Incriminating Dating

Incriminating Dating

by Rebekah L. Purdy
4.1 7

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Overview

Incriminating Dating by Rebekah L. Purdy

Opinionated, unconventional Ayla Hawkins isn’t the type to use blackmail, but sometimes a girl has to stand up for what’s right. So when she catches Mr. Perfect Luke Pressler doing something decidedly un-perfect, Ayla’s got the dirt she needs to get Luke on her side—in the form of her new fake boyfriend.

One mistake. All Luke wanted was a night to goof off, to blow off steam. The next thing he knew, he was pretending to date Ayla Hawkins. But his little blackmailer turns out to be kind. Honorable. And just the breath of fresh air he didn’t even realize he was suffocating for. But Luke and Ayla come from different worlds, and once the terms of their agreement end, their fauxmance will, too.

Disclaimer: This Entangled Teen Crush book features adult language, sexual situations, and plenty of girl power. Reading may result in swooning, laughing, and looking for a Luke of your own.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781633759268
Publisher: Entangled Publishing, LLC
Publication date: 04/10/2017
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 150
Sales rank: 175,639
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 12 Years

About the Author

Rebekah was born and raised in Michigan where she spent many late nights armed with a good book and a flashlight. She’s lived in Michigan most of her life other than the few years she spent in the U.S. Army. Rebekah currently works full time for the court system. In her free time she writes YA stories, anything from YA Fantasy to YA Contemporary Romance. Rebekah also has a big family (6 kids)—she likes to consider her family as the modern day Brady Bunch complete with crazy road trips and game nights.

