Graveyard Shift: A Novel

Graveyard Shift: A Novel

by Michael F. Haspil

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Overview

Graveyard Shift: A Novel by Michael F. Haspil

Police procedurals go supernatural in this gritty urban fantasy debut by Michael F. Haspil in Graveyard Shift

“Part crime novel and part fantasy, Graveyard Shiftis a bloody good read.” — Booklist

Alex Menkaure, former pharaoh and mummy, and his vampire partner, Marcus are vice cops in a special Miami police unit, keeping the streets safe from supernatural threats.

When poisoned artificial blood drives vampires to murder, however, the city is pushed to the brink. Only an unlikely alliance with old enemies can give Alex and Marcus a fighting chance against an ancient vampire conspiracy.

If they succeed, they'll be hunted by everyone. If they fail, the result will be a war far bloodier than any the world has ever seen.

“Gritty urban fantasy and hard-boiled noir packed into a hand grenade of awesome!” —Mario Acevedo, author of Werewolf Smackdown

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765379634
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 08/14/2018
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 503,584
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

MICHAEL F. HASPIL is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, where he distinguished himself as an ICBM crew commander. After retiring from the military, he served as a launch director at Cape Canaveral. He has been writing original stories for as long as he can remember and has dabbled in many genres. Graveyard Shift is his first novel.

Customer Reviews

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Graveyard Shift 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
PenKay More than 1 year ago
I have been eyeing this book for a while and was really excited when it came up on NetGalley for review. As the publication date approached, I dived into the book. I really liked this book. It was a unique take on the paranormal mythology, the characters were all very interesting (I love when characters aren’t completely black and white), and the action was very fast-paced. Alex was a fascinating character, and he was so different than most characters in urban fantasy that he really stood out to me. I do have to point out I found the book at times to be a little wordy. I don’t mind descriptions, but when the descriptions get to be sentences long, I skip a little and end up missing some plot details. This is probably more a personal preference than a problem with the author. And, to be honest, sometimes the POV and time changes made it hard to keep track of what exactly was going on. However, these were minor things, and didn’t really detract much from the book. I am looking forward to reading more in this series (I hope there will be more) and can’t wait to see what’ll happen next. Recommend! Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for the e-copy of the book which I voluntarily reviewed.
Jazzie More than 1 year ago
I received a complementary copy from the author / publisher but all opinions are my own. Note: This review contains NO spoilers So... This was definitely a read that I got into! I was intrigued by the synopsis, especially it covered much of the paranormal/supernatural lore that I enjoy reading. The story is written in a police procedural style with the main characters as vice cops dealing with supernatural beings while solving/fighting crime. Kinda reminded me of Lethal Weapon, but, obviously, with a supernatural twist. This also gave me a Grimm-ish feel to it; however, Graveyard Shift was darker and grittier. Moreover, Michael F. Haspil made it work with this debut novel of his. The character development and world-building had a lot of depth and substance with all the descriptive writing. The book is told in the point of view (POV) of Alex and Marcus; however, there are also other characters' point of views told which connects to each other that is relevant to the storyline. At least, the various POVs are mostly separated by chapters that way it doesn't get too confusing. Well, if you don't pay attention, details and clues can be missed. So, yeah, there's a lot of twists to this case that Alex and Marcus is working on. I would have to say that the highlight(s) of this book is the incredible description of characters and setting; the consistency of story flow; the twists and turns that kept me guessing; and the action-packed scenes. However, the only thing that I could find is that the read slow to start, and the varying character POVs could be distracting. But, then again, those POVs are important in solving this mystery, especially when each of these POV is connected to each other one way or another. Well, other than that, I enjoyed this mystery. I can even see this turning into a whole series of Alex and Marcus' exploits as vice cops in Miami! Graveyard Shift is a gritty and dark police procedural with a supernatural twist that drags readers into the crime underworld they live in.
T_Knite More than 1 year ago
Graveyard Shift was a mishmash of tried-and-true urban fantasy tropes with a few unique twists thrown in. The plot of the story, although slow to pick up, was action-packed and increasingly fast-paced toward the end--which I liked. However, I thought the conclusion was a bit too open-ended, even for a series starter, and everything wrapped up a bit prematurely for my taste. The main characters, Alex and Marcus, were interesting and fun to follow, but I felt that too much of Alex's backstory was withheld, considering how many times it was referenced. I assume the author held it back to explore in a sequel, but I think we could have be given a few more key details without it completely unraveling a subsequent plotline. One of my biggest issues with the story was undoubtedly the writing style combined with the structure. Frankly, I think there were too many POV characters in the book. (The story jumps around to a lot of different people, most noticeably in the first half.) When you take into account that the overall writing style was heavy with exposition, and then add a higher-than-average number of POVs, you inevitably wind up with a story that feels much slower than it should. If the POV usage and style had been more streamlined, the pacing would have felt much less bogged down. Overall, this was a fine read, but I do think it could have better. [ I received an ARC of this title from the publisher via NetGalley. ]