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Motivation for Creative People: How to Stay Creative While Gaining Money, Fame, and Reputation
     

Motivation for Creative People: How to Stay Creative While Gaining Money, Fame, and Reputation

5.0 2
by Mark McGuinness
 

“This is a How To manual at the highest level from a man who has lived the life and has watched and worked intimately with hundreds of others who’ve done the same. Indispensable reading for anyone in a creative field who is seeking to achieve not just a flash of brilliance but a lifelong career.” 

Steven Pressfield,

Overview

“This is a How To manual at the highest level from a man who has lived the life and has watched and worked intimately with hundreds of others who’ve done the same. Indispensable reading for anyone in a creative field who is seeking to achieve not just a flash of brilliance but a lifelong career.” 

Steven Pressfield, bestselling author of The War of Art


“I love my work so much I would do it for free.”

Many creative people have uttered these words in a moment of enthusiasm—they express the joy of creative work. But they also hint at some of the pitfalls that lie in wait for creatives . . . 

In one sense, creative people have no problem with motivation. We fall in love with our creative work and pursue a career that allows us to do what we love every day. 

Psychological research confirms what we know in our hearts: we are at our most creative when we are driven by intrinsic motivation—working for the sheer joy of it, regardless of rewards. Focusing on extrinsic motivation—such as money, fame, or other rewards—can kill your creativity. 

Working for love is all well and good, but if you’re a creative professional you can’t ignore the rewards: you need money to enjoy your life and to fund your projects. You may not need to be famous, but you do need a good reputation within your professional network. And if you’re in a fame-driven industry you need a powerful public profile, whether or not you enjoy the limelight.

There’s a precious balance at play—get it wrong, and you could seriously damage your creativity and even your career. 

For the past twenty years creative coach Mark McGuinness has helped hundreds of creatives like you to overcome these challenges. A poet and creative entrepreneur, his last book, Resilience: Facing Down Rejection and Criticism on the Road to Success, is an Amazon.com Creativity best seller.

In his latest book, Motivation for Creative People, Mark helps you rise to these challenges and create a fulfilling and rewarding creative career. All the solutions he shares have been tested with real people in real situations, including ways to:

* stay creative and in love with your work—even under pressure
* overcome Resistance to tackling your creative challenges
* reclaim your creative soul if you wander off your true path
* stop selling yourself short—and start reaping the rewards of your creativity
* attract the right kind of audience for your work
* cultivate an outstanding artistic reputation
* avoid destroying your creativity through attachment to money, fame, reputation, and other rewards
* surround yourself with people who support your creative ambitions
* avoid getting stuck in unhealthy comparisonitis or professional jealousy
* balance your inspiration, ambition, desires, and influences in the big picture of your creative career

Motivation for Creative People is the perfect guide to figuring out your different motivations and how they affect your creativity and career. 

The book is packed with practical advice and inspiring stories from Mark’s own experience, his transformative work with coaching clients, and famous creators and creations—including Stanley Kubrick, Dante, The Smiths, Shakespeare, kabuki drama, and Breaking Bad.

If you are serious about succeeding in your creative career—while staying true to your inspiration—read Motivation for Creative People.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940152327656
Publisher:
Lateral Action Books
Publication date:
10/28/2015
Sold by:
Draft2Digital
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
670,829
File size:
625 KB

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Motivation for Creative People: How to Stay Creative While Gaining Money, Fame, and Reputation 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well named! This book hit all the pain points: hiding from my own creative desires, resistance and how to handle it—both to making and to networking. Thinking its all about doing it alone, thinking it has to be perfect, thinking it has to be brand new. Mark has a great ability to move from the big picture to what this might mean to me in a way that makes me zero in on what in fact the big picture of things like making a living while being an artist DOES mean to me. There is a great spirit of generosity in this book, and it encouraged me to be generous to myself. Here are some ideas that were key for me: • Resistance arises second. The dream comes first. • Focus on CREATING VALUE rather than making money • Extrinsic rewards are TOOLS TO GET THINGS DONE not goals in themselves • People who share my taste are a valid market segment for me to poll • “Think of yourself as the owner of a global media company” • Courage is about working with what scares me • Power (as a word) means the capacity for action • The importance of the tribe - satisfaction of contributing to the tradition / group I are part of. Ability to add to history by creating a dialogue with the past of my creative tradition The exercises are not necessarily new, but they are unusually thorough and presented at points within the text that make them resonate. Finally, the resources (quotes, poems, websites, people, books) cited are smart, eclectic and useful. I am recommending this book widely!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you think you have the spark of creativity in you but haven’t given it a chance to come out yet, read this book. It will give you a few important clues and lead your first hesitant steps to a place where you can rest a moment and have a good think about it. If your creativity is already showing and is perhaps burning to become your profession, read this book. It will clear away a few of the wrong assumptions and beliefs which invariably turn into big obstacles in creatives’ day-to day-effort to live their vocation. And if you are a professional creative who doesn’t need any special kick to get out of bed in the morning because you are fired-up about your art, read this book! It will ask you a couple of questions to which you might not have a ready (and totally satisfactory) answer. But this book is not only about motivation, it is about the thorny issue of justifying our existence as creatives as well, and about reclaiming our place in the modern world. It is an elegant and inspiring read, to be enjoyed with a good coffee, coloured paper, and a pair of scissors. I got a free review copy from the Author but am very likely to buy a few more to give to fellow creatives going through a difficult phase!