Food52 Vegan: 60 Vegetable-Driven Recipes for Any Kitchen

Food52 Vegan: 60 Vegetable-Driven Recipes for Any Kitchen

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781607747994
Publisher: Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale
Publication date: 09/22/2015
Series: Food52 Works Series
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 106,450
Product dimensions: 9.10(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

GENA HAMSHAW, who has written the New Veganism column on Food52 since 2012, is a certified clinical nutritionist and the author of the book Choosing Raw. Gena has been published in O Magazine, VegNews, and Whole Living Daily. She lives in New York City, where she is completing her masters degree in nutrition at Columbia University and leads workshops and cooking classes.

Founded by Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs in 2009, Food52 has become the premier online community for cooks of all levels, with more than thirty thousand recipes, a hotline, and a kitchen and home shop. It was named Best Food Publication at the 2012 James Beard Awards and Best Culinary Website at the 2013, 2014, and 2015 IACP Awards.

Read an Excerpt

Foreword

When it comes to cooking and eating, we subscribe to the credo of “eat everything, and in moderation.” And if we’re being honest, we tend to bristle at any regimen that hinges on the rejection of an entire class—or classes—of food. Part of this is due to our upbringing, part to our past experiences as adventurous eaters and food writers, and part to our beliefs about what it means to eat healthily.

They say that as you get older you become more strident in your convictions, but we like to think this is an area where we’ve loosened up a little. In particular, we were wary of vegan cooking until not too long ago. When Gena’s column, the New Veganism, first launched on Food52.com in 2012, it was with a primer on veganism and an accompanying recipe for raw kale salad with lentils and apricot vinaigrette.

Clean and almost spare, Gena’s style ran in complete opposition to the loving embrace we gave to cream and butter and crème fraîche—not to mention steak—for so long. And this was a stance that our audience loved us for, so we were unsure of how our readers would take a vegan column.
But Gena’s tolerant and graceful presentation of vegan cooking (and her use of real, seasonal ingredients) made converts of us all, and the column became one of our most widely read. This proved that our readers, like us, were not only willing but eager to let go of their preconceived notions and come along for the ride—whether they ate vegan all the time, or only for Meatless Mondays, or just liked eating more vegetable-driven dishes (or just more of Gena’s dishes, because they’re great).

We love that Gena’s angle isn’t always “look, you can make this, and it’s vegan.” Her column champions the enthusiasm shared by the entire Food52 community for the act of coming together around food and cooking. And she has an innate sense of what people actually want to eat
Gena’s recipes are often standouts at our photo shoots. Her Date Nut Bread (page 11) was a hot topic in the office for days; other team favorites from the book include Sweet Potato and Peanut Stew with Kale (page 54), Chilled Cucumber Soup with Mango Salsa (page 46), Roasted Ratatouille (page 101), and her Go-To Pancakes (page 8).

Even our most skeptical editors have now become the sort of people who keep a block of tofu in their fridges at all times—although that fridge may also contain anchovies or bacon or cheese or eggs. Or all five at once.

Over time, Gena has introduced us to things like nutritional yeast and cashew cheese and made them feel like new, exciting additions to our kitchens, rather than weird vegan substitutions. She was the first person to write about tempeh on the site. And now it’s not so weird anymore.
Eating vegan is, at its best, less a rejection of certain foods and more an embrace of foods that are bright and flavorful—as a bonus, they’re simply healthy for you, too. As Gena shows us, challenging yourself to think more expansively about these ingredients is gratifying for any cook, and will forever change the landscape of your kitchen.
—Amanda Hesser & Merrill Stubbs

Table of Contents

Breakfast
Muesli   | 3
Coconut Quinoa Porridge with Toasted Almonds  |  4
Green Smoothie with Avocado  |  7
Go-To Pancakes  |  8
Date Nut Bread  |  11
Peach Crumble Coffee Cake  |  12
Tempeh and Sweet Potato  Hash  |  15
Tofu Scramble  |  16
Polenta with Greens, Roasted Tomatoes, and Lentil Walnut Crumble  |  19
Breakfast Tostadas with Refried
Black Beans and Cabbage Slaw  |  20
Appetizers & Snacks
Five-Minute No-Bake
Granola Bars  |  25
Baked Kale Chips  |  26
Crispy Roasted Chickpeas  |  29
Socca  |  30
Sesame Flax Crackers  |  33
Sweet Pea Hummus  |  34
Parsnip Fries with Spicy Harissa
Mayonnaise  |  37
Polenta Squares with Sun-Dried
Tomato and Walnut Tapenade  |  38
Summer Rolls with Spicy Peanut Sauce  |  41
Soups
Creamy Tomato Soup  |  45
Chilled Cucumber Soup with
Mango Salsa  |  46
Gingered Carrot Bisque  |  49
Corn Chowder with Chive Oil  |  50
Miso Soup with Shiitakes, Soba,
and Asparagus  |  53
Sweet Potato and Peanut Stew with Kale  |  54
Jamaican Jerk Chili with Quinoa and Kidney Beans  |  57
Smoky Black Bean and Sweet
Potato Chili  |  58

