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We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea
     

We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea

5.0 2
by Arthur Ransome
 

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In this latest adventure (following Pigeon Post, winner of the Carnegie Medal), the Walker family has come to Harwich to wait for Commander Walker’s return. As usual, the children can’t stay away from boats, and this time they meet young Jim Brading, skipper of the well-found sloop Goblin. But fun turns to high drama when the anchor drags, and the four

Overview

In this latest adventure (following Pigeon Post, winner of the Carnegie Medal), the Walker family has come to Harwich to wait for Commander Walker’s return. As usual, the children can’t stay away from boats, and this time they meet young Jim Brading, skipper of the well-found sloop Goblin. But fun turns to high drama when the anchor drags, and the four young sailors find themselves drifting out to sea – sweeping across to Holland in the midst of a full gale! As in all of Ransome’s books, the emphasis is on self reliance, courage, and resourcefulness. We Didn’t Mean to Go to Sea is a story to warm any mariner’s heart. Full of nautical lore and adventure, it will appeal to young armchair sailors and seasoned salts alike.

“The seventh of the Arthur Ransome books, and I really think it is the best.” –Sunday Times

“Perhaps the best of all . . . Told with all the wealth of practical detail and satisfying sense of reality which make Mr. Ransome so unfailingly successful.” –Punch

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781567924879
Publisher:
Godine, David R. Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
05/28/2014
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
333
Sales rank:
703,512
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.14(h) x 0.82(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Arthur Ransome was born in 1884. He was in Russia in 1917 and witnessed the Revolution, which he reported for the Manchester Guardian. After escaping to Scandinavia, he settled in the Lake District of England with his Russian wife where, in 1929, he wrote Swallows and Amazons. Thus began a writing career that has produced some of the best children s literature of all time.

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We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After many years of reading all of the Swallows & Amazons books, I have come to regard this story as my favorite. It has many elements that set it apart from the rest of the series. It is the only story that features the Swallows, alone, without any of the other children appearing. Through a series of mishaps, the four Walker children end up drifting out into the North Sea on a small cutter (which does not belong to them), in the fog, with night approaching. Then, a storm forces them to sail further and further out to sea. This may be the only "real" story in the series in which the children are genuinely in peril of their lives, with no adults around to help. How the Swallows come to terms with their situation, and overcome the challenges to survive, makes this the most inspirational story in the series. There is also an unexpected and lengthy appearance by Ted Walker, the father of the Swallows, who looms so large in their lives, but who has previously been mostly absent from the narrative. Parents of younger readers may want to enjoy this book together with their children, because the events could be quite frightening.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this story when I was 10 years old and I read it to my children. We all love the Walker family and their adventures. They are truly real life stories. Even though the story was written over 50 years ago, the plot appeals to the spirit of adventure that lies within all of us. For children and preteens, it captures that desire to be free from grown-up supervision, but does so in a way that makes it seem real and plausible. A first rate summer read!!!