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Incriminating Dating 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review. Thanks to Entangled Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review Incriminating Dating by Rebekah L. Purdy. Ayla's point of view alternates with Luke's point of view throughout the story. Ayla is a good student that minds her own business and doesn't like to make waves. That changes when funds are being cut for drama and the school paper; the activities she participates in. Luke looks like a normal popular high school guy but he struggles with poverty and a dysfunctional family and he has only one true friend that he feels like he can confide in. Ayla decides to run for class office to make a difference but she's taking on the entire school culture when she runs. Luke and Ayla build a relationship under interesting circumstances, but sometimes that's the only way to find out who your true friends are. 4 stars for this realistic fiction story geared towards young adults who want to see fairness in the world a little more often!
etoile1996 More than 1 year ago
ayla hawkins believes in causes. she believes in standing up for what is right. she's a proud drama club member, reporter for the school paper, and pizza fan. in incriminating dating, she accidentally catches star basketball player, luke pressler vandalizing a public park with his friends. they are drunk and stupid and rich and entitled. and ayla has no problem sharing the video of their actions with the authorities, except she's running against the super popular jenna for student body president, and she could use a little help. so she makes a deal with luke. if he pretends to be her boyfriend and helps her with her campaign, she'll delete the video. luke has a scholarship to the university of michigan that would be endangered if ayla shares the video. he could be suspended from school or off the team. so he agrees to ayla's terms. and in spite of what ayla thinks of him, he's actually a pretty good guy. in fact, ayla only learns as she gets to know him, but his circumstances are so far from what she assumed they were. he lives in a seedy part of town, his mom is absent or drunk on a good day, he has no contact with his father or that side of the family, he works long hours to help supplement his mother's income, he studies late into the night because there is no other time to do it, and he often is left to watch his younger brother because he's the only one able to pick up the slack. as ayla and luke get to know each other better, they each come to understand what has shaped their points of view. ayla shows luke that while he's basically a good person, he can stand to speak up when things are not right more often. people see him as a leader, so when his friends are being jerks and he says nothing it looks like he is part of the problem. and ayle learns that not all things are what they appear. everyone has a story and you can't trust your first impressions and think you know everything based on limited information. ayla and luke go through some pretty major stuff, some of it life-changing. learning to rely on others and opening up about their problems are some of the life lessons that they both need to acquire in order to come through everything together. it's a bumpy road and they are teenagers, so things get pretty dramatic, but it also works out perfectly in the end. as always, communication is key. one of the best things that incriminating dating does is it lets us really get to know who ayla and luke are as they are getting to know each other. it's almost as if they had been defining themselves by how other saw them or who others assumed they were. but when ayla and luke are together, they are their real selves. they start out thinking the worst of one another, only to find that maybe this person they've thought so badly of, is actually pretty wonderful. **incrminating dating will publish on april 10, 2017. i received an advance reader copy courtesy of netgalley/entangled publishing (crush) in exchange for my honest review.
Laura_F More than 1 year ago
This YA fake relationship story was so sweet and adorable! Ayla and Luke have attended school together since kindergarten but they have completely different groups of friends and really don't know each other at all. When Ayla sees Luke defacing statues in their town, it gives her the opportunity to blackmail him into helping her win the election for class president so she can save the non-sports related extracurriculars. Once these two really get to know each other, they realize that they have so much more in common than they thought they would. But the plan is to end their "relationship" when the election is over. Will they keep their plan or try to turn their fauxmance into a romance? Ayla was such an awesome character. For a high school senior, she has clear plans and a solid self image. She stands up for other people and is one of the most selfless characters I've read in a long time. Luke has the strength to carry the world on his shoulders, which he often needs to do. It was great to see him opening himself up to Ayla and finally catching a break. This book deals with some intense themes but was able to show how a great support system can change outcomes. There were so many great characters in this book that I read through it in one sitting! *This is my voluntary review of an advanced reader copy*
Suze-Lavender More than 1 year ago
Ayla always stands up for the people who need it. She genuinely cares about fellow students, important issues and school clubs for everyone. She wants her voice to be heard, which is why she's in the running to become Senior Class President. Her opponent fights dirty, so Ayla needs a little extra popularity on her side. When she catches a few basketball stars doing something they shouldn't have done, she uses it to her advantage and blackmails one of them, Luke. Luke knows he's done something risky and stupid, just to feel free for a while. Being caught could cost him his entire future. He hopes that nobody has witnessed the incident, but when Ayla approaches Luke to tell him what she saw, he realizes she has a lot of power over him. Luke has to date her to make her more popular. That way she will reach more people and can give all the students at school a voice, not just the jocks and cheerleaders. Luke reluctantly agrees. Ayla isn't the type of girl he usually dates, but when he gets to know her better he finds out he likes her a lot. She might have blackmailed him, but she doesn't make demands and is actually really nice to him. Luke doesn't have any trouble to make his fake relationship believable. Will Ayla get what she wants and will Luke's scholarship stay safe? Will they come out unscathed or will both Luke and Ayla end up with a broken heart? Incriminating Dating is a great story about two teenagers from very different backgrounds who have much more in common than they initially thought. Luke's life is all about pretending and with Ayla he can be himself. That was endearing to see. His home situation is difficult and reading about his crazy schedule brought tears to my eyes. Ayla's much happier at home than Luke, but at school she doesn't have such a good time. She has a wonderful best friend, but she's being bullied and censored. I loved how strong she is. She stands up for herself and for others and she shows her bravery over and over again. She's honest and she doesn't hide behind an image, what you see is what you get. I immediately loved her. She's fun, enjoys the good things in life and she's smart and creative. At first it seems like they're opposites, but when she gets to know the real Luke, the way he is outside school, things change. She's actually perfect for him. Luke is caring and sweet. He's responsible and works hard. He has quite a few problems, but is always there for his little brother and Ayla takes some of the weight off his shoulders. Luke actually cares about her campaign and does everything he can to help. Those things were both amazing to witness. Luke and Ayla are beautiful people inside and out and it's what I liked the most about their story. Rebekah L. Purdy writes about keeping up appearances, struggling, having too much responsibility and bullying in a fabulous empathic way. Ayla is Luke's rock and Luke gives Ayla confidence, which is something precious. Their connection is genuine and very special. At first their conversations are uneasy, but soon they find out they can talk about anything and I loved how Rebekah L. Purdy handles this transition. She's written a terrific meaningful romantic story with plenty of depth.
