White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America

White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America

by Nancy Isenberg

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143129677
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/04/2017
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 496
Sales rank: 46,797
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Nancy Isenberg is the author of Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr, which was a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize in Biography and won the Oklahoma Book Award for best book in Nonfiction. She is the coauthor, with Andrew Burstein, of Madison and Jefferson. She is the T. Harry Williams Professor of American History at LSU, and writes regularly for Salon.com. Isenberg is the winner of the 2016 Walter & Lillian Lowenfels Criticism Award from the Before Columbus Foundation and was #4 on the 2016 Politico 50 list. She lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Charlottesville, Virginia.

Read an Excerpt

Clinton’s embarrassing second term didn’t seem to provide lessons, insofar as the Republicans plunged ahead with their own (effectively) white trash candidate in 2008, Alaska governor Sarah Palin. The devastatingly direct Frank Rich of the New York Times referred to the Republican ticket as “Palin and McCain’s Shotgun Marriage.” Did the venerable John McCain of Arizona, ordinarily a savvy politician, have a lapse in judgment here? Slate produced an online video of Palin’s hometown of Wasilla, painting it as a forgettable wasteland, a place “to get gas and pee” before getting back on the road. Wasilla was elsewhere described as the “punch line for most redneck jokes told in Anchorage.” Erica Jong wrote in the Huffington Post, “White trash America certainly has allure for voters,” which explains the photoshopped image of Palin that appeared on the Internet days after her nomination. In a stars-and-stripes bikini, holding an assault rifle and wearing her signature black-rimmed glasses, Palin was one-half hockey mom and one-half hot militia babe.
 
News of the pregnancy of Palin’s teenage daughter Bristol led to a shotgun engagement to Levi Johnston, which was arranged in time for the Republican National Convention. Us Weekly featured Palin on the cover, with the provocative title, “Babies, Lies, and Scandal.” Maureen Dowd compared Palin to Eliza Doolittle of My Fair Lady fame, in getting prepped for her first off-script television interview. Could there be any more direct allusion to her questionable class origins? The Palin melodrama led one journalist to associate the Alaska clan with the plot of a Lifetime television feature. The joke was proven true to life two years later, when the backwoods candidate gave up her gig as governor and starred in her own reality TV show, titled Sarah Palin’s Alaska.
 
Palin’s candidacy was a remarkable event on all accounts. She was only the second female of any kind and the first female redneck to appear on a presidential ticket. John McCain’s advisers admitted that she had been selected purely for image purposes, and they joined the chorus trashing the flawed candidate after Obama’s historic victory. Leaks triggered a media firestorm over Palin’s wardrobe expense account. An angry aide categorized the Palins’ shopping spree as “Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from coast to coast.”
 
The Alaskan made an easy and attractive target. Journalists were flabbergasted when she showed no shame in displaying astounding lapses in knowledge. Her bungled interview with NBC host Katie Couric represented more than gotcha journalism: Palin didn’t just misconstrue facts; she came across as a woman who was unable to articulate a single complex idea. (The old cracker slur as “idle-headed” seemed to fit.) But neither did Andrew Jackson run as an “idea man” in an earlier century, and it was his style of backcountry hubris that McCain’s staffers had been hoping to revive. Shooting wolves from a small plane, bragging about her love of moose meat, “Sarah from Alaska” positioned herself as a regular Annie Oakley on the campaign trail.
 
It was not enough to rescue her from the mainstream (what she self-protectively called “lamestream”) media. Sarah Palin did not have a self-made woman’s résumé. She could not offset the “white trash” label as the Rhodes Scholar Bill Clinton could. She had attended six unremarkable colleges. She had no military experience (à la navy veteran Jimmy Carter), though she did send one son off to Iraq. Writing in the New Yorker, Sam Tanenhaus was struck by Palin’s self-satisfied manner: “the certitude of being herself, in whatever unfinished condition, will always be good enough.”
 
Maureen Dowd quipped that Palin was a “country-music queen without the music.” She lacked the self-deprecating humor of Dolly Parton—not to mention the natural talent. The real conundrum was why, even more than how, she was chosen: the white trash Barbie was at once visually appealing and disruptive, and she came from a state whose motto on license plates read, “The Last Frontier.” The job was to package the roguish side of Palin alongside a comfortable, conventional female script. In the hit country single “Redneck Woman” (2004), Gretchen Wilson rejected Barbie as an unreal middle-class symbol—candidate Palin’s wardrobe bingeing was her Barbie moment.
 
Her Eliza Doolittle grand entrance came during the televised debate with Senator Joe Biden of Delaware. As the nation waited to see what she looked like and how she performed, Palin came onstage in a little black dress, wearing heels and pearls, and winked at the camera. From the neck down she looked like a Washington socialite, but the wink faintly suggested a gum-chewing waitress at a small-town diner. Embodying these two extremes, the fetching hockey mom image ultimately lost out to what McCain staffers identified as both “hillbilly” and “prima donna.”
 
Sex formed a meaningful subtext throughout Palin’s time of national exposure. In terms of trash talk, daughter Bristol Palin’s out‑of‑wedlock pregnancy was handled rather differently from Bill Clinton’s legendary philandering. Bloggers muddied the waters by spreading rumors about Sarah’s Down syndrome child, Trig: “Was he really Bristol’s?” they asked. A tale of baby swapping was meant to suggest a new twist on the backwoods immorality of inbred illegitimacy. Recall that it was Bill Clinton’s mother, Virginia, whose pedigree most troubled the critics. The legacy held: the rhetoric supporting eugenics (and the sterilization laws that followed) mainly targeted women as tainted breeders.
 
Sarah Palin’s Fargo-esque accent made her tortured speech patterns sound even worse. Former TV talk show host Dick Cavett wrote a scathing satirical piece in which he dubbed her a “serial syntax killer” whose high school English department deserved to be draped in black. He wanted to know how her swooning fans, who adored her for being a “mom like me,” or were impressed to see her shooting wolves, could explain how any of those traits would help her to govern.
 
We had been down this road before as citizens and voters. “Honest Abe” Lincoln was called an ape, a mudsill, and Kentucky white trash. Andrew Jackson was a rude, ill-tempered cracker. (And like Palin, his grammar was nothing to brag about.) The question loomed: At what point does commonness cease to be an asset, as a viable form of populism, and become a liability for a political actor? And should anyone be shocked when voters are swept up in an “almost Elvis-sized following,” as Cavett said Palin’s were? When you turn an election into a three-ring circus, there’s always a chance that the dancing bear will win.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations xi

Preface to the Paperback Edition xiii

Preface xxv

Introduction: Fables We Forget By 1

Part I To Begin the World Anew

Chapter 1 Taking Out the Trash: Waste People in the New World 17

Chapter 2 John Locke's Lubberland: The Settlements of Carolina and Georgia 43

Chapter 3 Benjamin Franklin's American Breed: The Demographics of Mediocrity 64

Chapter 4 Thomas Jefferson's Rubbish: A Curious Topography of Class 85

Chapter 5 Andrew Jackson's Cracker Country: The Squatter as Common Man 105

Part II Degeneration of the American Breed

Chapter 6 Pedigree and Poor White Trash: Bad Blood, Half-Breeds, and Clay-Eaters 135

Chapter 7 Cowards, Poltroons, and Mudsills: Civil War as Class Warfare 154

Chapter 8 Thoroughbreds and Scalawags: Bloodlines and Bastard Stock in the Age of Eugenics 174

Chapter 9 Forgotten Men and Poor Folk: Downward Mobility and the Great Depression 206

Chapter 10 The Cult of the Country Boy: Elvis Presley, Andy Griffith, and LBJ's Great Society 231

