Intonation

Intonation

by Alan Cruttenden

Hardcover(REV)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780521591829
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 11/30/2009
Series: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics Series
Edition description: REV
Pages: 220
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgementsxi
Prefacexiii
Transcriptionsxv
1Preliminaries1
1.1Prosodic features1
1.1.1Length, loudness, and pitch2
1.1.1.1Length2
1.1.1.2Loudness2
1.1.1.3Pitch3
1.1.1.4Summary5
1.2Auditory and instrumental5
1.3Prominence6
1.4Intonation7
1.5Tone languages8
1.6Pitch accent languages10
1.7Summary12
Sources and further reading12
2Stress, Accent, and Rhythm13
2.1Stress and accent13
2.2Word-stress14
2.2.1English word-stress15
2.3Degrees of stress/accent17
2.4Rhythm20
2.5Prosodic hierarchies22
2.6Summary25
Sources and further reading25
3The Forms of Intonation26
3.1The historical background to intonational studies26
3.2Intonation-groups29
3.2.1Pause30
3.2.2Other boundary markers32
3.2.3Internal structure as group marker35
3.2.4Problems in group delimitation35
3.3Contours and levels38
3.4Pitch accents and cleus40
3.5Accent range, key, and register44
3.6Whole tunes and nuclear tones47
3.7English nuclear tones50
3.8Pre-nuclear pitch accents54
3.9Alternatives to nuclear tones55
3.9.1Autosegmental approaches (1)56
3.9.2Autosegmental approaches (2)59
3.10Summary and preview66
Sources and further reading66
4The Functions of Intonation68
4.1Introduction68
4.2Intonation-groups68
4.3Nucleus placement73
4.3.1Broad focus74
4.3.2Narrow focus80
4.3.3New and old information81
4.3.3.1Contrastivity82
4.3.3.2Echoes84
4.3.3.3Insists85
4.3.4'Normal stress'86
4.4English nuclear tones87
4.4.1Local meanings91
4.4.1.1Falls91
4.4.1.2Rises (dependent)93
4.4.1.3Rises (independent)97
4.4.1.4Tonal sequences103
4.4.2Conditioning factors104
4.4.3Abstract meanings106
4.4.3.1A two-tone approach106
4.4.3.2A three-tone approach108
4.4.3.3A compositional approach110
4.4.4Tonal features114
4.4.4.1Accent range115
4.4.4.2Complexity117
4.4.4.3Stylisation119
4.4.4.4Declination and downstep120
4.5Key and register123
4.6Summary125
Sources and further reading125
5Comparative Intonation128
5.1Introduction128
5.2Style, class, and sex128
5.3Dialectal variation131
5.3.1British English133
5.3.2Variation in English dialects outside Britain136
5.4Cross-linguistic comparisons138
5.4.1Comparative intonation-groupings139
5.4.2Comparative nucleus placement139
5.4.3Comparative tone: alternative models144
5.4.4Comparative tone: basic typology149
5.4.4.1Declaratives151
5.4.4.2Yes/no interrogatives155
5.4.4.3Question word interrogatives159
5.4.4.4Imperatives and exclamatives160
5.4.4.5Pre-nuclear accents160
5.4.4.6Stereotyped patterns and chants161
5.5Intonational universals161
5.5.1Declination162
5.5.2Tonal universals163
5.6Intonational change164
5.7Intonation acquisition166
5.8Summary169
Sources and further reading169
6Conspectus172
6.1Prosodic, paralinguistic, and extralinguistic172
6.1.1Prosodic features173
6.1.2Paralinguistic effects174
6.2Intonation and punctuation175
6.3Intonation and gesture177
6.4State-of-the-art178
Sources and further reading178
References180
Index197

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