Ape and Essence

Ape and Essence

by Aldous Huxley

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780929587783
Publisher: Dee, Ivan R. Publisher
Publication date: 08/25/1992
Pages: 222
Sales rank: 159,064
Product dimensions: 5.44(w) x 8.03(h) x 0.65(d)

About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894–1963), one of the most important English novelists of the twentieth century, is best known for Brave New World, Point Counter Point, Crome Yellow, and other novels, as well as his Collected Short Stories, also published by Ivan R. Dee.

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Ape and Essence 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
deathjoy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Somewhat interesting and written in Huxley's recognizable style, yet too ham-fisted in making its point. Amusing story if nothing else.
apc251 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The book starts out at a Hollywood studio where a dumptruck bearing rejected movie scripts is headed to the incenerator. One falls out and the author and his friend scoop it up and start to read it. Intrigued they go in search of the author who has since died. The book is a script and it is strange, fascinating, and comical. It was written around the time when the arms race was heating up and the threat of atomic annhilation was (and still is in some respects) all too real.This is but one example of Huxley's expansive imagination.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
i found this book highly vivid and enchanting in its style of writing and content. much like BNW, huxley took out all the stops and displayed the truth without regret and illustrated the essence of humanity. well done.
Guest More than 1 year ago
we know huxley is a master in the literary world, and we know that he can write anti-utopian fiction, just read Brave New World. this is along the same lines, though without the niceties of BNW. and without the excellence of BNW. maybe it was the experimentation Huxley did with the form of the novel. but huxley still says a lot, perhaps more in this than he did in BNW. i'd recommend reading it just for the philosophy of huxley, but if you are expecting BNW, you are going to be dissapointed.