Olive, Again

Olive, Again

by Elizabeth Strout

NOOK Book(eBook)

$13.99 View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Overview

#1 New York Times bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout continues the life of her beloved Olive Kitteridge, a character who has captured the imaginations of millions.

“Strout managed to make me love this strange woman I’d never met, who I knew nothing about. What a terrific writer she is.”—Zadie Smith, The Guardian


NAMED ONE OF FALL’S MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS BY PeopleTimeEntertainment WeeklyVanity FairBuzzFeedVogueUSA Today • The Seattle TimesHuffPostNewsdayVultureBustleVoxPopSugarGood HousekeepingLitHubBook Riot
 
Prickly, wry, resistant to change yet ruthlessly honest and deeply empathetic, Olive Kitteridge is “a compelling life force” (San Francisco Chronicle). The New Yorker has said that Elizabeth Strout “animates the ordinary with an astonishing force,” and she has never done so more clearly than in these pages, where the iconic Olive struggles to understand not only herself and her own life but the lives of those around her in the town of Crosby, Maine. Whether with a teenager coming to terms with the loss of her father, a young woman about to give birth during a hilariously inopportune moment, a nurse who confesses a secret high school crush, or a lawyer who struggles with an inheritance she does not want to accept, the unforgettable Olive will continue to startle us, to move us, and to inspire moments of transcendent grace.

Advance praise for Olive, Again

“There’s no simple truth about human existence, Strout reminds us, only wonderful, painful complexity. ‘Well, that’s life,’ Olive says. ‘Nothing you can do about it.’ Beautifully written and alive with compassion, at times almost unbearably poignant. A thrilling book in every way.”Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Strout’s stories form a cohesive novel, both sequel and culmination, that captures, with humor, compassion, and embarrassing detail, aging, loss, loneliness, and love. Strout again demonstrates her gift for zeroing in on ordinary moments in the lives of ordinary people to highlight their extraordinary resilience.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780812996555
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/15/2019
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 43
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Elizabeth Strout is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Olive Kitteridge, winner of the Pulitzer Prize; Anything Is Possible, her most recent book and winner of The Story Prize; My Name Is Lucy Barton, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize; The Burgess Boys, named one of the best books of the year by The Washington Post and NPR; Abide with Me, a national bestseller; and Amy and Isabelle, winner of the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction and the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize. She has also been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the International Dublin Literary Award, and the Orange Prize. Her short stories have been published in a number of magazines, including The New Yorker. Elizabeth Strout lives in New York City.

Hometown:

Brooklyn, New York

Date of Birth:

January 6, 1956

Place of Birth:

Portland, Maine

Education:

B.A., Bates College, 1977; J.D., Syracuse College of Law, 1982

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Olive, Again: A Novel 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
paigereadsthepage 3 days ago
The main character, Olive, picks up shortly after where she left off in the previous novel, Olive Kitteridge. While this is the second novel in the series, it can easily be read as a standalone because she recaps the main events that happened in the first novel. However, I recommend reading the first novel in order to appreciate some of the returning characters. Life’s transitions, juxtapositions, and troubles are celebrated through Olive and the other characters. I found the last half of the novel to be extremely emotional. Olive is reaching a fragile point in her life and begins to calculate its significance and purpose. What makes a full life? As Olive ages, she continues to engage in the boulevard of life while trying to amount her existence. In Olive, Again there are thirteen short stories. Out of the 13 short stories, 5 of those are Olive’s direct story. In the remaining 8 stories, Olive makes an appearance in some shape or form. Each short story relates to the central theme of the novel to some degree and occur near or in the setting of Maine. Topics include suicide, sexual freedom, family, adultery, and aging. I love Olive, Again and recommend to lovers of literary sagas and contemporary fiction . Thank you to Elizabeth Strout, Random House, and NetGalley for a copy. Opinions are my own.
Anonymous 5 hours ago
I waited for this book,only to find I prefer the first centered around Olive.
Dogs-love2read2 1 days ago
What a wonderful book. I'm surprised to find out the title of Olive, Again is due to an earlier book by Ms Strout called Olive Kitteridge. Now, I want to read her first book. The characters are well developed and interesting. The story development is unique and once I was two chapters in I wanted to keep reading. I recommend this book to anyone who likes good writing. It was a pleasure to read. I received an Advanced Reader's Copy from Elizabeth Strout and Random House through NetGalley. The opinions expressed are completely my own. #Olive,Again #NetGalley
TJReads 1 days ago
Before I go any further, I want to say, I have Olive Kitteridge in my library but hadn’t read it yet. That being said, maybe this book would have made more sense if I had. I was so looking forward to this read and was excited when NetGalley and the publisher gave me the opportunity. And with all the glowing reviews, I had truly expected more. I do have several of Elizabeth’s other books in my library and even with this disappointment, I am looking very forward to reading them. This book is a menagerie of several small stories, other than Olive’s, and they just didn’t relate to the plot. A couple were way out there with sexual scenes that didn’t make much sense and probably could have been left out, in fact I found them kind of weird. I tried my best to fall in love with Olive but it just didn’t happen, even though there were several scenes that were enjoyable with her peculiar ways. Towards the end I felt the story was trying to redeem itself but it was almost too little too late. If I had read Olive Kitteridge first, maybe that would have helped, but unfortunately, I didn’t. This was a very disappointing book for what I was expecting. I thank Random House Publishing Group and NetGalley for the privilege of reading this for my honest unbiased review. Unfortunately, the best I can do is 3 stars.
Clarita 2 days ago
What a great character Olive is and one that I think many older people can identify with. Not necessarily being like her in that she was often brusque and unfriendly and believed she wasn’t a good mother to her son, but how introspective she was. The story actually starts with Jack, a rich guy who lost his wife only months ago and ponders what to do. He is lonely. He has one daughter who “doesn’t like him” and he admits he was not a good father. Similarly Olive has lost her Henry. She has one son Steven who she says doesn’t like her. She wanders around her house wondering what on earth she is going to do now. They meet, Jack eager to get together, Olive resisting, reluctant, but finally decides loneliness is not for her. In their eighties, a delightful union of two onerous old people, but happy to have each other’s company. They talk about what they could, should and wished they had done in the past, and also make an attempt to talk to their children. I particularly liked the last chapters in Olive’s life and I recommend you all get to read them. A thought provoking book.
JillB1 2 days ago
Welcome back, Olive. I have spent many hours wondering how you were, what you were doing and whose business you were getting into ...and now we discover that you have been busy. Older, wiser, more determined. Oh how I love you Olive and I can read about you again and again. Astonishing, outstanding and wonderful beyond words.
4GranJan 2 days ago
Political Stereotyping Ruined This Book This book is an interesting study in the life of a woman and the lives of women in general. This is not a 'feel-good' story. It is more than a little depressing. There was no closure to anything in this book. I kept thinking that it would get better or have a point. And then the book went all political. It was spouting political rhetoric and had all sorts of evil political prejudice. I read books for entertainment if I had wanted political bashing I could watch the news. I almost stopped reading it right there I should have. This book was a waste of time. I received this ARC book for free from Net Galley and this is my honest review.
ColoradoGirl71 2 days ago
5 reverent stars Elizabeth Strout has penned a stunning tale and I fell in love with Olive Kitteridge all over again. Yup, this one was so well written that I just marvel again at Elizabeth Strout. I’m at a loss to describe exactly how she does it, but she puts me squarely into the lives of Olive and other residents in Crosby, Maine. This is certainly not a “feel-good romantic comedy” I would almost liken it to a foreign language film – the kind that doesn’t have a Hollywood happy ending. There are chapters that paint vivid pictures of some people in town and Olive plays a role, sometimes a small one, in their stories. As in most towns, there are people grappling with grief, loneliness, failing health, alcoholism, and mental health. Olive finds love again and comes to make some hard realizations about her life and how she’s treated some people. I find her relationship with her son fascinating. She ages during the course of the story and has some medical problems and I thought Strout did an excellent job with this part of the story. I took my time and savored this story. Olive is one of those brutally honest people, but of course, now I picture her as Frances McDormand, thanks to the HBO series. I definitely recommend reading the first book to fully appreciate this one.