onemused More than 1 year ago
“Incriminating Dating” was a really cute book that follows two high school seniors, Ayla and Luke. We bounce back and forth between their two perspectives, which works out perfectly. Ayla is pretty much the opposite of Luke. She is nerdy with Star Wars themed purses, working on the school newspaper and auditioning for the school musical. She’s pretty unpopular and gets teased for her weight. However, she’s happy with who she is and can handle the heat. Her senior year is off to a rocky start- the budget for drama has been halved from its already pitiful amount, and the newspaper is on the verge of getting cut entirely- all to feed into the sports teams. Her BFF Chloe comes up with a plan to save the budgets- if Ayla gets elected Senior Class President, she can influence the school board into hopefully sharing the wealth a bit more equally. Ayla just found out her article on transgender rights is cut, and the principal wants her to do an interview with the star of the basketball team, Luke. Although she is upset about it, she has to play by the rules. On her way home, she catches Luke and some of his friends defacing some public statues. She records it, considering using it for her article. When Luke stands her up for the interview, she runs into him at the pizza place where he works and comes up with a new plan- she’ll blackmail him into helping her get elected to President. His popularity would be sure to bump her social standing up a few notches and help her case. Luke is the popular jock, but he’s struggling at home. He lives with his mother and little brother, Landon. His mother works two jobs and Landon works every hour he can to help support their family. Landon’s mother has a bad habit of coming home drunk and yelling at him. We are first introduced when she calls and asks him to skip his last few classes to go pick up his sick brother from school. Luke knows he needs the scholarship for basketball to go to college the next year- he can’t afford for Ayla’s tape to come out and ruin his future. When the two collide, they learn more about each other than they would have thought, and the blackmail starts to seem like more of a catalyst for a wonderful relationship than a burden. The book takes some unexpected twists and turns, and I absolutely loved it. There are some big themes of neglect, abandonment and abuse, but nothing gets too out of hand, and things are handled well by the surrounding characters (good examples are set). This was a really lovely story and I really enjoyed it. I loved that they were not your typical high school couple and their whole journey from blackmailer/blackmailee to friends and to maybe something more. It’s a very well-written story and it is almost impossible to put down. I really enjoyed it and would highly recommend it for any lovers of clean YA romance. Please note that I received an ARC from the publisher through netgalley. All opinions are my own.
MeganPegasus More than 1 year ago
I instantly fell in love with this cute little contemporary romance. While the premise may sound overdone and clichéd, this book is filled with such fun, relatable characters and just the perfect amount of quirkiness that it completely avoids falling prey to the trope. Contemporary romance is not normally my favorite to read but every so often I find one that is so well-done that I fall in love with it. This is one of them. (And I’ve already read it twice). I really loved the characters that are featured in this book. Ayla is such a relatable and genuine character that I feel many readers will connect with her. With her nerdy interests that include Doctor Who, Zelda, and Minecraft, and her obsession with her favorite food of pizza, she’s not the typical YA main character. I also love that Ayla is plus-sized and embraces herself for who she is and never lets it hold her back. She is certainly a character that I would find myself friends with. I loved getting to know Luke as he revealed the true circumstances of his life. That he’s not just some jock with an easy life with rich parents, but instead struggles to help feed his divorced mom and brother while keeping his grades up and performing well in basketball. Instead of the typical jock, we get to see someone who is just barely holding it together and feels like they have to put up a façade to fit in, just like so many other high schoolers. While the focus of the story is on the romance, there’s certainly some real issues that are touched on in this book and I really appreciated that. I also found the writing style and pacing to be extremely engaging and finished this book in two days. While I normally don’t care for alternating points of view in books, Purdy did such an amazing job with it that I loved the alternating chapters between Ayla and Luke. Both characters had unique voices and I loved getting to see how each of their opinions changed about the other as the book went on. The chapters also flowed together seamlessly so I never found myself irritated with being taken from an engaging event to something else in other author’s attempts in creating suspense. Overall, the writing style and plot were just done so well. There’s also a nice small-town feel to the book with the characters going on hayrides and making smores by the fire which was a fun aspect. There are definitely some typical YA tropes in this book but overall I loved the romance so much in this that it didn’t hinder my enjoyment of it at all. Basically if you’re looking for the next cute contemporary romance must-read, this is it. While it does come with the disclaimer of adult language and sexual situations, I personally feel that there didn’t need to be a disclaimer for sexual situations since they are very minor. The adult language though? Yeah, that’s fitting. If you get any amount of enjoyment out of contemporary romances, pick this book up. You won’t regret it. *I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review*
Sweety_LittleVoids More than 1 year ago
"Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review" Okay, the story is simple and it follows the standard formula - Geek blackmails Jock -Fake Relationship - Falling for each other -Some twist - All is well that ends well. The author has followed the formula to the T. So about the characters - Ayla Hawkins - a geek who runs the school paper as well as a main part of drama club is outraged that the school has cut off funds to art clubs and instead increases funding to sports. She comes off like a geek-rebel but she keeps saying she is just a bystander who normally doesn't talk much. She says she hates the rich families and their kids who act like everything is under their disposal, but she isn't poor, mind you! She has tree (boat?!) house that looks bigger than Luke Pressler's house. So I found it hard connecting to her. Luke Pressler - popular jock, putting up a pretense in school that he is still rich and lives in big mansions. But inside he is raging and trying to cool off his hatred towards his dad for forsaking them, and in a moment of rage vandalizes public property. But otherwise, he is responsible big brother to Landon, takes care of him and helps his mom in paying bills. The fauxmance turning to romance is predictable but I did enjoy it. All through the book, I was waiting for the video to go into the wrong hands. Because, duh the formula! I'm being honest here and will list out the things that I liked and disliked. I liked that Ayla stood for many causes but resorting to blackmail was beneath her. Like she should have just asked Luke to help with her campaign , why particularly to be a boyfriend. There's a confusion to most of the characters - Luke's mom is first portrayed differently, so I'm not able to digest how things turn out eventually. The number of times the characters repeat something about themselves. Like Luke, stressing so many times that he is paying the bills or how Ayla stresses multiple times about jocks and all popular kids being judgmental jerks. Or Jack and Jenna's "you're going down!" I liked that Ayla was curvy and was confident about her appearance, and doesn't mind stuffing herself with pizza. I loved Landon