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Fools Crow
     

Fools Crow

3.0 5
by James Welch, Thomas McGuane (Introduction)
 

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The 25th-anniversary edition of "a novel that in the sweep and inevitability of its events...is a major contribution to Native American literature." (Wallace Stegner)

In the Two Medicine Territory of Montana, the Lone Eaters, a small band of Blackfeet Indians, are living their immemorial life. The men hunt and mount the occasional horse-taking raid or war party

Overview

The 25th-anniversary edition of "a novel that in the sweep and inevitability of its events...is a major contribution to Native American literature." (Wallace Stegner)

In the Two Medicine Territory of Montana, the Lone Eaters, a small band of Blackfeet Indians, are living their immemorial life. The men hunt and mount the occasional horse-taking raid or war party against the enemy Crow. The women tan the hides, sew the beadwork, and raise the children. But the year is 1870, and the whites are moving into their land. Fools Crow, a young warrior and medicine man, has seen the future and knows that the newcomers will punish resistance with swift retribution. First published to broad acclaim in 1986, Fools Crow is James Welch's stunningly evocative portrait of his people's bygone way of life.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Suspenseful and moving, written with an authenticity and integrity that give it sweeping power, Welch's third novel (The Death of Jim Loney) is a masterful evocation of a Native American culture and its passing. From their lodges on the endless Montana plains, the members of the Lone Eaters band of the Pikuni (Blackfeet) Indians live in harmony with nature, hunting the ``blackhorns'' (buffalo), observing a complex system of political administration based on mutual respect and handing down legends that explain the natural world and govern daily conduct. The young protagonist is first called White Man's Dog, but earns the respected name Fools Crow for meritorious conduct in battle. Through his eyes we watch the escalating tensions between the Pikunis and the white men (``the Napikwans''), who deliberately violate treaties and initiate hostilities with the hard-pressed red men. At the same time, the feared ``white scabs plague'' (smallpox) decimates the Lone Eaters communities, and they realize that their days are numbered. There is much to savor in this remarkable book: the ease with which Fools Crow and his brethren converse with animals and spirits, the importance of dreams in their daily lives, the customs and ceremonies that measure the natural seasons and a person's lifespan. Without violating the patterns of Native American speech, Welsh writes in prose that surges and sings. This bittersweet story is an outstanding work. Illustrated. 25,000 first printing; major ad/promo. (November)
Library Journal
A portentous dream seems to overshadow the Lone Eaters clan of the Blackfeet Indians in the post-Civil War years. The slow invasion of the Napikwans, or whites, is inevitable and coincidental, however. As we follow White Man's Dog (later renamed Fools Crow), we see how some of his people try to follow the Napikwan ways, others rebel against them, and many ignore them. This alien force has both subtle and obvious methods of eliminating the tribal ways, and we watch individuals, families, and traditions crumbling. Welch's third novel ( Winter in the Blood, The Death of Jim Loney) is like finding a lifestyle preserved for a century and reanimated for our benefit and education. Recommended for anyone who wants to see what we have lost, and read a fine novel in the process. W. Keith McCoy, Dowdell Lib., South Amboy, N.J.
Dee Brown
Remarkable for its beauty of language...Maybe the closest we will ever come in western literature to understanding what life is like for a western Indian. -- Chicago Sun-Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143106517
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/25/2011
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
102,171
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

Wallace Stegner
A novel that in the sweep and inevitability of its events, in the human persuasiveness and variety of its characters, in the scrupulous authenticity of its cultural reconstruction, and in the sheer flow and strength of its prose, is a major contribution to American Literature.

Meet the Author

James Welch (1940-2003) wrote five novels, including Winter in the Blood. He attended schools on the Blackfeet and Fort Belknap reservations in Montana and studied at the University of Montana under the legendary writing teacher Richard Hugo.

Thomas McGuane is the author of ten novels, most recently Driving on the Rim. He lives on a ranch in Montana.

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Fools Crow 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was introduced to this book by my college english teacher. I could not put it down. Descriptions of the War Partys and the everyday life of the Blackfoot Indian are interesting as well as action packed. I enjoyed liked the Spiritual parts as well.I feel a better understanding to the indian culture after reading this. My husband is reading it now, he does not read much so this book has captured my construction worker husbands attention, He loves it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
a very insightful look and the lives of the blackfeet: the potent influence of both the spirit and the natural world intermingled with tradition, honor, and sacrifice. welch invokes an element of sadness upon his readers as he recounts the presence of the white men and women on the respected soil of the blackfeet indians. a very honest novel- the closest i have ever felt to undertanding this side to the history of the America's.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hated it. Maybe I'd appreciate it if I knew more about the Blackfeet but the book jumped around, left many things unexplained, and didnt seem to have much of a deeper meaning. The ending was really abrupt too.