Douglas Adams's Starship Titanic

Douglas Adams's Starship Titanic

by Terry Jones
3.8 36

NOOK Book(eBook)

$1.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

Douglas Adams's Starship Titanic by Terry Jones

In this thoroughly satisfying and completely disorienting novel based on a story line by Douglas Adams (author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy), Terry Jones recounts an unforgettable tale of intergalactic travel and mishap. The saga of "the ship that cannot possibly go wrong" sparkles with wit, danger, and confusion that will keep readers guessing which reality they are in and how, on earth, to find their way out again.

At the center of the galaxy, a vast, unknown civilization is preparing for an event of epic proportions: the launching of the greatest, most gorgeous, most technologically advanced Starship ever built-the Starship Titanic.

An earthling would see it as a mixture of the Chrysler Building, the tomb of Tutankhamen, and Venice. But less provincial onlookers would recognize it as the design of Leovinus, the galaxy's most renowned architect. He is an old man now, and the creation of the Starship Titanic is the pinnacle achievement of his twenty-year career.

The night before the launch, Leovinus is prowling around the ship having a last little look. With mounting alarm he begins to find things are not right: unfinished workmanship, cybersystems not working correctly, robots colliding with doors. How could this have happened? And how could this have happened without his knowing?

Something somewhere is terribly wrong.

On the following day, in an artificial event staged for the media, the Starship Titanic will leave its construction dock under autopilot and, a few days later, make its way to the terminal to pick up passengers for its maiden voyage. Although the ship will be deserted during its very first flight, it is nevertheless a major event, watched by all the galaxy's media.

Hugely, magnificently, the fabulous ship eases its way forward from the construction dock, picks up speed, sways a bit, wobbles a bit, veers wildly, and just before it can do massive damage to everything around it, appears to undergo SMEF (Spontaneous Massive Existence Failure).

In just ten seconds, the whole, stupendous enterprise is over. And our story has just begun.

Somehow three earthlings, one Blerontin journalist, a semideranged parrot, and a shipful of disoriented robots must overcome their differences. It's the only way to save the Starship Titanic ("The Ship That Cannot Possibly Go Wrong") from certain destruction and rescue the economy of an entire planet-not to mention to survive the latest threat, an attack by a swarm of hostile shipbuilders. . . .


From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307415073
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/18/2007
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 478
File size: 864 KB

About the Author

Terry Jones is one of the original creators of Monty Python's Flying Circus. He is also a film and television director, a scriptwriter, a medieval scholar, and author of various children's books, including the award-winning The Saga of Erik the Viking and (with Michael Palin) Dr. Fegg's Encyclopedia of All World Knowledge. He lives in London.


From the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Douglas Adams's Starship Titanic 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Terry Jones....I think no one but hime could have possibly mastered (or atleast came close to) the Adamsesque form of writing....A wonderful book for not being written by adams himself
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this book! Written by a Monty Python with Douglas Adams providing the idea is a recipe for greatness! It's funny, wierd, wacky and silly, all at once.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a great book for people who like action stories, but still like to laugh. It is about the greatest luxury cruise starship in the known galaxy, or so it was rumored. It was designed to be built by the Yassacans, a humble race of highly acclaimed craftsman, but materials were too costly, and the planet Yassaca went bankrupt trying to complete it. So, the construction was moved to Bleratonia, where corners were cut. Scralontis, Leovinius's accountant, cut down on expenses by leaving things out and buying cheaper materials. Upon the launch, the ship undergoes SMEF and dissappears. Or so everybody thinks. the Starship Titanic ends up crash-landing on Earth, right in the middle of Dan and Lucys rectory. There, Dan, lucy, and Nettie board. It turns out that the whole ship is nothing but a giant spaceship shell. Also, the ship has a bomb planted on it. The only way to shut the bomb is to get Titania, the ships centeral intellegence core running again,and Titania is missing a brain piece. If they can't defuse the bomb, not only will they be taken to their fiery death, but Yassaca will not be able to collect money for the starship....
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Starship Titanic was a comical story by Terry Jones following the tradition of Douglas Adam¿s Hitchhiker¿s Guide books. It is a mock science fiction novel that takes every little aspect a real science fiction and tears it to shreds with odd plot twists and nonsense explanations of technical ideas. Robots have insecure personalities and can never seem to make sense, and the off-world aliens are so strange that one can¿t stop laughing. The story starts on a distant planet where the so called 'Galaxy¿s Greatest Genius' Levonius has just designed the biggest, most expensive, most fantastic starship ever built; the Titanic. Levonius had supervised the entire project from his home using advanced virtual-reality. On the night before the big launch Levonius decided to finally visit the ship without his virtual reality goggles. The starship looked beautiful on the outside, but he found that the inside wasn¿t even finished yet! Floors had gaping holes in them, heavy machinery was still all over the place, and worst of all, the electronics were in a chaotic conduction. Talking elevators only wanted to go up, dust sweeping robots were spilling dust instead of cleaning it up, and doorbots were trying to usher Levonius into open cement mixers. As it turned out, the builders had shown Levonius a false virtual world and had cut costs on the ship. They were going to scuttle it for the insurance money. Levonius was mad. On the day of the launch, the ship suffers Super Massive Existence Failure. The author¿s description falters here and the reader never really understands what SMEF is. Maybe that is the authors intent. Somehow though, the ship winds up on earth, and the adventure begins. Terry Jones does a very good job in his story telling. The plot he develops is basically just a bunch of out of order mumbo jumbo, but this is on purpose, and the finial effect is hilarious. Jones greatest strength is in his characterization. Not one character is without depth in the book. One even hears the sorrows of a talking bomb that can never seem to keep his countdown straight. (He never wanted to blow up anyway.) Jones shows the differences between the interplanetary cultures well, with each side thinking the others are completely out of their mind. The Starship Titanic was an entertaining work. It provided the reader with even mix of adventure and comedy. While Terry Jones plot lines and characters are a bit out of the ordinary, the reader still closes the book with an immense feeling of satisfaction. I recommend the book to anyone looking for a good laugh.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a kid I always saw my dad reading douglas addams books. We then got a game called starship titanic I loved that game. I was told there was a book that inspired it and I just had to get it. I enjoyed the story and I recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Douglas Adams. I love Monty Python. This book is absolute trash. I can't put it any more clearly than that. It should simply never have been written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago