Dying to Play

Dying to Play

by Debra Webb

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Overview

Dying to Play by Debra Webb

A baffling series of multiple homicides leaves Atlanta's Deputy Chief of Detectives Elaine Jentzen no choice but to call in FBI agent Trace Callahan. Elaine is aware of Trace's reputation for being as ruthless as the killers he tracks—but she isn't prepared for the immediate and dangerous attraction that ignites between them.
Trace is convinced a serial killer known as the Gamekeeper is behind the deadly sprees. But all the evidence begins to point to Trace—until Elaine discovers a link in the crimes: a computer game with an ominous warning—Trace will be next to die. Now the only way Elaine can save Trace is if she plays the game. But not by the Gamekeeper's rules….


Previously Published.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781459290983
Publisher: Harlequin
Publication date: 11/16/2015
Sold by: HARLEQUIN
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 117,916
File size: 656 KB

About the Author

DEBRA WEBB is the award winning, USA Today bestselling author of more than 130 novels, including reader favorites the Faces of Evil, the Colby Agency, and the Shades of Death series. With more than four million books sold in numerous languages and countries, Debra's love of storytelling goes back to her childhood on a farm in Alabama. Visit Debra at www.DebraWebb.com or write to her at PO Box 176, Madison, AL 35758.

Customer Reviews

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Dying to Play 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
susan402 on LibraryThing 1 days ago
I hope this book will not be missed by Webb fans. Because most of Webb¿s books that I¿ve read are in Harlequin¿s Intrigue line and limited to 75,000 words, a longer novel in which she has more time to develop characters and plot is a treat. The characters in this novel are Elaine Jentzen and Trace Callahan. Elaine is a highly successful police detective on the rise, and Trace is a burned-out FBI desk jockey hanging by a thread. They are brought together by the Gamekeeper, the serial killer who precipitated Trace¿s fall from ¿super agent¿ stardom. One thing that¿s nice about Webb¿s work is that her heroines kick butt without seeming like men in skirts, and even her weaker male characters are all man and generally in possession of some inner masculine strength. Elaine bears up beautifully under stressful personal/family situations that keep intruding while her bosses up to the mayor clamor for progress in the investigation. Trace deals with the suspicions of the local cops and his overall lack of credibility. He knows the Gamekeeper is back, but the Gamekeeper is supposed to be dead.I found the romantic plot to be somewhat downplayed, especially in the beginning. This makes the novel seem, at times, more like mainstream suspense than romance. But that¿s not a bad thing in this case. Totally worth reading and highly recommended.
Ellen-oceanside More than 1 year ago
DYING TO PLAY by Debra Webb. The Gamekeeper, no one else had the game. It wasn't the body count, it was drawing his enemy closer in to the game..The FBI Trace and Deputy Chief Elaine are partnered, to concentration on this case. Can Trace and Elaine figure out what the game plan is, before more deaths. How does the gamekeeper think about Trace being here, he almost got caught once before, is there a bit of revenge for the two of them. This is a fast pace plot, the details as they happen are good. Readers will enjoy another gripping story, you won't want to put down.
gmfuhlman More than 1 year ago
The characters in this book are Elaine Jentzen and Trace Callahan. Elaine Jentzen is the youngest Deputy Chief of Detectives of the Homicide Division in the Atlanta Police Department's history. She has work very hard to get where she is and there isn’t any time for romance. In fact, she doesn’t have a life outside of her job. Trace Callahan, is a FBI agent, who almost caught the elusive Gamekeeper once. Because of Trace, action his partner was killed and so he is dealing with the pain that haunts him every day. Dying to Play is a suspense with romance, that has bought two people together by the Gamekeeper who has a plan for them. There are so many twist and turn, that keep you guessing until the very last page. If you enjoy suspense with romance and throw in some evil person than you can’t miss this one.
KimberlyDawn55 More than 1 year ago
As always, Debra Webb writes a book that keeps you captivated throughout. Elaine and Trace work together to try to find a serial killer. But when Elaine starts to suspect Trace, something turns up that proves Trace is the next on the list. Can she find the killer in time? A great read!
Melody-Rose Parker More than 1 year ago
I received a review copy of Dying to Play and this is an honest review of the book. The first thing that absolutely thrilled me about Dying to Play is that the action was set in Atlanta, which is the closest big city to where I live. It is delightful to see such familiar places mentioned in the book. I love the characters in this book. Elaine Jentzen is a younger, female Chief of Detectives. She carries a lot of responsibility for a woman her age, and a history of competing for recognition of her talents within her male dominated family. Her partner, an older experienced detective knows how to play politics. He was a great foil for Elaine's obvious skill, and I was glad that even though he stepped aside to allow her to work a multiple homicide with the FBI's Trace Callahan, her partner kept an eye on Elaine. Trace Callahan is everything I like in a hero - he's had great tragedy in his past and is working toward redemption. He's intelligent, knowledgeable, skillful, even though he appears to be a burnout at the beginning of the book. Why has the FBI sent him to Atlanta? Why do they keep tabs on his work there? Lots of questions arise, revealing a very complex man in Trace. The characters are brought together because there's a string of multiple homicides. Normal people are killing others in bazaar circumstances for no apparent reason. How are they being leveraged into these crimes? Enter the Gamekeeper. Through most of the action, we don't know who the Gamekeeper is, only that Trace has worked on catching him in the past and knows that the Gamekeeper loves to trigger murder. Who are Elaine's and Trace's allies? How is the Gamekeeper hiding him or herself? You won't know the answers to these questions until the very end of the book. Filled with unexpected twists and turns, Dying to Play is a great read. Debra Webb hits it out of the park yet again. I highly recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
I once heard it said that there are only a limited number of plot lines available to write a romance story-that every romance book out there is a variation of one of these set "themes." I've read a lot of books that resemble each other in some ways, whether it be the type of characters in the story, the description of the villain, or the way the hero and heroine end up together. I'm happy to say, though, that it seems as if Ms. Webb never read the statement about all romances being alike-and if she did, she simply ignored it and wrote her own story. For that, we can all be happy, indeed!

I admit, DYING TO PLAY isn't the first romantic suspense story I've read by Debra Webb, and it invariably won't be the last. The reason is simple-this author has the ability to take two lead characters, throw in a non-typical baddy, mix it up with strong suspenseful situations, and have good overcome evil in a way that's usually not what you expected. This book is no different.

In Atlanta, Elaine Jentzen is in a precarious position. The youngest Deputy Chief of Detectives of the Homicide Division in the Atlanta Police Department's history, Elaine has no time for romantic entanglements, an active social life, or even dreams about having children of her own someday. A routine physical exam changes all of that, and at the worse possible time. While Deputy Chief Jentzen is finding out that she may never have children, a man walks into a bank, shoots the bank's President point-blank, and then turns the gun on himself.

What Elaine and her fellow officers don't understand is that the shooting at the bank is only a prelude of bad things to come. There's a game going on, one that Elaine is being pulled into unaware, that will put her face-to-face with the strongest, and most evil, of competitors. When Detective Jentzen is thrust into working with Trace Callahan, a burned-out FBI Agent fighting demons of his own past, Elaine is sure that things have just gone from bad to worse.

Little does she realize that Agent Callahan is the reason behind this evil computer game-Trace almost caught the elusive Gamekeeper once, and his partner died as a cause of his attempted heroic collar. Now the Gamekeeper is back, escalating his violence, drawing Trace farther and farther into his deadly web, and bringing Elaine along for the ride.

As the story progresses, you'll be on the edge of your seat, wondering yourself who could be behind this deadly game that Elaine and Trace have been caught up in. If you're like me, for once you won't be able to guess who the bad guy is, and that alone is worth reading this book.

DYING TO PLAY starts off with a bang and never lets the reader take a really big breath. Although the romantic relationship between Elaine and Trace waits until almost two-thirds of the book to develop, I can honestly say that I preferred it this way-in this story, at least, the elusive Gamekeeper and his demented game of hide and kill is the real story. The dialogue between the two main characters, the back-stabbing of Elaine's jealous fellow officers, the pain that still haunts Trace over the death of his partner, all work together to make DYING TO PLAY one of the best romantic suspense stories I've read this year.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I once heard it said that there are only a limited number of plot lines available to write a romance story-that every romance book out there is a variation of one of these set 'themes.' I've read a lot of books that resemble each other in some ways, whether it be the type of characters in the story, the description of the villain, or the way the hero and heroine end up together. I'm happy to say, though, that it seems as if Ms. Webb never read the statement about all romances being alike-and if she did, she simply ignored it and wrote her own story. For that, we can all be happy, indeed! I admit, DYING TO PLAY isn't the first romantic suspense story I've read by Debra Webb, and it invariably won't be the last. The reason is simple-this author has the ability to take two lead characters, throw in a non-typical baddy, mix it up with strong suspenseful situations, and have good overcome evil in a way that's usually not what you expected. This book is no different. In Atlanta, Elaine Jentzen is in a precarious position. The youngest Deputy Chief of Detectives of the Homicide Division in the Atlanta Police Department's history, Elaine has no time for romantic entanglements, an active social life, or even dreams about having children of her own someday. A routine physical exam changes all of that, and at the worse possible time. While Deputy Chief Jentzen is finding out that she may never have children, a man walks into a bank, shoots the bank's President point-blank, and then turns the gun on himself. What Elaine and her fellow officers don't understand is that the shooting at the bank is only a prelude of bad things to come. There's a game going on, one that Elaine is being pulled into unaware, that will put her face-to-face with the strongest, and most evil, of competitors. When Detective Jentzen is thrust into working with Trace Callahan, a burned-out FBI Agent fighting demons of his own past, Elaine is sure that things have just gone from bad to worse. Little does she realize that Agent Callahan is the reason behind this evil computer game-Trace almost caught the elusive Gamekeeper once, and his partner died as a cause of his attempted heroic collar. Now the Gamekeeper is back, escalating his violence, drawing Trace farther and farther into his deadly web, and bringing Elaine along for the ride. As the story progresses, you'll be on the edge of your seat, wondering yourself who could be behind this deadly game that Elaine and Trace have been caught up in. If you're like me, for once you won't be able to guess who the bad guy is, and that alone is worth reading this book. DYING TO PLAY starts off with a bang and never lets the reader take a really big breath. Although the romantic relationship between Elaine and Trace waits until almost two-thirds of the book to develop, I can honestly say that I preferred it this way-in this story, at least, the elusive Gamekeeper and his demented game of hide and kill is the real story. The dialogue between the two main characters, the back-stabbing of Elaine's jealous fellow officers, the pain that still haunts Trace over the death of his partner, all work together to make DYING TO PLAY one of the best romantic suspense stories I've read this year.