Year of Impossible Goodbyes

Year of Impossible Goodbyes

Paperback(Reissue)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780440407591
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 01/28/1993
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 169
Sales rank: 133,733
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 7.63(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Sook Nyul Choi was born in Pyongyang, North Korea. As a young refugee during the Korean War, Choi learned to face injustice and cruelty with courage and determination. Choi’s novels, which are based upon her own experiences, have enriched the lives of young people all over the world.Choi emigrated to the Unites States to pursue her college education. She graduated from Manhattanville College in 1962. Except for a brief period during which she worked in the business world, she taught in public and parochial schools in New York and Massachusetts for 20 years while raising her two daughters. Sook Nyul Choi is the author of Year of Impossible Goodbyes, a novel about 10-year-old Sookan and her life in Korea during the aftermath of World War II. It has been translated into Korean, French, Italian, and Japanese. It is an ALA Notable Book and has received many other honors as well.Choi also wrote Echoes of the White Giraffe, a sequel to Year of Impossible Goodbyes. Sookan, again the main character, is now 15 and a refugee growing up amidst the sorrows of the Korean War. Her story brings to life the time, place, and intense emotions of a people surrounded by turmoil and tragedy.

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Year of Impossible Goodbyes 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was such a good book. The first time I read it was in 7th grade when my teacher put out a couple of choices to choose from, no one chose 'Year of Impossible Goodbyes' so I chose to read it. I had to do a book report on that, I got a 100%!!! I read it 2 more times after that. Once, in 8th grade and again in 9th grade. In my opinion, I think everyone should read this book!!! And don't forget there is a part 2.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think that this was a great book. I read this book when i was in 6th grade when we had different books to choose from. I thought that this was a good book because it's exciting,sad, and based on reality. I definetly recomend this book. Also some people can relate to it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book really teachs both the student and teacher about the Korean War since we do not really talk about it in other classes. It focuses on the struggle of a family to keep their Korean lifestlye and beliefs during the time of Japanese control.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Year Of Impossible Goodbyes is the best book I've read this year. We're reading it in class, and it is very interesting. It doesn't just talk about the battles in the war, instead, it shows what the regular people had to go through. I definitely reccomend this book!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great story; very inspiring and very interesting.
Beatrice Hatfield More than 1 year ago
I LOVED this book! The characters are interesting and I love how the author really shows each characters personality and role in the story. Really sad, yet happy. Just loved it. Wish they had it available in Hangul.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Set in 1945 during World War II, Year of Impossible Goodbyes describes the life of Koreans under both Japanese and Russian control. Choi was born in Pyongyang, North Korea, which is where this story takes place. She wrote from her own experiences to tell about life in Korea during World War II. The accounts given of life during this time are very accurate because Choi herself experienced them with her family. Choi described the daily life of Koreans under Japanese control as terrifying and devastating, and after reading this book, it is easy to understand why. Koreans were stripped of all valuable property, removed from their homes, given not nearly enough food for their families, and expected to do back breaking work for little or no pay. Under Russian control, life seemed to be immediately better, before people realized that it was really no different than the Japanese occupation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is about a 10 year old girl who suffers from the japannese. This book is a enspiring book because it teaches you a lot.I reccomend people of all ages to read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book ranks up there with books such as The Diary of Anne Frank. This one is written simply enough that a child can read it; yet it is packed full of historical, cultural and visual details which make it also informative and compelling for a reader of any age. Non-Korean readers get a window into the recent past of this great and gentle nation through the eyes of an innocent young girl.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book is awsome. at the end i cried because its beautiful book. some parts are really sad though.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a teacher I would strongly recommend this book. It deals with many issues very delicately and with tact. It's very powerful and a moving story about a young Korean girl who lives during a time of great turmoil. The author combines aspects of human life and history to create a phenmonal book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is undoubtedly one of the greatest books I've ever read. It uncovers a more-or-less untold facet of WWII. We often focus on the Holocaust, which, don't get me wrong, was horrible, but this shows a point of view from victims in other parts of the world. What this book ultimately proves is that no matter how you look at it, war wreaks havoc on everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
great novel i ever read. actually i wanna give 4.5 *...well,count as 5
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was a disapointed. I usually like books that have do with the wars. I felt that the Author carried on and should of been more direct.
elpowers on LibraryThing 2 days ago
Sookan's family is terrorized by Cpt. Narita during WWII. Town is conforming from one oppressive regime to another. Sookan finally flees with the rest of her family (grandpa, aunt and cousin die).
jakdomin on LibraryThing 2 days ago
¿Year of the Impossible Goodbyes¿ is definitely a book that should be used in class for kids to reflect on the human spirit. Although the setting is Japanese-occupied Korea during WW2 and plays an important part in the story line, kids should be able to relate to the characters in a generalized sense, knowing what is is like to be part of a family and how one might feel if their own family was torn apart like the one in the story. The story line is vivid and descriptive of the times, but lacks the type of depth that could be further explored in class with a self-reflection-type exercise. The book also serves to teach about an important time in history from a perspective other than that of the U.S. Books like this where the main characters are foreign help in teaching kids tolerance, compassion, understanding, and humanity, while American-only perspectives can sometimes inhibit these important lessons.
ALelliott on LibraryThing 2 days ago
For students:World War II contains infinite stories. Some we have heard many times, and others we haven't. Take a peek into a story that perhaps you haven't heard before, of Sookan, a young girl living in Northern Korea during and right after World War II. Sookan lives with her mother, grandfather, and younger brother in a small house in Pyongyang, producing socks for the Japanese military. As they wait for Sookan's father and older brothers to return, they endure many hardships at the hands of the Japanese occupiers. At last, the war is over, but it seems that their troubles are not.Told with strength and grace, this is a wonderfully told story of a family's fight for survival, even in the face of terrible cruelty and oppression. The author lived in Korea as a child during this time, enduring some of the same suffering Sookan endures. You will enjoy this book if you like realistic historical fiction, books about people overcoming terrible hardship, or if you enjoy reading about people in faraway places.For educators and librarians:A wonderful addition to your collection, this book is heartbreaking, but ultimately full of hope. While a few students may be familiar with the Japanese occupation of Korea during World War II, many more are not, and will find this story enriching and exciting.Reading level: 11 and upAppropriateness: some of the violence is graphic, but never superfluousKids who would like this book: students interested in World War II, especially looking beyond the often Eurocentric domination of such literatureHighly recommended.
t1bclasslibrary on LibraryThing 3 months ago
This book describes a young girl's life in North Korea when it is first controlled by the Japanese and then by the Russians. Both groups impose a state of slavery and misery on her family, only relieved by her escape to South Korea with her mother and little brother. I get the impression that this is semi-autobiographical.
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