Kacey14 2 days ago
Rating: 4.5 stars rounded down to 4 stars This is Elizabeth Strout’s second installment in the ‘Olive Kitteridge’ series. Like the first book it’s a collection of related short stories centered around small town life in Crosby, Maine. In the eleven years since ‘Olive Kitteridge’ was published and the 10 years since it won the Pulitzer Prize, the author has gone on to write other fabulous books. However, even as I read those other books, once in awhile I would wonder what was going on in Crosby. This book sets out to answer that question. It’s not required that you read ‘Olive Kitteridge’ before this book. But I think it does add background and depth to some of the stories. In ‘Olive, Again’ we meet some of the characters from the first book, and plenty of new characters. Strout’s strength is capturing the both the outward physicality of life, and the inner mental voice that provides the soundtrack to the outward manifestation. She portrays how Olive has aged. How she's grown mellower in some aspects and sharper in others. I enjoyed meeting the most of the old and new characters. Some stories were sad yet compelling, showing how people often lead lives of ‘quiet desperation’. The beauty of the writing lets you come to those conclusions yourself without the author having to explicitly state it. Elizabeth Strout is a writer who gets you to care about the characters and the minutia of their days and years. She shows how people are so alike in some ways, and yet so different in others. This is a lovely book which I suspect may end up in the running for a Pulitzer Prize. ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Random House Publishing Group – Random House; and the author, Elizabeth Strout; for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
sjillis 2 days ago
Delightfully acerbic Olive Kitteridge is somewhat mellowed by age in this sequel to the eponymous work. Olive, Again is also a series of interconnected short stories featuring Olive, Crosby, Maine, or characters from Strout’s various works. While Olive has retained her blunt, outspoken—and sometimes ornery—ways, she has been gentled by loss and the realization that she may have driven some (e.g., her only son) away with her forthrightness. Her underlying kindness is very much evident in this new book, which is less about Olive and Henry (who is, after all, dead) and more about community, and caring for those who are part of your community, whether or not you agree with them, or even like them. Beautifully written, occasionally heart wrenching, and frequently hilarious, Olive, Again is in my opinion, even better than the Pulitzer Prize-winning Olive Kitteridge. #NetGalley #OliveAgain
Gailfl 2 days ago
Olive, Again. I love that title. It says it all. Olive is a retired 7th grade math teacher living in a small town in Maine. In her blunt, unapologetic manner Olive blazes through life. Some would say she takes no prisoners. Her relationships to family, friends, students and townspeople are detailed in both books: Olive Kitteridge covers 30 years of her life through vignettes—some about Olive, some where she has a minor role. Strout uses the same format for Olive, Again. Olive has aged. She may have softened somewhat. She still has her hard edges and her reputation abides, but Olive’s introspective thoughts have her examining her relationships. “She had been lucky, she supposed. She had been loved by two men, and that had been a luck thing; without luck, why would they have loved her? But they had. And her son seemed to have come around. It was herself, she realized, that did not please her. . .But it was too late to be thinking about that—” Olive’s reflective thoughts are the same that many of my fellow baby boomers share—the joys, the sorrows, the what-ifs and the if-I-had-onlys. I am glad that she shared hers with me. So glad that I think I need to reread the first book. “I do not have a clue who I have been. Truthfully, I do not understand a thing.” ----Olive Kitteridge Olive, Again My thanks to Netgalley and Penguin Random House for an advance reader copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Reader4102 3 days ago
I did not find Olive to be either direct or funny as some reviewers have stated. I found her to be rude, bitter, curmudgeonly, and, sadly, unable to relate to others even in the most basic ways. Because of the latter, she lives a lonely life because no one likes her, not even her family. This is well-written, but with an unlikable main character, the book was not saved by the writing. If you like novels featuring a sad, stereotypical elderly woman, then this novel is for you. It was just not my cup of tea. My thanks to Random House and NetGalley for an eARC.
Reader4102 3 days ago
I did not find Olive to be either direct or funny as some reviewers have stated. I found her to be rude, bitter, curmudgeonly, and, sadly, unable to relate to others even in the most basic ways. Because of the latter, she lives a lonely life because no one likes her, not even her family. This is well-written, but with an unlikable main character, the book was not saved by the writing. If you like novels featuring a sad, stereotypical elderly woman, then this novel is for you. It was just not my cup of tea. My thanks to Random House and NetGalley for an eARC.
CRSK 3 days ago
Olive has not changed much since I last spent time in her company, she is still the same opinionated, domineering, judgmental, interfering and needy woman, but time has passed. Time without her husband, Henry, whose quiet, gentle ways and willingness to see the good in people no longer softened the bitterness in their home since his passing, but it is also only in his death that she seems to begin to recognize the value of his ways in her life. As in Olive Kitteridge, the characters that populate these intermingled stories don’t lead exciting lives; there isn’t much in Crosby, Maine that has changed. There are few opportunities for significant change, since the town seems to hang onto the ways of doing things the way they’ve always been done, while at the same time growing somewhat in social awareness. Olive is, of course, still viewed by the town as the disagreeably irritable woman that has been crabby so long that she is referred to by such descriptions as “That pickle person. You know ---- what’s like a pickle?” followed by another saying ”That’s just who she is.” These stories, which are all linked to Olive in one way or another, through past association as students or teachers she worked with before her retirement, longtime neighbors, they share these inner thoughts of Olive, and sometimes with Olive about life in Crosby, and their life struggles, and their lives since leaving Crosby. Still, this is Olive’s story. With the passage of more years behind than before her, looking back on her life over the years, I loved the subtle growth in Olive, how she begins to see her failures as well as her growth, declaring herself perhaps “oh, just a tiny – tiny – bit better as a person” and finds herself wishing that Henry was around to see her light shine through. Many thanks for the ARC provided by Random House Publishing Group – Random House
jdowell 3 days ago
Such a pretty Fall cover on this book with the falling leaves! I have read several of Elizabeth Strout's books - mostly the Lucy Barton ones, but I have not read Olive Kitteridge. Still when I saw this one I grabbed it thinking only that I love Strout's prose and I'm sure I will enjoy it. I wasn't disappointed at all - Strout's prose is so down-to-earth I was immediately hypnotized into Olive's life. This could be a stand alone book, but I'm sure I could have benefitted from more background by reading the first book. I found Olive to be such an interesting character and enjoyed her revelations as she discovered some things about herself and others in her older years. Strout brings Olive to life and you feel like you know her - like she's a part of your community. There are several short stories interwoven into the book that are all tied together through Olive. Strout masterfully blended these stories moving into and out of Olive's life. I found the book gives insight into older adults and into relationships in general. I totally enjoyed the read. Thanks to Elizabeth Strout and Random House Publishing Group through Netgalley for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
JW88 3 days ago
Olive, Again continues the saga of Olive Kitteridge from the original book of the same name published in 2008. In this newest book, Olive struggles with her identity, her purpose in life and understanding the world around her as she enters old age. Like the original book, the book is thought-provoking and is made up of a collection of narratives of those who live in, or visit,the town of Crosby, Maine. This book too illuminates some of the greatest tragedies and struggles in life - illness, depression, loneliness and despair to name just a few. I found this book, like the first in the series, to be a little too depressing for my liking. Perhaps I am an outlier, as many love this character dearly. Indeed, some might wonder why I would want to read the sequel to this book having felt this way after reading the first in the series. For me, I was intrigued by the character that is Olive and was rooting for her to find happiness and contentment in her older years. Thank you to Netgalley and Random House Publishing Group for the ARC of this book in exchange for the honest review provided here.
HollyLovesBooks4Us 3 days ago
Revisiting old friends... Thank you for the eARC of this sequel of Olive Kitteridge, with this ongoing view into the lives of Olive and company. This was like revisiting old friends, even when that brings challenges anew. I love this sequel and Strout is as wonderful a writer as ever. This makes me want to reread the original. Highly recommend! #OliveAgain #NetGalley #RandomHousePublishingGroupPandomHouse #RandomHouse
paigereadsthepage 3 days ago
The main character, Olive, picks up shortly after where she left off in the previous novel, Olive Kitteridge. While this is the second novel in the series, it can easily be read as a standalone because she recaps the main events that happened in the first novel. However, I recommend reading the first novel in order to appreciate some of the returning characters. Life’s transitions, juxtapositions, and troubles are celebrated through Olive and the other characters. I found the last half of the novel to be extremely emotional. Olive is reaching a fragile point in her life and begins to calculate its significance and purpose. What makes a full life? As Olive ages, she continues to engage in the boulevard of life while trying to amount her existence. In Olive, Again there are thirteen short stories. Out of the 13 short stories, 5 of those are Olive’s direct story. In the remaining 8 stories, Olive makes an appearance in some shape or form. Each short story relates to the central theme of the novel to some degree and occur near or in the setting of Maine. Topics include suicide, sexual freedom, family, adultery, and aging. I love Olive, Again and recommend to lovers of literary sagas and contemporary fiction . Thank you to Elizabeth Strout, Random House, and NetGalley for a copy. Opinions are my own.
paigereadsthepage 3 days ago
The main character, Olive, picks up shortly after where she left off in the previous novel, Olive Kitteridge. While this is the second novel in the series, it can easily be read as a standalone because she recaps the main events that happened in the first novel. However, I recommend reading the first novel in order to appreciate some of the returning characters. Life’s transitions, juxtapositions, and troubles are celebrated through Olive and the other characters. I found the last half of the novel to be extremely emotional. Olive is reaching a fragile point in her life and begins to calculate its significance and purpose. What makes a full life? As Olive ages, she continues to engage in the boulevard of life while trying to amount her existence. In Olive, Again there are thirteen short stories. Out of the 13 short stories, 5 of those are Olive’s direct story. In the remaining 8 stories, Olive makes an appearance in some shape or form. Each short story relates to the central theme of the novel to some degree and occur near or in the setting of Maine. Topics include suicide, sexual freedom, family, adultery, and aging. I love Olive, Again and recommend to lovers of literary sagas and contemporary fiction . Thank you to Elizabeth Strout, Random House, and NetGalley for a copy. Opinions are my own.
Anonymous 5 hours ago
And do u have a dog