Part III The White Trash Makeover

Chapter 11 Redneck Roots: Deliverance, Billy Beer, and Tammy Faye 269

Chapter 12 Outing Rednecks: Slumming, Slick Willie, and Sarah Palin 291

Epilogue: America's Strange Breed: The Long Legacy of White Trash 310

Notes 323

Index 449

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White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Disturbing yet enlighening work much akin to Howard Zinns "A History of the People ... " Begs the question why have so many resources have gone into raising the black lower class & so little effort to help poor southern whites. Clearly both have suffered equally under this land of the free.
navidad_thelamour More than 1 year ago
“If this book accomplishes anything it will be to have exposed a number of myths about the American dream, to have disabused readers of the notion that upward mobility is a function of the founders’ ingenious plan…” Nancy Isenberg’s White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America is a kamikaze of research and hard-hitting assessments of our country’s attitude toward the “poor” and “shiftless” masses. It delves into the historical inaccuracies and missteps of a nation, our nation, and is a read to be savored and thoughtfully digested. Isenberg commences from the stance that she is addressing the fallacious and glossed-over condition of class relations in the U.S., because many Americans (truly, the world) genuinely believe in America as a classless society of un-threatened upward mobility potential. Firstly, if there is, in fact, someone—anyone—out there who honestly believes that class relations don’t exist front and center in America then 1) you need to run and grab this book (and 10 more just like it immediately, now, on your lunch break even!) and 2) might I ask, “What rock have you been hiding under?” Nancy Isenberg’s survey of American culture from Plymouth Rock to Sarah Palin offers something for everyone. Here she unravels history and popularized tales of John Locke, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, the “cracker” president, and even Pocahontas has her Disney-romanticized “diva” status stripped away and re-examined. Isenberg methodically tackles the rise and fall of the Confederacy, the eugenics craze that swept America for decades (still seen today in the form of modern-day dating websites such as eHarmony and Match.com), “The New Deal,” LBJ’s “Great Society” policies, desegregation and shifts in American culture that led to the rise of modern-day “white trash reality TV.” And while I did feel a bit leaden down with the dozens of pages of historical facts on these former presidents in Part I, when I was more interested in the meat of the argument, the task of setting the foundation for her argument was achieved and Part II onward flowed seamlessly. Historical documentation, photographs and illustrations also helped to set the scene and illustrate her assertions in way that was easily digestible. With White Trash, Isenberg demands us to ask ourselves, “What really is the American dream? Does it really exist? And if not, what truly stands in its stead?” These are the questions that you will explore, sometimes overtly and sometimes not. She offers some truly eye-opening observations and threads together the fabric of our American history into a full picture for readers to take a step back from and justly scrutinize. Within these pages, you’ll find humor and biting wit, punchlines that sink deeply into your psyche and assertions that are backed by meticulous research. Isenberg takes a clear and definitive stance in White Trash, writing specifically from a poor-white-centric lens, and honestly, that really appealed to me. Thankfully, she strips away the politically correct, granola pedagogy that we Americans like to think of as good manners and gets straight to the point of her argument: that the idea of American classlessness is a fanciful notion that never truly existed, and that poor whites have always been a significant force at the center of the debate. From the annihilation of... To see the full review and others, go to The Navi Review @ www.thenavireview.com
Anonymous 11 months ago
A truthful, marvelous historical analysis of class in the USA. At times it becomes a bit harder to read and stay with it due to its technical nature for the why. If I could I would give it 4.5 stars. You must love history of the USA to read it. One learns a lot more of the historical truth of US and its England roots. This should be used in the schools.
Anonymous 12 months ago
The way the author has used the technology the full pages can be seen with only the next to smallest type size. There is no reason an ebook should have this problem. I am giving it two stars because the recipes with their teeny tiny writing look like they are probably good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really quite thought provoking.
-traveler- More than 1 year ago
Three of the four people who reviewed this book didn't read it. Why is B&N posting theiron reviews. Perhaps a modicum of scrutiny would help give a more accurate review.
Delphimo More than 1 year ago
What an interesting book about the history of class in America, and to learn the founding fathers who absolute snobs. In the land of equality, the poor still suffer a meagre existence and have little hope of advancement. Isenberg covered each and every president and the discussion that not many presidents rose from rags to riches. Andrew Jackson and his wife Rachel remain the ultimate "trash" in regard to prior presidents throughout the roster of American leaders. I had not known that America had such an extreme class structure in the early history, as I thought that all citizens struggled to survive and find freedom in this New World.
growingoldoffensively More than 1 year ago
If the pablum served up as history had a butt Ms. Isenberg just set it on fire. White Trash is as cold-blooded, steely-eyed, well reserached and passionately written a look as history gets. Very enlightening but disturbing stuff. Gives profound lie to some of the great myths we bask in regularly.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an important piece of literary work. It should be read by every American. It isn't trash, but an eye opening look at our history.
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