Le Morte D'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table

Le Morte D'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table

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Overview

Le Morte D'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table by Thomas Malory

From the incredible wizadry of Merlin to the passion of Gwynevere and Sir Lancelot, these tales of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table offer epic adventures with the supernatural as well as timeless battles with our own humanity.

In a time when there were damsels in distress to save and mythical dragons to slay, King Arthur and his knights were there to render justice in the face of any danger. 

Keith Baine's splendid rendition of Le Morte d'Arthur faithfully preserves the original flavor of Malory's masterpiece—that of banners and bloodshed, knights and ladies, Christians and sorcerers, sentiment and savagery. It remains a vivid medieval tapestry woven about a central figure who symbolizes the birth of an age of chivalry.

Includes an Introduction by Robert Graves and an Afterword by Christopher Cannon

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451531490
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/02/2010
Pages: 576
Sales rank: 198,896
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Sir Thomas Malory was born in approximately 1410 and is believed to have been a knight serving under the Earl of Warwick.  For a few years he was a member of Parliament but ultimately spent several long terms in prison for a variety of crimes, including robbery and assault. He completed Le Morte d’Arthur, the first great English prose epic, in Newgate Prison around 1469-70, shortly before his death. The book was eventually published in 1485 by William Caxton, the first English printer.
 
Keith Baines was born in London, England. He studied at private schools in London and Hampshire, at the Royal Academy of Music, and at University College, London. He fought in World War II, and after his discharge, he turned to his main interest, poetry. Mr. Baines’s poems appeared in periodicals both in the United States and the United Kingdom. He died in 1986.

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Le Morte D'Arthur 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
First off, before I begin, I must state that the other review of this book is actually for a different edition, specifically the Signet Classics Edition edited by Keith Barnes. This book is the Norton Critical Edition, edited by Stephen H. Shepherd, and as such is one of the most accurate translations of the Le Morte D'Arthur I have seen in some time. It is especially good for use in research papers, as I can attest to from experience. Being meant for research, this book is not intended for anyone who wants a basic introduction to Malory or the Le Morte D'Arthur. The majority of the Middle English spelling conventions have remained intact in this volume, although it is important to note that some spelling has been still altered (as the editor makes clear in the introduction). Thus, a good knowledge of Middle English is necessary before attempting to read this for one's personal pleasure. The editor does some more things which try to keep this volume as close to the original mauscript as possible. One example of this is the line heights. If a sentence was written three lines high in the manuscript, it is printed three lines high in this edition. Items such as this combine to create an edition that is as close as a reader can get to the original Winchester Manuscript without looking at a fascimile of it. Although this edition is overwhelmingly based on the Winchester Manuscript, some portions of the Caxton printing have made their way into this volume, seen in places where the Winchester Manuscript was missing pages (such as the beginning) or was otherwise lacking. The influence of the Caxton printing is rather minimal, but in some areas this edition has to be considered a blend of the two. In addition to the story itself, there are a number of essays and other sources present at the end of the book which can help in research or in putting this tale and its author into perspective. Thus, in total, this would be the only version of Le Morte D'Arthur which I would ever use for research or for scholarly writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Knights and dragons, sorcerers and kings, romance and betrayal, blood and guts...there's something of interest for everyone in Malory's story. This book is about the legendary life and acts of King Arthur and the life and struggles of his active family of chivalrous knights. While enjoying the frenetic adventures of Lancelot, Galahad, King Arthur, and Guinevere, many aspects of everyday life in early medieval times are glimpsed, in particular an absorbing overview of the code of chivalry. It's a fascinating journey of knightly heroes struggling to follow the dichotomy of the code of chivalry that calls for heroic military strength balanced by Christian ideals. Lancelot, as the main catalyst of the story, and the 'flower of all knights,' is a symbol of every human--flawed, yet struggling to better himself despite outside temptations. Arthur, on the other hand, is the ultimate symbol of goodness, loyalty, and bravery within the code of chivalry. His Round Table is called the 'flower of chivalry,' although as a result of his total faith in loyalty and honor Arthur is all too trusting of his friends and family. He and his Round Table are the heart of the story, but his fellowship of knights is shaken because of the loss of trust resulting from the adultery of Lancelot and Guinevere. Malory utilizes an effective, yet simple technique of grouping short prose stories with unusal titles such as 'How at night came an armed knight, and fought with Sir Gareth, and he, sore hurt in the thigh, smote off the knight's head,' into a sequential story line. The brevity of each story and the eye-catching titles break up the tediousness of interpreting the old Anglo-Saxon vocabulary. Words such as 'brain-pan' (skull), 'orgulity' (pride), and 'gramercy' (many thanks), are difficult to interpret, but the reader is assisted by a short glossary of terms found at the end of each volume. These stories are grouped into twenty-one books, ranging from the marriage of Arthur and Guinevere, to the story of Lancelot and his search for the Holy Grail, to the final book, detailing the death of King Arthur and the lamentable collapse of the Round Table.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The preview of the book includes none of the actual book and only part of the introduction. Years ago B&N screwed me with an expensive version of the original public domain Mort D'Arthur. They never did anything to esolve it so now i have only previews to trust
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This only has one book of the entire text. So it is not something that I would recommend.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Oh, how I love, thee, Malory! This is a collectors' edition of the classic tale. The illustrations are beatiful (though I think Waterhouse does a better job at capturing the spirit of the legend) and it is a pleasure to read the classics in nicely bound books rather than decaying paperbacks. I recommend this book only for Arthurian purists as it is unabridged and contains no commentaries to aid the amateur reader.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
At least attempt modernization
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is Vol. 2.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Banned