Changer

Changer

by Jane Lindskold

NOOK Book(eBook)

$4.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Product Details

BN ID: 2940013443242
Publisher: Obsidian Tiger Books
Publication date: 12/05/2011
Series: Athanor , #1
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 508
Sales rank: 800,654
File size: 772 KB

About the Author

Jane Lindskold is the award-winning, best-selling, internationally published author of over sixty short stories and twenty-some novels, as well as a considerable amount of non-fiction. A former English professor, she has been a full-time writer since 1994. She currently resides in New Mexico with her husband, archeologist Jim Moore, assorted small animals, and a garden that keeps her busy enough that it should qualify as another pet.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Changer 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The coyote Changer returns from the hunt one evening to find his mate and pups killed by ranchers. But Changer is no ordinary coyote; he is one of the immortal anathor and a shape-shifter. Enraged, he takes human form to seek his vengeance. The trail quickly points to another of the anathor, and so he goes to Arthur Pendragon to register his vendetta. Arthur is the king of the Accord, a government of sorts for the eclectic mix of immortals that make up the anathor: shape-shifters, sorcerers, animals and mythic creatures such as yeti and fauns. Joining forces, Changer and members of Arthur¿s court find that the murder of the coyotes is just one facet of a much larger plot. Changer tries to protect his one remaining coyote pup while digging further into the mystery of who instigated the slaughter of his family. In the meantime, Arthur and his court are beset with their own share of difficulties, including pranksters, assassins, human reporters, and political turmoil. The hidden anathor, the ones that cannot pass for human, are increasingly agitating for the existence of the anathor to become public so that they can live in the open. The threads of trouble are woven together deftly; saving the Accord will stretch Changer, Arthur and the others to the limits of their abilities. The idea that ancient gods, legends and myths were all sourced from individual immortals is interesting and author Jane Linskold does a good job of tying together similar archetypes from several different cultures. Her various incarnations of Arthur Pendragon, the hero king, include King Arthur, Frey of Norse legend, the pharaoh Akhenaton, and Gilgamesh. Linkskold also manages to inject humor into the mix, imagine sasquatches and satyrs chatting over the Internet or the idea that Elvis was also Dionysus. I liked this book a lot. The plot grabbed me immediately and the characters are interesting and complex. Even though the characters are immortal, they are by no means portrayed as perfect which makes them easier to identify with. It was easy to cheer on the good guys in their defense of the Accord. But it was also nice that not everything dealt with in terms of pure black and white. There are several shades-of-grey issues dealt with in the book including the needs of the hidden ones and whether or not the anathor should interfere in various current problems such as the destruction of the rain forests.
mtwaldman on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I loved this book. This book was so enjoyable to me. Everytime I hear that Jane is writing a new book, I always hope she is returning to write more books about the Athanor. This book is one of my favorite books that I have read multiple times. For anyone who enjoys modern tales of the fantastic this is a must read and if you collect books, addition to your collection.
Ella_Jill on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This is a fantasy novel based on a premise that ancient gods, legendary heroes and other mythological personages were actual immortal beings who move from place to place and give rise to legends wherever they appear. Some of them can change their shapes (as the title character), and some actually prefer to live quietly (again as the title character), an option that has become practically mandatory now that people have become less accepting of beings with wide-reaching abilities whom they can¿t control. And not all immortals are happy with the change, naturally enough. So the novel opens. Throw into the mix a number of sasquatches, satyrs and other mythological beings who can¿t even hope to pass for humble citizens, and you get a novel with no easy solutions ¿ not to mention a collection of interesting and surprisingly realistic individuals.This novel has a sequel titled Legends Walking, which I personally didn¿t enjoy as much, partly because it¿s full of brutality of the worst kind and partly because, while Changer has many immortal characters solving their problems while living mostly in the stable North America, the sequel features three immortals helping Nigerian locals in their struggle against an oppressive would be dictator.
CatherineMarie on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This is a wonderfully imagined book. The gods, kings of legend, heroes of legend, live among us. The figures of myth, nymphs, satyrs, mermaids, selkies...actually exist. A superb read for those adults who grew up in Narnia, in Greek mythology, and who, in some little corner of their hearts, still beleive. This is a story that is well-thought out, even with all the twists and turns and deviousness worthy of Loki. I highly reccomend this.
raegroup on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Excellent story. The characters are at the same time fantastic and believable. Certainly one of the best attempts at placing fantasy themes into a modern day recognizable world I have read. Also contains one of the most horrifying and yet compelling torture scenes I have read. Defiantly a "Cant put it Down" read.
celestialfingerpaint on LibraryThing 11 months ago
I really enjoyed this book, and I've gone back and read it again because it was so delightful! The thing is, it's not the main story that interested me so much. It was the identities of the immortals. Especially the appearance of St. Francis... my favorite Saint.
jmvilches on LibraryThing 11 months ago
The coyote Changer returns from the hunt one evening to find his mate and pups killed by ranchers. But Changer is no ordinary coyote; he is one of the immortal anathor and a shape-shifter. Enraged, he takes human form to seek his vengeance. The trail quickly points to another of the anathor, and so he goes to Arthur Pendragon to register his vendetta. Arthur is the king of the Accord, a government of sorts for the eclectic mix of immortals that make up the anathor: shape-shifters, sorcerers, animals and mythic creatures such as yeti and fauns.Joining forces, Changer and members of Arthur's court find that the murder of the coyotes is just one facet of a much larger plot. Changer tries to protect his one remaining coyote pup while digging further into the mystery of who instigated the slaughter of his family. In the meantime, Arthur and his court are beset with their own share of difficulties, including pranksters, assassins, human reporters, and political turmoil. The hidden anathor, the ones that cannot pass for human, are increasingly agitating for the existence of the anathor to become public so that they can live in the open. The threads of trouble are woven together deftly; saving the Accord will stretch Changer, Arthur and the others to the limits of their abilities.The idea that ancient gods, legends and myths were all sourced from individual immortals is interesting and author Jane Linskold does a good job of tying together similar archetypes from several different cultures. Her various incarnations of Arthur Pendragon, the hero king, include King Arthur, Frey of Norse legend, the pharaoh Akhenaton, and Gilgamesh. Linkskold also manages to inject humor into the mix, imagine sasquatches and satyrs chatting over the Internet or the idea that Elvis was also Dionysus.I liked this book a lot. The plot grabbed me immediately and the characters are interesting and complex. Even though the characters are immortal, they are by no means portrayed as perfect which makes them easier to identify with. It was easy to cheer on the good guys in their defense of the Accord. But it was also nice that not everything dealt with in terms of pure black and white. There are several shades-of-grey issues dealt with in the book including the needs of the hidden ones and whether or not the anathor should interfere in various current problems such as the destruction of the rain forests.4 Stars
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
foxycatz68 More than 1 year ago
I like this book a lot easy reading exciting in places a different concept of shifters. looking to read more of ms lindskold books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago