On Mystic Lake

On Mystic Lake

by Kristin Hannah

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780449149676
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/28/2010
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 36,153
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.90(h) x 1.12(d)

About the Author

Kristin Hannah is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many acclaimed novels, including The Great Alone, The Nightingale, and Firefly Lane. She and her husband live in the Pacific Northwest.

Read an Excerpt

Rain fell like tiny silver teardrops from the tired sky. Somewhere behind a bank of clouds lay the sun, too weak to cast a shadow on the ground below.

It was March, the doldrums of the year, still and quiet and gray, but the wind had already begun to warm, bringing with it the promise of spring. Trees that only last week had been naked and brittle seemed to have grown six inches over the span of a single, moonless night, and sometimes, if the sunlight hit a limb just so, you could see the red bud of new life stirring at the tips of the crackly brown bark. Any day, the hills behind Malibu would blossom, and for a few short weeks this would be the prettiest place on Earth.

Like the plants and animals, the children of Southern California sensed the coming of the sun. They had begun to dream of ice cream and Popsicles and last year's cutoffs. Even determined city dwellers, who lived in glass and concrete high-rises in places with pretentious names like Century City, found themselves veering into the nursery aisles of their local supermarkets. Small, potted geraniums began appearing in the metal shopping carts, alongside the sun-dried tomatoes and the bottles of Evian water.

For nineteen years, Annie Colwater had awaited spring with the breathless anticipation of a young girl at her first dance. She ordered bulbs from distant lands and shopped for hand-painted ceramic pots to hold her favorite annuals.

But now, all she felt was dread, and a vague, formless panic. After today, nothing in her well-ordered life would remain the same, and she was not a woman who liked the sharp, jagged edges of change. She preferred things to run smoothly, down the middle of theroad. That was where she felt safest--in the center of the ordinary, with her family gathered close around her.

Wife.
Mother.

These were the roles that defined her, that gave her life meaning. It was what she'd always been, and now, as she warily approached her fortieth birthday, it was all she could remember ever wanting to be. She had gotten married right after college and been pregnant within that same year. Her husband and daughter were her anchors; without Blake and Natalie, she had often thought that she might float out to sea, a ship without captain or destination.

But what did a mother do when her only child left home?

What People are Saying About This

Tami Hoag

A luminescent story about the rediscovery of self and of love and the healing power of both. -- Author of A Thin Dark Line

Susan Elizabeth Phillips

A big, beautiful story of love, family, and second chances.

Reading Group Guide

1. On Mystic Lake opens with two scenes of leaving—Natalie fleeing California for England, and Blake quitting his marriage. How do these two acts set the tone for the rest of the book? How is it significant that Annie has little agency, or choice, in these decisions?

2. At the beginning of the novel, how is Annie, in effect, trapped by her own image? How has she fashioned that persona, and how is it the creation of her husband, Blake?

3. Why do you think Kristin Hannah tells the story through several narrative points of view, including those of Annie, Blake, Nick, and Izzy? What does this add to your understanding of the novel? Is there one character that you consider to be the true voice of On Mystic Lake?

4. After Blake asks for a divorce, Annie admits that she’s put her family’s needs above her own. What events in her past have spurred her to do so? How has she been rewarded for her selflessness, and how has it been damaging to her development?

5. Annie and Nick are both linked by loss in their families. How does learning to live alone—and discovering yourself in the process—constitute a theme of the book? In your opinion, who is the most successful at forging his or her own identity? Why?

6. Why didn’t Kathy and Annie keep in touch after high school? Do you think that Annie felt guilty about losing contact? Why or why not?

7. Why do you think Nick chooses to date and marry Kathy, in lieu of Annie? How does this decision affect the dynamic of the “gruesome threesome”? Ultimately, do you think Nick made the correct choice? Based on his memories of Kathy, do you think he truly loved his wife? Why or why not?

8. How does Annie react when she learns of Kathy’s suicide? What do you think drove Kathy to end her life? How has it affected Nick and, most notably, Izzy?

9. Why is taking care of Nick and Izzy so important to Annie? What tools does she use to appeal to Izzy, and to make the child feel cherished and cared for? What is it about Annie that appeals to Izzy, and vice versa? How does Annie’s relationship with Natalie parallel the rapport she enjoys with Izzy?

10. The relationships between fathers and daughters are integral to the development of both parties in On Mystic Lake. Compare and contrast the relationships of Hank and Annie, Blake and Natalie, and Nick and Izzy. What does each daughter want from her father? As the story unfolds, do the fathers change to become more receptive to their daughters’ needs, and if so, how? In your opinion, who has the greatest chance to establish and maintain a successful father-daughter relationship?

11. What does the compass symbolize to Annie? Why does she stop wearing it around her neck, and why does she begin to wear it again later? Why does she give it to
Izzy?

12. “It doesn’t matter,” Annie says to Nick about her love for him. At that point, why doesn’t she believe that her passion for Nick can guide her life? How is she a pragmatist, and how is she a romantic? Ultimately, what compels her to change her mind and leave Blake?

13. Kathy didn’t want to “live in the darkness.” How do each of the characters in the book deal with grief, depression, and loneliness? What coping mechanisms do they use to cope and grow?

14. What shakes Nick into seeking help for his drinking problem? How does his drinking mirror his mother’s? In what ways is he a product of the nature versus nurture argument?

15. Why does Izzy stop talking? What compels her to speak again, and how is Annie instrumental in drawing Izzy out? Why is she wary of speaking to Nick, and how do the two slowly rebuild a rapport? How does Annie facilitate mending the breach between father and daughter?

16. “Our lives are mapped out long before we know enough to ask the right questions,” says Nick. What questions do you think Nick would like to ask? In what ways are Nick and Annie trapped by having to do what is ex pected of them? Ultimately, how do they exercise free will over their own lives? How do the other characters in the novel do the same?

17. Annie’s known in various ways—including Annie Bourne, Annalise Colwater, Mrs. Blake Colwater, mother, wife. How does each name or designation constitute a different identity? At the end of the book, has she embraced one or the other of these identities, or has she developed a new one? How does she incorporate each of these identities into a newly forged character?

18. What compels Blake to end his affair with Suzannah and call Annie? Why doesn’t she immediately return to him and to her marriage? How does he view her as a prize to be won? Does he exhibit love toward her? How?

19. How does Annie’s relationship with her daughter change once Natalie goes to England? In which ways does Natalie look up to and admire Annie? With what aspects of her mother’s character does Natalie find fault? Do you think Natalie’s personality is at all similar to her father’s?
How?

20. How does Annie’s pregnancy represent a turning point for her? Why does she return to Blake after she realizes she’s carrying his child? Why doesn’t she remain with Nick?

21. How does Nick help Annie grapple with her fear and concern about the premature baby? How do his actions contrast with Blake’s behavior? Why doesn’t Annie’s husband connect with children?

22. How do you think Annie would act and feel after signing her divorce papers? How is this character different than the one we meet at the beginning of the book? Why does Annie feel buoyant at the end of the book?

23. Do you believe that at the end of the story Annie will have a joyous reunion with Nick and Izzy? Do you think she’ll open that bookstore in Mystic? Why or why not?

Interviews

A Conversation with Kristin Hannah
Jennifer Morgan Gray is a writer and editor who lives in New York City.

Jennifer Morgan Gray: Did you begin On Mystic Lake with a particular image or idea—the title, perhaps—in mind? Was there a particular character that propelled the story forward?

Kristin Hannah: Often times the beginning of a book is an amorphous and easily forgotten thing, but in this case, I can remember distinctly how it all began. I saw a little girl who thought she was disappearing. Although Mystic did not ultimately turn out to be her story, I still feel that she's the heart of everything; the catalyst that forces the other characters to change and grow. For me, the challenge was putting the little girl in context, wrapping a story around her, finding out why she thought she was vanishing slowly.

JMG: The passages from Izzy's perspective are so vivid. How were you able to get inside the mind of this young, mixed-up girl? Was it difficult for you to achieve and sustain that distinct voice throughout the novel?

KH: Writing in a child's voice is a special challenge. You begin with somewhat rigid constraints and disciples about acceptable word choices and syntax and descriptive capabilities. Ultimately, everything must be accurate for the child's age and life experience. Then you have to find a way to fly within that framework, to be imaginative and almost other-worldly, to see everything and everyone through new and innocent eyes. I loved becoming a child again, and hopefully that passion found its way into Izzy's voice.

JMG: Annie's a reflection of many women in that sheburies her own creative impulses—and her basic emotional needs—for the sake of her family. Was she based on anyone you knew? When writing this book, did you hope that a few people in the same boat as she, might pick up a pen, a paintbrush, or just make some time for themselves? Is writing that creative outlet for you, especially since you began writing after you became a stay-at-home mom?

KH: Annie could be based on so many of the women in my life—friends, neighbors, relatives. As I get older, I see so many Annies around me. Women who chose to get married and have children and loved every minute of it, but then somewhere along the way realized that they'd lost some essential part of themselves. Those of us who are caretakers—and I definitely put myself in this category— often put everyone else's needs first. While this is understandable and even admirable, it can also be a blueprint for disaster. We need to take care of ourselves and our marriages, too. I think that's the lesson Annie needed to learn. I hope that Mystic resonates with women who know how easy it is to lose sight of one's own reflection. And yes,
writing is the outlet for my innermost self. When I sit down at my computer, I'm the girl I remember and the woman I want to be. I can close the door on my "real" life
and become, for a few precious moments, just me.

JMG: The shifting conception of what a family is plays a large part in the novel. Why does Annie have such a hard time tearing herself away from a traditional family framework? What does her "perfect life" initially represent to her? As a writer, what draws you to tell these stories of motherhood and family?

KH: Annie grew up motherless. That's really the cornerstone of her personality. As a child, she was left to imagine her mother and, therefore, to guide herself into womanhood. Her father, although he loved her, was a man trapped by his own upbringing. He taught her what he knew of a woman's place in the world. Because of that, Annie grew up believing that she could succeed in life only by being the perfect wife and mother. No one ever taught her that she should strive also for her best self, that she deserved a happiness of her own. Thus, when her marriage shatters and her child leaves home, she is utterly lost. It is then, when she is alone and confused and heartbroken, that she must finally come of age and choose the woman she will become. Now, Why do I write so often about motherhood? you ask. The easy answer is that it's the cornerstone of my life. Writing is what I do; a mother is what I am. I write about women who are various incarnations and versions of me.
Annie, perhaps, is the me who never had the courage to begin writing that first novel all those years ago . . . or the me who grew up without a mother who believed I could achieve anything.

JMG: Annie characterizes herself as a "good little girl who never cried." As a child and later as an adult, why does she muffle her sadness and grief? What other characters also bury their emotions, to detrimental effect?

KH:Annie has spent her whole life trying to be perfect for those whom she loved. First it was as a daughter. Her grieving father couldn't stand her tears, so she learned to swallow them and keep smiling. Later, she tried to be a flawless wife and mother. An impossible quest as we all know, one that leads all too often to madness, medication, or denial. Annie has chosen denial as her coping mechanism. Over the years, she's suppressed all her emotions to a greater or lesser extent—grief, loss, disappointment. She's afraid that the expression of these dark emotions would lead to ruin, but in that suppression, she's rendered herself mute. Each of the characters in the novel is grappling with the power and pain of big emotions and most are avoiding them in one way or another. Nick is numbing his grief with alcohol and swimming in his own guilt; Blake is using anonymous sex to bolster his flailing ego.

JMG: I love the way you parallel Izzy's belief that she's disappearing with Annie's own realization that her personality and life have vanished. How does Izzy's "disappearance" enable her to grapple with grief and connect with her mother? What compels Annie to figuratively "disappear"? How do both characters become fully formed again?

KH:The disappearance of some aspect of oneself is really the central theme of the novel. For Izzy, obviously, this loss of herself lies in the inability to understand her place in a new world, a world in which she is now a motherless child. She knows that in losing her mother, she has lost some essential piece of herself. The physical manifestation of this emotion is the belief that she's disappearing. In her mind, she imagines that if she vanishes completely, shewill have access to the heaven or spirit world that her mother now inhabits. It is symbolic that she thinks she has
lost her hand first; for, when she finds a way to reach out to Annie and Nick for love, she will see her hand return. For Annie, the slow vanishing is more metaphorical.
She is grieving for the loss of her own dreams, for the end of her life as she always imagined it would be. I think this kind of quiet disappearing is common for women of a certain age who have given up too much of themselves in their quest to take care of others. Throughout the novel, Annie's quest is to look past her own youthful expectations of what her life was supposed to be and to find the truth of her self. She must finally—as we all must—step up onto the stage of her life and be the heroine. Each of these characters will ultimately become whole again by accepting
life as it truly is and daring to love in spite of all the odds.

JMG: Both Blake and Nick turn to alcohol to numb themselves. Why did you choose to give them a similar outlet for their pain and frustration? Do you think that Blake's issues with alcohol, if unchecked, could grow to the extent of Nick's problem? Do they share other similarities?

KH: Nick and Blake both turn to the numbing comfort of alcohol because they share an essential weakness: Both want to run away from their problems. It is often true that people who have trouble with intimacy will look to outside sources for comfort. What separates these men and offers Nick hope for a better future is that he learns to change. He admits his problem and searches for an honest solution, even if it isn't the easy one. Blake, on the other hand, sees his failings and elects to stay on the same self-destructive, alienated path. And yes, he is at great risk of becoming an
alcoholic. I always saw Blake as a truly tragic character. Because of his inability to love, he would wake up one day and realize that he is utterly alone.

JMG: You studied law before turning to writing—which makes the character of attorney Blake even more interesting. Did your experiences in the field inform your depiction of him? How did you develop him so he was a fleshed-out, multidimensional character, instead of just the cheating-husband caricature?

KH: It was critical to me that Blake be more than the clichéd stereotype of the cheating husband. One of the ways I humanized him was via his career. A career that I know quite well. He is a powerful, respected attorney—an isolated man in a field where emotions are marginalized and success is all that matters in the end. His focus on his career allowed him to become increasingly selfish and separate from his stay-at-home wife. But the fault is not his alone, and this, too, humanizes him. The way I saw it, there had perhaps been a time, years ago, when Annie could have demanded more of him, of their marriage, but she let that moment pass in silence. Her silent acceptance was every bit as ruinous to their marriage as his selfishness.
Together they created a dynamic that couldn't succeed because it contained no honest intimacy or true parity. They're both at fault, and that's about as human as it
gets.

JMG: The actual places in the novel are every bit as colorful as the characters. How did you evoke this feeling, especially in comparing Southern California with Mystic,
Washington? What appeals to you about each place, both personally and in your writing?

KH:The easy answer is that I lived in Southern California during my early childhood and in Washington for all the years since. These are two places that I know well, and, obviously, the contrast between the brown heat of Los Angeles and the majestic quiet of Mystic Lake was a perfect representation of the two choices in Annie's life. The really important thing, I think, is my deep connection to Washington
State. My stories lately seem rooted in this damp soil; I love giving readers my Northwest. The Olympic Rainforest, where Mystic is set, is particularly special to
me. In that damp and mythical place are some of my most
treasured memories of my mother.

JMG:Annie doesn't think she's a good role model for Natalie. How is she right, and how is she wrong? How do you imagine the woman that Natalie will grow up to be?

KH:Annie believes that she has failed to show her daughter courage and commitment and individuality. In looking back on her life and marriage, Annie realizes how much of herself she let go without a fight, what a doormat she had
become, and it shames her that she showed her daughter such weakness. But what mother doesn't worry that she hasn't done a good enough job, that she has somehow failed her children? What matters in the end, and what Annie comes to understand, is that she taught her daughter that love is worth fighting for, worth sacrificing for, worth risking everything for.

JMG: The book ends with Annie throwing caution to the wind and driving to Mystic to reunite with Nick. How does this show Annie's evolution toward embracing herself
and her own needs? Did you ever consider actually writing a scene showing their reunion and ending the novel that way, with a happy ending? Or how is this that happy ending?

KH:Actually, I didn't see the ending as "throwing caution to the wind and driving to Mystic to reunite with Nick." To me, Annie was finally embracing her future and allowing her past to be part of who she would become. I saw her, this woman who had let herself be confined and held back, as driving toward her own self-determined future . . . and that Nick was the reward for that courageous choice,
rather than the reason for it. Not surprisingly, I did write the happy-ever-after reunion scene; it was in several versions of the novel. Ultimately, I decided against it. I thought it made the story seem smaller somehow. I preferred ending on the note that Annie had the whole world open to her and she was in the driver's seat. She could go anywhere; to me, that was the happy ending. And let's face it: We all know she ends up with Nick.

JMG: As the story unfolded, what did Annie do that most surprised you? Or did you always know exactly what her next step would be?

KH: I'm not often surprised by my characters. As a writer, I'm very in control. Perhaps it's my legal background. That being said, however, I was shocked that Nick and Annie slept together on their first meeting. I knew there would be all the sparks of a long ago, never-quite-forgotten young love, but sex? I had no idea.

JMG: I'm sure that readers would love to see what happens with Annie, Nick, Blake, and the entire cast of characters in a sequel. Do you have any plans to write one? Or doyou feel that the arc of this story—and these characters—is complete?

KH: Of all the novels I've written, On Mystic Lake is the book that seems to demand a sequel. At least that's whatmy readers tell me. To me, though, the story is complete. I've told all the story that's mine to tell. They really do live happily ever after. I've learned never to say never, but I sure don't see a sequel in the future.

JMG: Do you have any routines or rituals you adhere to while you're writing, which facilitate the process and bring you inspiration and creativity? What are they?

KH: Like most working mothers, I have a pretty rigid schedule. For the most part, I write on school days during school hours. This allows me to take off a lot of time during the summer and winter breaks to be with my family. In a couple of years my son will be going off to college and then I imagine I'll reassess this schedule, but for now it works beautifully. I get the best of both worlds: a career I love and the ability to be a stay-at-home mom. As for routines that inspire me and/or fuel my creativity,
I don't really have any. I don't light candles or burn incense or listen to music. For me, the best spur to creativity is living as full a life as I can—seeing and talking to
friends, hanging out with my family, traveling, going to the movies. The more I'm a part of the crazy madness of ordinary life, the more I have to write about.

JMG: You wrote this book several years ago. Does it differ from the novels that preceded it, and those that came after? If so, how?

KH: On Mystic Lake was truly a break out, path-changing book for me. Prior to it, I had been writing historical romances, and although I loved them, as I got older I found that I wanted to write bigger contemporary novels that reflected the world I saw around me. While many of my novels still feature love stories, they also now explore the myriad other relationships that touch and shape our lives. I have stayed on that path since Mystic. Most of my novels are centered on a woman's coming of age—a thing that can happen at any time in life and always brings with it a host of unexpected choices and challenges.

JMG:
Is there a particular story idea that's currently sparking your imagination? What can readers expect next from you?

KH: Currently I am putting the finishing touches on TheThings We Do for Love. It's the story of an unlikely friendship that forms between a woman who can't have children and the troubled teenage girl who changes her life. It is an intensely emotional, deeply felt novel that journeys to thevery heart of what it means to be a family. After that, who knows? I guess I'll have to start hanging out with my girlfriends and my family and live life to the fullest . . . and see
where it takes me.

Foreword

1. On Mystic Lake opens with two scenes of leaving—Natalie fleeing California for England, and Blake quitting his marriage. How do these two acts set the tone for the
rest of the book? How is it significant that Annie has little agency, or choice, in these decisions?

2. At the beginning of the novel, how is Annie, in effect, trapped by her own image? How has she fashioned that persona, and how is it the creation of her husband, Blake?

3. Why do you think Kristin Hannah tells the story through several narrative points of view, including those of Annie, Blake, Nick, and Izzy? What does this add to your understanding of the novel? Is there one character that you consider to be the true voice of On Mystic Lake?

4. After Blake asks for a divorce, Annie admits that she’s put her family’s needs above her own. What events in her past have spurred her to do so? How has she been rewarded
for her selflessness, and how has it been damaging to her development?

5. Annie and Nick are both linked by loss in their families. How does learning to live alone—and discovering yourself in the process—constitute a theme of the book? In your opinion, who is the most successful at forging his or her own identity? Why?

6. Why didn’t Kathy and Annie keep in touch after high school? Do you think that Annie felt guilty about losing contact? Why or why not?

7. Why do you think Nick chooses to date and marry Kathy, in lieu of Annie? How does this decision affect the dynamic of the “gruesome threesome”? Ultimately, do you think Nick made the correct choice? Based on his memories of Kathy, do you think he trulyloved his wife? Why or why not?

8. How does Annie react when she learns of Kathy’s suicide? What do you think drove Kathy to end her life? How has it affected Nick and, most notably, Izzy?

9. Why is taking care of Nick and Izzy so important to Annie? What tools does she use to appeal to Izzy, and to make the child feel cherished and cared for? What is it about Annie that appeals to Izzy, and vice versa? How does Annie’s relationship with Natalie parallel the rapport she enjoys with Izzy?

10. The relationships between fathers and daughters are integral to the development of both parties in On Mystic Lake. Compare and contrast the relationships of Hank and Annie, Blake and Natalie, and Nick and Izzy. What does each daughter want from her father? As the story unfolds, do the fathers change to become more receptive to their daughters’ needs, and if so, how? In your opinion, who has the greatest chance to establish and maintain a successful father-daughter relationship?

11. What does the compass symbolize to Annie? Why does she stop wearing it around her neck, and why does she begin to wear it again later? Why does she give it to
Izzy?

12. “It doesn’t matter,” Annie says to Nick about her love for him. At that point, why doesn’t she believe that her passion for Nick can guide her life? How is she a pragmatist, and how is she a romantic? Ultimately, what compels her
to change her mind and leave Blake?

13. Kathy didn’t want to “live in the darkness.” How do each of the characters in the book deal with grief, depression, and loneliness? What coping mechanisms do they use to cope and grow?

14. What shakes Nick into seeking help for his drinking
problem? How does his drinking mirror his mother’s? In what ways is he a product of the nature versus nurture argument?

15. Why does Izzy stop talking? What compels her to speak again, and how is Annie instrumental in drawing Izzy out? Why is she wary of speaking to Nick, and how do the two slowly rebuild a rapport? How does Annie facilitate mending the breach between father and daughter?

16. “Our lives are mapped out long before we know enough to ask the right questions,” says Nick. What questions do you think Nick would like to ask? In what ways are Nick and Annie trapped by having to do what is ex
pected of them? Ultimately, how do they exercise free will
over their own lives? How do the other characters in the
novel do the same?

17. Annie’s known in various ways—including Annie Bourne, Annalise Colwater, Mrs. Blake Colwater, mother, wife. How does each name or designation constitute a different
identity? At the end of the book, has she embraced one or the other of these identities, or has she developed a new one? How does she incorporate each of these identities
into a newly forged character?

18. What compels Blake to end his affair with Suzannah and call Annie? Why doesn’t she immediately return to him and to her marriage? How does he view her as a prize to be won? Does he exhibit love toward her? How?

19. How does Annie’s relationship with her daughter
change once Natalie goes to England? In which ways does Natalie look up to and admire Annie? With what aspects of her mother’s character does Natalie find fault? Do you think Natalie’s personality is at all similar to her father’s?
How?

20. How does Annie’s pregnancy represent a turning point for her? Why does she return to Blake after she realizes she’s carrying his child? Why doesn’t she remain with Nick?

21. How does Nick help Annie grapple with her fear and concern about the premature baby? How do his actions contrast with Blake’s behavior? Why doesn’t Annie’s husband
connect with children?

22. How do you think Annie would act and feel after signing her divorce papers? How is this character different than the one we meet at the beginning of the book? Why does Annie feel buoyant at the end of the book?

23. Do you believe that at the end of the story Annie will have a joyous reunion with Nick and Izzy? Do you think she’ll open that bookstore in Mystic? Why or why not?

Customer Reviews

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On Mystic Lake 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 339 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a very good book. the story keeps you interested and wanting more, and it keeps you on the edge of your seat. Even though you can see at times where it's heading you just want to jump in and be part of the story. The character are great and the setting is really good. Kristin has a great way of telling a story that keeps the reader involved and wanting more. She uses a good story line and plot. It is a must have for any reader that enjoys a little mystery, a little drama, and a little romance all in one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i loved this book from the beginning. I was hooked by page two, and crying by page forty. I kept telling all my reader friends that this was one of the best books i've read in a while.....until the end. After I read the last page, I was like are you kidding me! I was left so unsatisfied!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really like her style of writing . . . .I read for escapism . . . .and love a good family story!
Dori Mooney More than 1 year ago
Rich, beautiful women married to handsome workahalic cheating man....goes home to daddy....not home for about 20 years, town always loved her.....meets her highschool sweetheart, who has a wife that just died. Blah...blah....blah...REALLY....one kid, college bound.....husband never home....and she shocked that her husband is cheating. Oh, shes a college graduate from stamford no less. I think that this author should start giving her female leads more spine and a little less whine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My first read by the author. Wonderful story. Many tears. Beautifully developed characters and a story of hope and strength. Tragic happenings that destroy families and beautiful beginnings that prove love is the greatest medicine for a broken heart. Annie is a beautiful heroine and Nick is every womans dream. Izzy at age six steals parts of the book and shows the resilience of children and their ability to love and trust again after their world collapses. Blake proves again that success and money "do not make a man" and after 20 years of marriage Annie finally understands that their are givers and takers and Blake is surely a taker in every sense. The best part of the story is that it is about people we have met in real life and the story and the characters become very real.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I grew tired of "romance" novels. They were all the same, and really only about lust. Most of them full of cliches, with predictable endings. So I quit reading the genre. The beautiful covers of Angel Falls & On Mystic Lake drew me to them like a magnet. So, I read the backs. Something told me they were special, that by reading them, the genre would be redeemed in my heart. And I wasn't disappointed! Believable plots, relatable characters, beautiful settings, and realistic love stories were artistically woven together in a writing style that felt poetic. I wasn't just reading a story, I was transported into it. I had such a profound empathy for the main character, that often I felt as though I WAS her. For a glorious moment, I got to fall in love & live a whole other life. Now, not only do I believe there are good books in the genre, but I actually have a restored hope that real love actually does exist in this world. Thanks to Kristin Hannah.
Ivyton More than 1 year ago
This was my first Kristin Hannah book, and I must say that she is a talented writer, although the ending needed to be lengthened, but I was so disappointed in the vulgar language that was unnecessarily used in the book. The language definitely took away from the enjoyment of the reading, and added nothing at all to the story. Reading is my escape, but the vulgarity only brought more of what I try to separate myself from. It is sad that a writer with such creative talent had to taint her talent with such useless language. I am sad that "On Mystic Lake" will be my first, and last, Kristin Hannah book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am going to read all of Hannah's books! Good story with believable characters. Kept me turning the pages long after I should have turned out the light.
twilightfan30 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the book. There were parts that were a bit predictable and I kept expecting a twist in the ending that didn't come, but overall a great story of love, grief, and hope. I enjoyed the book and found it hard to put down most nights.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Couldn't put this book down!
Heather Shelton More than 1 year ago
I love kristins books but i hated the way this one ended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the author! This is the 3rd book I have read of her's and love her style of writing. Keeps me wanting more after the book is done.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kristen Hannah has done it again. She has delivered another family drama that is an entertaining read. I bought this book on vacation as a beach read after enjoying Hannah's Firefly Lane & True Colors. I finished the book in about a day and a half. I did fly through this book, but it kept me interested with tales of seemingly real life relationships. Hannah doesn't sugarcoat the emotions of this book. She deals with disappointment, shock, second chances (deserved or not), guilt and other no so happy emotions through a story that I think many could relate to. If you're looking for a good summer read, I would recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have fallen in love with Kristin Hannah's writing. This book opens up such a great topic with loss and divorce. This is a very touching story about how people help each other with what is going on in their lifes and what love does to people when they have had a loss or going through a divorce.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I kind of figured out how the book was going to turn out but the ending surprised me a little. I had figured out the just of it but didn't know specific details. All in all, I fully enjoyed it and couldn't put it down!
klh More than 1 year ago
A wonderful book ~ Hannah has an excellent style and really develops her characters - you feel like you know them personally. Great for book club discussion but also perfect for an enjoyable read. I loved Firefly Lane and look forward to reading more by Kristin Hannah!
ldrumm16 on LibraryThing 28 days ago
While I was able to tell that this was one of Kristin Hannah's earlier novels (it didn't have the depth that later novels like Winter Garden and Firefly Lane have) I still really enjoyed it. Annie Colwater's personality reminded me so much of my mom's - she's a total people pleaser that worries about everyone's happiness but her own. Without giving away any of the storyline, I will say that I wanted to shake Annie about 3/4 of the way through the book when a life-altering event happens. Up to that point, it seemed that Annie had finally developed a back bone and then suddenly it just disappeared. I have a very hard time with women that have weak personalities and I found myself yelling at Annie throughout the story.In the end, Annie seems to be on the road to following her heart. I can't say I agree with all of the events that led her there, but I was happy to see her doing what she wanted as opposed to what everyone else wanted her to do.This wasn't as deep a read as some of Hannah's other work, but it was emotionally exhausting at times. Not Hannah's best, but certainly still a great story that I would recommend.
WeeziesBooks on LibraryThing 28 days ago
¿On Mystic Lake: A Novel¿ is another fun to read Kristin Hannah novel. Dealing with an empty nest as her only daughter goes off to college Annelise¿s husband Blake informs her that her wants a divorce. Adrift and terribly lonely she returns to her home on Mystic Lake for a short rest. She stays with her father and finally ventures out into the community where she meets a cast of interesting characters including the town beautician, a handsome widow, Nick, who is an old friend and her Doctor who took care of her when she was a child. As she becomes involved in their lives she meets Izzy, Nick¿s daughter. Izzy has serious problems that have appeared since her mother died. They include the inability to communicate, and the fact that she believes she is disappearing piece by piece like her mother disappeared, These issues all seem to stem from the terrible loss of her mother and her fathers depression. Annelise is drawn toward Izzy, as she misses her own daughter and is trying to find a new purpose in her life since her own family has broken apart.Annelise becomes attached to the people in the community but then faces the need to return to her home and own daughter as she will be coming back from school. The story is heartwarming and the characters vivid and enjoyable. An easy and fun read though you may need a crying tissue for a couple of places. This is a light romance set in a delightful small town setting. Can anyone ever go home? That is a good question. I give this novel 4 stars.
pianomama on LibraryThing 28 days ago
A great "take me away" read that has true to life characters. I think Kristin Hannah consistenly hits the mark in her books in making strong female characters that go through struggles and moral dilemmas we all can relate to----either personally or through someone we know. Kristin Hannah has replaced Danielle Steel in my library for the "chick flick" book that I can escape in.
labelleaurore on LibraryThing 28 days ago
I know that most of Kistin Hannah involves always the same base story but this is for me, an always refreshing book to read, doesn't matter where I am. I could read her on and on. Mother to daughter, boyfriend to girfriend, divorce mature woman, corporate wife, country house, etc...
Kristinjordan on LibraryThing 28 days ago
This is my first Kristin Hannah novel and I am now a fan. It isn't classic literature but it is good. It is well written and I loved the characters. I did feel alittle cheated at the end. I felt she could have written at least one more chapter.
WillowOne on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This book is about family dynamics and all of its ups and downs. Marriage, separation, children, losing one's self, parent/child relationships, adultery and forgiveness.Annie Colwater finds after many years of marriage and the raising of a family she is experiencing empty house syndrome and has lost herself over the years. Her husband has finally admitted to "stepping out" on the marriage and being in love with another. After years of being what everyone else wanted and needed her to be she sets off to find and recapture herself. If you have ever had to pick up the pieces of a shattered life this book will resonate with you. A great read!
Anonymous 6 months ago
Very good book. I thought that it was going to be "predictable", but it took some surprising turns. Only problem- I wanted a part two, to see what happens long term...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderful story with lessons of life for all of us! ..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago