A House Like a Lotus

A House Like a Lotus

by Madeleine L'Engle

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781466814134
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date: 02/14/2012
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 487,728
File size: 298 KB
Age Range: 12 - 18 Years

About the Author

MADELEINE L'ENGLE (1918-2007) was the author of more than forty books for readers of all ages, including the Newbery Medal winner A Wrinkle in Time, the Newbery Honor Book A Ring of Endless Light, and the first two books about Polly O'Keefe, The Arm of the Starfish and Dragons in the Waters.


Madeleine L'Engle (1918-2007) was the Newbery Medal-winning author of more than 60 books, including the much-loved A Wrinkle in Time. Born in 1918, L'Engle grew up in New York City, Switzerland, South Carolina and Massachusetts. Her father was a reporter and her mother had studied to be a pianist, and their house was always full of musicians and theater people. L'Engle graduated cum laude from Smith College, then returned to New York to work in the theater. While touring with a play, she wrote her first book, The Small Rain, originally published in 1945. She met her future husband, Hugh Franklin, when they both appeared in The Cherry Orchard. Upon becoming Mrs. Franklin, L'Engle gave up the stage in favor of the typewriter. In the years her three children were growing up, she wrote four more novels. Hugh Franklin temporarily retired from the theater, and the family moved to western Connecticut and for ten years ran a general store. Her book Meet the Austins, an American Library Association Notable Children's Book of 1960, was based on this experience. Her science fantasy classic A Wrinkle in Time was awarded the 1963 Newbery Medal. Two companion novels, A Wind in the Door and A Swiftly Tilting Planet (a Newbery Honor book), complete what has come to be known as The Time Trilogy, a series that continues to grow in popularity with a new generation of readers. Her 1980 book A Ring of Endless Light won the Newbery Honor. L'Engle passed away in 2007 in Litchfield, Connecticut.

Date of Birth:

January 12, 1918

Date of Death:

September 6, 2007

Place of Birth:

New York, NY

Place of Death:

Litchfield, CT

Education:

Smith College, 1941

Customer Reviews

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A House Like a Lotus 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a diehard L'Engle fan, but this is by far my favorite book. It is indeed a wonderful story and one I constantly read just to get into a deep story of attraction, emotion, and logic. The fantasy is there but so is reality. This book deals with real issues, and in a respectful way to all parties involved. And the scenes are treated with a delicate and enchanting sense. I couldn't put this book down when I first read it and I still haven't tucked it away on a bookshelf.
chewbecca on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
With the L'Engle books, I had rarely ventured from the Wrinkle in Time series, but when I finally read the inside cover and found that this book's main character was the daughter of the characters in the other books, I read it very quickly. L'Engle's coming-of-age books are absolutely amazing, and this one is no exception. I found myself never wanting to put it down and was highly disappointed when it came to an end. This is a great read for just about anyone, but female readers will most likely be able to relate more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like meg and charles wallace better
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She shook her head. No im sorry that i ever asked u. She pads back to camp.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
9855
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed L'Engle's treatment of the characters and message to allow complexity and imperfection in those around us
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book when I was 13 and going through a lot of family changes. I had read anything by her I could get my hands on and kept looking for more. This book literally turned a switch in my head. I 'got' so much that was going on in my life. I felt such a connection with Polly. It was so wonderful at a time when I felt so alone to read about someone I could relate to.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not L'Engle's BEST, but I love all of her books. This one I would recommend for young adults because of the very small and not very detailed sex scene. Also because the book deals with issues such as sexual harrassment, lesbianism, etc. P.S. The sex scene was not 'yucky.' Polly (the character in the book) is a natural, healthy teenager. The book was very realistic as far as that goes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this was such a wonderful book! i can't believe anyone would think anything else, but i have to admit that the sex scene was 'yucky' but that was the only bad thing. besides, it was over fast, and you need to look past that to the book as a whole. it was wonderful and i especially liked the diversity of it. that was good.
Guest More than 1 year ago
well, it's a great book full of traveling and adventure, but the feeling of the overall book is kind of strange. I loved the way l'engle put so many characters in the book and had Polly chillin with all her homies at different times. My favorite thing about the whole book was the description of the traveling and places Polly visited. I didn't like how she had sex with her boyfriend when she's at the lowest time in the story. It sends out a bad message. It was.....different.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A House Like A Lotus was absolutely wonderful!!! I love it so much, I read it five times! I love Polly and Zachary together. I wish there could be a book with them as a couple.
Guest More than 1 year ago
House Like a Lotus, like all of L'Engle's novels, definitely inspires learning and growth. The beautiful and poignant descriptions of Greece and Cyprus pale in comparison to the deapth and fullness of the characters. All ages can appreciate this book that, although grouped in the young adult genre, has themes and messages that address young and old alike.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think that this is one of the most wonderful books I have read. It is deeply profound and made me think about life and growing up. I love the whole Murray series, and L'Engle writes with a delicacy and eloquence that is rare.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first read House like a lotus probably 15 years ago, and since, I have read it at least 15 times (at the very least). Every time I read this book I take away something new and discover a little bit more about myself. The depth and growth of the characters never ceases to amaze me. I was a bit disconcerted about the negative review posted earlier. The one 'love scene' was probably one of the most understated and delicately describe ones I have ever read. It was not lewd or descriptive or in any way cheap. As for the subject matter of homosexuality that the book revolves around, I think it is done in a very thoughtful and tactful manner. I think the book is an excellent look in to a very personal lifestyle. I have known many gay and lesbian couples, and I think that loving, private and mature relationship portrayed is more accurate than any I have seen previous. I would definately recommend this book to any age, even young adult. It does not glamourize sex, promiscuity or homosexuality. It does give a compassionate and thoughtful look at them as it shows a young girls travels through emotional growth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go back 1 result
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im bored................
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
R u single from savannah
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No girls to date so bad
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been fortunate enough to read many L'Engle works in my time but never had I read one work twice until I picked up House Like A Lotus. I was taken by the discriptive characterizations of not only Polly but her family as well as the colorful way that the setting were described. As far as this "sex secene" is concerned, I think that this is a coming of age book. With the coming of age, there are certain "truthes" about the world that young people must embrace. Sexuality is one of those such thruthes. I think that L'Engle approaches these oft time sensative issues with a great deal of honesty and openness. She is not judegemental nor does she force her opinion on the reader. In the development of the plot, she allows the reader to formulate their own opinion. The intimate moment that was shared by Polly and her boyfriend was as tender a moment as you can get in any medium.I think it should be taken as it was given,as a tender moment shared by two concenting adults. As far as the homosexuality, that particular lifestyle is in this world. There is no denying that. The exchange between Max and Polly and the relationship between Max and her partner are not overt and that too should be taken as it was presented to us, as the reader, by the author. This book was a phenominal read and I would recommend it to anyone in the age group of 13 and above.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I first put this book down I was MAD!! I'm a really big L'Engle fan and this was the book only book og hers I hadn't finished but the ending seemed to go against all veiws presnted in L'Engles other novels. But the book made me think. And it made me ask a lot of good questions. And I think those questions are why she wrote the book. The book comes from the point of veiw of Polly, who makes a lot of mistakes thru out the whole book. But the mistakes cause the questions. The main questions from the book deal with: lesbianism, (subtly) pre-marital sex, and the imperfections of all Humans.