Salads
Greek Salad with Tofu Feta  |  63
Kale Salad with Kabocha Squash, Toasted
Hazelnuts, and Pomegranate Seeds  |  64
Heirloom Tomato and Golden
Beet Panzanella  |  67
Snow Pea, Cabbage, and Mizuna
Salad with Smoky Tempeh  |  68
French Lentil and Arugula Salad with Herbed Cashew Cheese  |  71
Roasted Cauliflower and Freekeh Salad  |  72
Quinoa Salad with Sweet Potatoes,
Kale, and Pesto Vinaigrette  |  75
Wheat Berry and Green Bean Salad with
Dried Cranberries and Celery  |  76
Main Dishes
Penne with Summer Squash,
Corn, and Herbs  |  81
Orecchiette with Creamy Leeks and Broccoli Rabe  |  82
Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese  |  85
Asparagus, Arugula, and Pesto Pizza  |  86
Carrot and Fennel Pot Pie   | 89
Mushroom, Pecan, and Lentil Burgers  |  90
Zucchini Quinoa Cakes  |  92
Smoky Tempeh and Hummus
Sandwiches  |  94
Lentil Sloppy Joes  |  97
Tempeh Kebabs with
Barbecue Sauce  |  98
Roasted Ratatouille  |  101
Kabocha Squash and Tofu Curry  |  102
Eggplant Tagine with Millet and Preserved Lemon  |  105
Cauliflower and Oyster
Mushroom Tacos  |  106
Mushroom, Chard, and Quinoa
Enchiladas  |  109
Desserts
Ginger Roasted Pears with
Vanilla Cream  |  113
Banana Chia Pudding  |  114
Chai-Spiced Bread Pudding  |  117
Blackberry Coconut Ice Cream  |  118
Cranberry Pistachio Biscotti  |  121
Perfect Pumpkin Pie  |  122
Raw Citrus Cheesecake  |  125
Double-Chocolate Brownies  |  126
Chocolate Cake with Chocolate
Filling and Ganache  |  129
Mexican Chocolate Date Truffles  |  130

Customer Reviews

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Food52 Vegan: 60 Vegetable-Driven Recipes for Any Kitchen 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
nfmgirl More than 1 year ago
I’ve become a fan of Food52. I recently reviewed their book Genius Recipes, which garnered my very rare and coveted “A+” rating! And last night I made dinner using a recipe from their website. Food52 in general is not vegetarian, but this cookbook is the baby of Gena Hamshaw, who writes the column New Veganism for Food52. It's chock full of inventive and flavorful vegan goodies. The book begins with a foreword by Food52 founders Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs. They express their initial reservations regarding vegan cooking, but the author converted them. The foreword is followed by a brief Vegan 101 index, letting you know where you can find some essential information like "Getting to Know Some Vegan Staples" or "Essential Techniques". The book is divided up into chapters: Breakfast Appetizers & Snacks Soups Salads Main Dishes Desserts It's filled with beautiful photos. The ingredients are generally simple, common ingredients (at least for someone familiar with vegan dining. Some things like nondairy milk, tamari, or nutritional yeast may not be familiar to more traditional cooks). I didn’t notice anything that would be especially difficult to find in most modern grocery stores. There are lots of delicious-sounding recipes, like Peach Crumble Coffee Cake, Penne with Summer Squash, Corn and Herbs, Smoky Tempeh and Hummus Sandwiches and Chai-Spiced Bread Pudding. Also note that the index is searchable by ingredient or recipe. This book is put together well, the recipes are familiar yet presented with a twist, the ingredients are attainable. This book makes vegan cooking "friendly" and accessible.