracts136
6.6.5Terminating Contracts137
6.7Summary138
7.Computational Architecture for BDI Agents141
7.1Introduction141
7.2AgentSpeak(L)141
7.3Types142
7.3.1Beliefs143
7.3.2Events143
7.3.3Plans144
7.3.4Intentions145
7.4AgentSpeak(L) Agents145
7.5AgentSpeak(L) Agent Operation146
7.6Summary151
8.Evaluating Social Dependence Networks153
8.1Introduction153
8.2Social Dependence Networks153
8.2.1Action and Resource Autonomy155
8.2.2Dependence Relations155
8.2.3Dependence Situations155
8.3External Descriptions155
8.3.1Introduction155
8.3.2SDN in SMART156
8.3.3Formalising External Descriptions158
8.4Action and Resource Autonomy159
8.5Dependence Relations161
8.6Dependence Situations164
8.7Summary166
9.Conclusions169
9.1Summary169
9.1.1The SMART Framework169
9.1.2Agent Relationships169
9.1.3Agent Architectures170
9.2Evaluation170
9.2.1Generality171
9.2.2Application171
9.3Concluding Remarks172
A.The Z Specification Language173
A.1Introduction to Z173
A.2Generic Z Definitions177
A.2.1Sets177
A.2.2Relations178
A.2.3Functions179
A.2.4Sequences180
References181
Index189

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews